Fall 2011 - Undergraduate Course Description
Intructor:
Park, Peter
Discipline and Number
HIST 4380 Section: 001
Day:
MW Time: 11:30 AM - 12:45 PM
Course Title:
European Enlightenment

DESCRIPTION OF COURSE:

European history, culture, and thought from 1648 to 1815--an era of absolute monarchy, Enlightenment, and revolution. We will interpret the era’s literature, political theory, theology, metaphysics, and science through our study of important published works from the era. We will also reflect on the nature of baroque and neo-classical art. The course ends with the French Revolution and the birth of human rights and scientific racism.

REQUIRED TEXTS:

Tentative List:

Tim Blanning, The Pursuit of Glory: The Five Revolutions That Made Modern Europe, 1648-1815 (Penguin, 2008) ISBN 978-0143113898

René Descartes, Philosophical Essays and Correspondence, ed. by Roger Ariew (Hackett, 2000) ISBN 978-0872205024

Benedict de Spinoza, Theological-Political Treatise, trans. by Samuel Shirley, 2nd ed. (Hackett, 2001) ISBN 978-0872206076

Leo Strauss, "Persecution and the Art of Writing,” in Leo Strauss, Persecution and the Art of Writing (Univ. of Chicago Press, 1988, c1952), pp. 22-37

Samuel Pufendorf, On the Duty of Man and Citizen According to Natural Law (Cambridge UP, 1991) ISBN 978-0521359801

Isaac Newton, excerpts

John Locke, Second Treatise of Government (Hackett, 1980) ISBN 978-0915144860

Robert Bernasconi and Anika Maaza Mann, “The Contradictions of Racism: Locke, Slavery, and the Two Treatises,” in Andrew Valls (ed.), Race and Racism in Modern Philosophy (Cornell UP, 2005), pp. 89-107

Françoise de Graffigny, Letters from a Peruvian Woman, trans. by David Kornacker (Modern Languages Association, 1993) ISBN 978-0873527781

Lynn Hunt, The French Revolution and Human Rights: A Brief Documentary History (Bedford/St. Martin, 1996) ISBN 978-0312108021
Robert Bernasconi and Tommy L. Lott, eds., The Idea of Race, pp. 1-37 (avail. on e-Reserve)

COURSE REQUIREMENTS/EVALUATION CRITERIA:

attendance and participation in discussion = 20%, mid-term exam = 20%, 6-page paper = 25%, 10-page paper = 35%

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