Fall 2011 - Graduate Course Description
Intructor:
Channell, David
Discipline and Number
HUHI 7315 Section: 001
Day:
T Time: 1:00 PM - 3:45 PM
Course Title:
Issues in Science and Religion

DESCRIPTION OF COURSE:

THIS COURSE IS AVAILABLE TO DOCTORAL STUDENTS ONLY.

This seminar will investigate the effects of science on religion and the effects of religion on science. We will begin by analyzing the differences and the similarities in the methodologies of science and religion. We will then focus on the interactions between science and religion in the early modern period, the 19th century and the 20th century. Topics will include: Galileo, Newton and Leibniz - the concept of God in a clockwork universe; Darwin - the problem of evolution and creation; God and the new physics; and artificial intelligence – the rise of spiritual machines.

REQUIRED TEXTS:

READINGS (may be drawn from the following):
D. Lindberg & R. Numbers, God and Nature: Historical Essays On the Encounter between
Christianity and Science
John Brooke, Science and Religion; Some Historical Perspectives
Ian Barbour, Religion and Science: Historical and Contemporary Issues
John F. Haught, Science and Religion: From Conflict to Conversation
Edward Larson, Summer for the Gods: The Scopes Trial and America
Ray Kurzweil, The Age of Spiritual Machines

COURSE REQUIREMENTS/EVALUATION CRITERIA:

Students should attend class regularly and keep current with the readings. One research paper will be required.

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