Spring 2013 - Graduate Course Description
Intructor:
Park, Peter
Discipline and Number
HUHI 7314 Section: 501
Day:
R Time: 7:00 PM - 9:45 PM
Course Title:
European Enlightenment

DESCRIPTION OF COURSE:

THIS COURSE IS AVAILABLE TO DOCTORAL STUDENTS ONLY.

This is a course on the historiography of the European Enlightenment. Students will gain knowledge of past and current trends of research in European intellectual and cultural history in the period 1650-1800; by studying selected historians' works, representing the last 35 years, that are regarded as indispensable to any future research on the European Enlightenment.

REQUIRED TEXTS:

Christopher Hill, The World Turned Upside Down: Radical Ideas during the English Revolution (Penguin, 1984) ISBN 978-0140137323

Steven Shapin and Simon Schaffer, Leviathan and the Air-Pump: Hobbes, Boyle, and the Experimental Life (Princeton UP, 1989) ISBN 978-0691024325

Reinhart Koselleck, Critique and Crisis: Enlightenment and the Pathogenesis of Modern Society (MIT Press, 1988) ISBN 978-0-262-61157-2

J├╝rgen Habermas, Structural Transformation of the Public Sphere: An Inquiry into a Category of Bourgeois Society (The MIT Press, 1991) ISBN 978-0262581080

Margaret C. Jacob, The Radical Enlightenment: Pantheists, Freemasons and Republicans (Cornerstone, 2006) ISBN 978-1887560740

Robert Darnton, The Literary Underground of the Old Regime (Harvard UP 1985) ISBN 978-0674536579

Lynn Hunt, Politics, Culture, and Class in the French Revolution (University of California Press, 2004) ISBN 978-0520241565

Michel Foucault, Power/Knowledge: Selected Interviews and Other Writings, 1972-1977 (Vintage, 1980)

Londa Schiebinger, Nature's Body: Gender in the Making of Modern Science (1st ed.,1993)

Isabel V. Hull, Sexuality, State, and Civil Society in Germany, 1700-1815 (1997)

COURSE REQUIREMENTS/EVALUATION CRITERIA:

Regular attendance and participation in discussion including a formal presentation (25%) and a 20-page historiographical essay (75%) on a theme or topic appropriate to our concerns in this course.

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