Spring 2014 - Undergraduate Course Description
Intructor:
Gossin, Pamela
Discipline and Number
HIST 4378 Section: 002
Day:
R Time: 4:00 PM - 6:45 PM
Course Title:
American West: Culture and Film

DESCRIPTION OF COURSE:

Pre-requisites:

Upper-division standing, or the permission of the instructor (just email me!)
No prior knowledge of time period or literary materials required; it's a great class to enrich your own understanding and enjoy new perspectives!


Course Description:

From its days as an imagined frontier of unlimited possibilities, a rich native habitat of woods, prairies, Sandhills, Badlands and Rockies, the homeplace of numerous Native American tribal cultures, to the early era of Anglo-European exploration and settlement, through the Dust Bowl and modern agricultural and industrial development, the American West (as idea and reality) has experienced tremendous transformation over the past 400 years. Over time, the landscape of the west has served as a vast canvas for inscribing a wide range of human experiences, cultural and environmental changes.

In this course we will explore a wide variety of historical texts, creative literature and films that construct and engage the myths, stereotypes, and hidden truths of the human and natural drama of the American West. Among the themes and ideas we will discuss: the role of the natural environment and the relationship of men and women to the land; the creative tensions of exploration and domestication; the relationship of the Great American Desert to the boom/bust of the American Dream; the magic and disillusionment of the myth of the wild, wild, west.

If you've never left Texas, this course will give you a grand tour of the rest of the West and from sea to shining sea, providing fresh views and new appreciation for our relationship with the nature, culture and diverse peoples who came before us to hope, dream and live out west.

REQUIRED TEXTS:

REQUIRED:

HISTORY TEXTS: Tentative list; subject to change
(Do not purchase until after discussion 1st week of class (most of our historical readings will be made available free through Electronic Reserve!)

David Murdoch, The American West: The Invention of a Myth. University of Nevada Press. 2001. ISBN 978-0874173697.

Robert Hine, John Faragher, Frontiers: A Short History of the American West, New Haven: Yale University Press, 2008; ISBN-10: 030013620X; ISBN-13: 978-0300136203

John D.Unruh, The Plains Across: The Overland Emigrants and the Trans-Mississippi West, 1840–1860 (1993)

Sheila McManus, Choices and Chances: A History of Women in the U.S. West, Wiley-Blackwell, 2011; ISBN: 978-0-88295-277-2

Patricia Limerick, The Legacy of Conquest: The Unbroken Past of the American West. New York: Norton & Company, 1988.

Elizabeth Jameson and Susan Armitage, eds., Writing the Range: Race, Class, and Culture in the Women’s West (1997)


LITERARY TEXTS: tentative list, subject to change

James Fenimore Cooper, The Prairie, Penguin edition; # ISBN: 9780140390261

John G. Neihardt, Black Elk Speaks; UNP; ISBN pending

Willa Cather, O Pioneers, Dover, 1993; # ISBN-10: 0486277852 # ISBN-13: 978-0486277851

John Steinbeck, Grapes of Wrath Penguin, 2006; ISBN-10: 0143039431; ISBN-13: 978-0143039433

Sherman Alexie, The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven, Perennial, 1994 # 0060976241

PICK ONE OF FOLLOWING:
Annie Proulx, Close Range: Wyoming Stories Scribner, 2000 # 0684852225
OR
Kathleen Norris, Dakota: A Spiritual Geography, Mariner Books, 2001 # 0618127240
OR
Linda Hogan, Solar Storms, Scribner, 1995; ISBN 978-684-82539-7
OR
Pam Houston, Cowboys are my Weakness, Norton, 2005; ISBN-10: 0393326357 /
ISBN-13: 978-0393326352

COURSE REQUIREMENTS/EVALUATION CRITERIA:

Course objectives:
In this interdisciplinary class, students will read and discuss historical texts, works of creative literature, and view films, works of visual art and listen to 19th and early 20thc. music.

Attendance and Participation: 1/4th
Objective midterm exam + one take-home essay: 1/4th
Objective final exam; 1/4th
One 5pp interpretative/analytical paper: 1/4th

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