Fall 2016 - Undergraduate Course Description
Instructor
Starnaman, Sabrina
Discipline and Number
ARHM 3342 Section 501
Day
T Time 7:00 PM - 9:45 PM
Course Title
Fantastic Bodies

Description of Course:

This course focuses on the subject of the human body as it is represented, used, and defined by society. We will encounter works of fiction, history, art, and film that depict bodies. We will also read analytical examinations of historical practices and critical works of theory in order to gain experience in various analytic and interpretive approaches. This class explores interdisciplinary connections among artistic and intellectual endeavors appropriate to a range of courses in the Arts and Humanities. Our course will explore the convergence of the liberal arts around the theme of “Fantastic Bodies.”

Required Texts:

Life in the Iron Mills, Rebecca Harding Davis. Bedford Cultural Edition.
ISBN-10: 031213360X
ISBN-13: 978-0312133603

How the Other Half Lives, Jacob Riis. Bedford Cultural Edition.
ISBN-10: 0312574010
ISBN-13: 978-0312574017

Geek Love, Katherine Dunn
ISBN-10: 0375713344
ISBN-13: 978-0375713347

Kraken, China Miéville
ISBN-10: 0345497503
ISBN-13: 978-0345497505

More than Human, Theodore Sturgeon
ISBN-10: 0375703713
ISBN-13: 978-0375703713

Accessing the Future is recommended, but not required. I did not order it at Off Campus books, so I suggest ordering it online. We will have a chance to speak with an author included in this volume and will be reading multiple sections.
ISBN-10: 0957397542
ISBN-13: 978-0957397545

Copies of the required texts are available at Off Campus Books.
Off Campus Books (located behind Fuzzy’s Tacos)
561 W. Campbell Road, #201
Richardson, TX 75080

Course Requirements/Evaluation Criteria:

Reading Journal
Group Presentation

Student Learning Outcomes:
•Students will be able to analyze primary texts using historical context and/or critical interpretive approaches.
•Students will be able to design a presentation that augments a interdisciplinary discussion of “Fantastic Bodies”

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