Somewhere in Texas - Devyn Gaudet

Page 3, polaroid transfer on cold press archival paper, 2014 Page 16, polaroid transfer on cold press archival paper, 2014

Friday, May 22, 2015 – Friday, June 19, 2015,
Venue: Visual Arts Building, Main Gallery
Admission: Free
Season: 2014-15

Reception:  Friday, May 22, 2015, 6:30 – 8:30 pm

Through the use of image and text, Somewhere in Texas sets out to creatively document the great State of Texas that we call home.  Through juxtaposing familiar images of the Texas landscape with unfamiliar details about the State itself Somewhere in Texas explores the gap between the vernacular and the landscape, often merging the two. From Dairy Queens to rivers. From motels to wild flowers. From everything I saw—to everything I didn’t.

 

DEVYN GAUDET - STATEMENT

Somewhere in Texas:

 

“Somewhere In Texas documents everything I saw—to everything I didn’t.

Everything I knew—to everything I learned.”

 

The Texas landscape is one that constantly changes as you drive across the state yet also stays familiar—as if something seen before. The project Somewhere in Texas is a photo-conceptual documentation of the State and aims to harness that familiarity, and enhance it, through the use of the banal snapshot aesthetic and the Polaroid image. The Polaroid is considered an amateur camera creating accessible images for the viewer, and also creates a sense of nostalgia. Not only through the muted hues, and range of tones, but also the Polaroid camera itself and the physicality of the images it produces. This project is composed of Polaroid transfers, digital prints, postcards, and old film boxes. The photographs presented range from common vernacular architecture such as Dairy Queen’s and motels, found text such as signage, wild flowers, rivers and created text. The created textual imagery found in Somewhere in Texas consists factual statements about the state of Texas combined with the artists own personal writings to further connect the viewer the to work. It acts as the guide through this short trip of Texas and, hopefully, serves to connect them to the piece as if it were their own. 

This series is rooted in the desire to get up and go and to show what was seen in a new intriguing way. Engaging in a conversation with artists such as John Baldessari, Ed Ruscha, and the Becher’s, Somewhere in Texas creatively documents the great State that we call home through juxtaposing familiar images of the landscape with unfamiliar details about the State itself exploring the gap between the vernacular and the landscape, often merging the two. Through this process the series challenges the “truth” by pairing factual and fictional text with straightforward banal roadside images of Texas while simultaneously creating a non-linear, yet somehow familiar, narrative of the vernacular landscape of Texas. 

 

BIO:

Devyn Gaudet is a photographer living and working in Fort Worth, Texas. A graduate of The University of Texas at Dallas (BA 2011), she is a member of the Society for Photographic Education, The Ghost Town Arts Collective, and The Junior Ward. Most recently her work has been exhibited at 500X Gallery and Life in Deep Ellum in Dallas. She is currently pursuing her MA in Aesthetic Studies at The University of Texas at Dallas.



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