Faculty

Rosen, Mark

Assistant Professor

Office:  JO 5.114
Phone: 
972-883-2367
Email: 
mark.rosen@utdallas.edu

Areas of Specialization:  European Art, 1200 - 1700; Italian Renaissance art and history; the history of cartography; the social history of art; medieval Venice; Italian-Ottoman relations; early modern slavery; public monuments; artists’ biographies

Education: PhD and MA, History of Art, University of California, Berkeley
BA, English, University of California, Berkeley

Research: Mark Rosen specializes in late medieval, Renaissance and Baroque art, with a special interest in cartography. He earned his doctorate at the University of California, Berkeley, and before arriving at UT Dallas held a National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship at the Medici Archive Project in the Archivio di Stato of Florence, Italy. He has also received grants and fellowships from the Samuel H. Kress Foundation, the Huntington Library, the Renaissance Society of America, the Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation, and the Fondazione Roberto Longhi.

His first book, The Mapping of Power in Renaissance Italy: Painted Cartographic Cycles in Social and Intellectual Context, will be published in January 2015 by Cambridge University Press. Bridging the disciplines of art history and the histories of science, cartography, and geography, the book closely studies surviving Italian painted maps made at a moment better known for its printed maps and atlases. It has been awarded the Sixteenth Century Society and Conference’s inaugural Founders’ Prize for best first book manuscript in early modern studies (ca. 1450–ca. 1660). He has also published articles and reviews in a number of international art-historical and historical journals, including The Art Bulletin, Renaissance Quarterly, The Sixteenth Century Journal, Mitteilungen des Kunsthistorischen Institutes in Florenz, Oud Holland, Archives Internationales d'Histoire des Sciences, Nuncius, and CAA Reviews.

Teaching: Dr. Rosen regularly offers courses covering European art between 1200 and 1700. Among his regular offerings upper-level courses are AHST 3313 (Medieval Art), AHST 3315 (Art of the Renaissance) and AHST 3316 (Art of the Baroque), as well as topics courses on subjects such as Medieval Venice, Love and Marriage in the Renaissance, and Leonardo da Vinci. His graduate courses have included courses on the History of Cartography, Style and Mannerism, Renaissance and Baroque Sculpture, Artists’ Biographies, and Narrativity in Art.