Courses

Undergraduate Graduate
Course Description Aesthetics is the underlying “logic of senses” guiding human beings in all choices they make (eating, dressing, interacting with others, selecting what they like and what they dislike). As such, it is expressed in the ways in which we perceive the world and the way we change the world. Indeed, aesthetic considerations, implicit or explicit, are guiding all our choices. Within culture, aesthetics provides the means for understanding what it means to like or dislike (fashion, architecture, literature, films, games, art works, other persons, etc.). It also guides in the making of new aesthetic entities, in particular those pertaining to interactive arts, the field in which you will be active. You will become professionals in the largest segment of the economy—aesthetic expression (present in everything we do, making art, designing weapons, shaping the universe of our existence, promoting learning, helping in the communication of scientific discoveries or political decision making, etc.). The outcome of this class is expressed in: a) Knowledge of aesthetics as it shaped, and continues to shape, human activity b) Aesthetic skills expressed in aesthetic value judgments and aesthetic innovation in the age of interactive media and computational design c.) Aesthetic competence corresponding to the fast dynamics of digital expression The class will engage students in reading and reporting on foundational texts. There is continuity—tradition-- and there is discontinuity—innovation-- in aesthetic perception and in the practice of aesthetic skills. Students will also explore the aesthetics of innovation and aesthetic experiment against the background of culture. If and when necessary, guest lecturers will cover the “hot” topics of current developments (interactivity, immersion, virtuality, etc.). Aesthetics is of particular interest to our explorations in the emergence of new media. You, the students in the class, are asked to practice aesthetics. Students are encouraged, and indeed required, to post class-work on the website for this class. Given the many choices open to students in ATEC, the class will also serve as an open forum for defining the students’ focus in the program.
T
4:00 pm - 6:45 pm
Mihai Nadin
Exploration of advanced design principles and practices common to most design professions. Topics include the language of design, core design concepts, analysis of design, and specialized design practices.
R
7:00 pm - 9:45 pm
Cassini Nazir
This class is a introduction to the new facilities in Sound that are just coming online for the new IATC. Audio Technology is a multifaceted discipline that involves understanding of many aspects of transducers and Electronics. In this class we will go element by element through the many parts and interrelationships of what makes a good recording in many different contexts. Microphones, Speakers, Mixers, Compressors/Limiters, Reverb and other signal processing techniques are all part of the puzzle of modern audio production. By systematically assessing the workflow associated with each element of the recording process the engaged student will come away with a much broader understanding of the techniques of modern recording science and art. Pre-requisites: Willingness to learn and permission of the instructor
W
7:00 pm - 9:45 pm
Scot Gresham-Lancaster
Advanced study of the structure and design of digital, analog, narrative, and social game systems. Course focuses on theory, critical analysis, innovation, and prototype creation.
R
4:00 pm - 6:45 pm
Timothy Christopher
Advanced study of the computer game as cultural artifact, procedural system, social space, and artistic medium. (May be repeated for credit as topics vary to a maximum of 6 credit hours.)
W
10:00 am - 12:45 pm
Monica Evans
Exploration of design principles and practices for the creation of interactive experiential spaces. Course focuses on atmosphere, flow, interactivity, spatial narrative, and user experience. (May be repeated for credit as topic vary to a maximum of 6 credit hours.)
M
1:00 pm - 3:45 pm
Scott Swearingen
The use and opportunity for screenless interfaces is growing and this technology is expected to be one of the key media growth areas over the next few years. The purpose of the class is to explore the emerging area of screenless interface design to include oculus rift, google glass, wearables such as watches and wristbands, spatial interaction display, drones, augmented reality and important related enabling technologies such as natural language interaction. Application discussions for this technology will include health and medical related sectors, education, law enforcement, and business as well as entertainment. Class resources will include technology and project demonstrations, guest speakers, readings, lectures and other methods. As a result of the class, students will understand design opportunities and challenges presented by screenless interfaces and develop a class project where course concepts are put into practice. No heavy programming required and students of all areas of interest and levels of technical skill are welcome. Address inquiries to Dr. Marge Zielke. margez@utdallas.edu 972-883-4333
R
7:00 pm - 9:45 pm
Marjorie Zielke
Exploration and application of advanced methods and techniques (literary, artistic, conceptual, and technical) involved in the development of interactive games. Includes participation in development team for creation of a prototype, vertical slice demo, or complete original game. (May be repeated for credit as topics vary to a maximum of 9 credit hours.)
T
1:00 pm - 3:45 pm
Monica Evans
W
4:00 pm - 6:45 pm
Timothy Christopher
Exploration and application of advanced methods and techniques for the creation of visual images through the use of digital media. (May be repeated as topics vary to a maximum of 6 credit hours.)
F
10:00 am - 12:45 pm
Midori Kitagawa
W
4:00 pm - 6:45 pm
Kyle Kondas
Exploration and application of advanced methods and techniques for the creation of visual images through the use of digital media. This course explores the relationship between digital fabrication tools and contemporary artistic practice. Lectures and hands-on activities are supplemented by 2-D vector based programs, digital photography software and 3-D modeling programs. Students learn how to use the computer as both a design tool and as a tool for fabrication. Department consent required
M
4:00 pm - 6:45 pm
Andrew Scott
R
1:00 pm - 3:45 pm
Kyoung Swearingen
F
7:00 pm - 9:45 pm
Paul Fishwick
Advanced research in digital music and sound design. Topics may include advanced visualization of music and sound, sonification of images, and advanced research in interactive sound applications. (May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 6 credit hours.)
R
7:00 pm - 9:45 pm
Scot Gresham-Lancaster
This course presents students with a variety of research methods that are appropriate for advanced research in Arts and Technology. Methods will include ethnographic, experimental, descriptive, historical, and philosophical.
W
7:00 pm - 9:45 pm
Frank Dufour
This course examines surveillance technologies and surveillant media. We all know we live in a "surveillance society," but when did it arise, what dynamics fueled its conception, and when, where, and how did media and communication technologies enter the mix? In our contemporary world, why does surveillance occur where it occurs? How do people challenge, modify, and subvert surveillance practices? To begin, we'll consider the relationship between surveillance and the myth of total transparency in liberal democratic theory, as well as the historical rise of surveillance practices in the West. We'll move from there to the relationship between surveillance and pleasure; sousveillance and coveillance; the construction of certain bodies and populations as the appropriate targets of surveillance; dataveillance; and surveillance as a technique interwoven with practices of measuring, recording, and monitoring. Course readings will include texts drawn from political philosophy, history, film theory, and new media theory. Course materials will include biosensors, films, tactical media, architecture, and networked data projects. We'll spend a third of the class digesting key concepts; a third examining media, projects, and artworks; and a third developing and sharing our projects.
R
7:00 pm - 9:45 pm
Olivia Banner
New media technology and different digital platforms are altering the relationship between journalists and audiences. In the context of this emerging media landscape, we will explore the nature, promises, and limitations of contemporary journalism in informing, engaging and entertaining the public.
T
7:00 pm - 9:45 pm
Angela Lee
One of the definitions of text is "something, such as a literary work or other cultural product, regarded as an object of critical analysis" (thefreedictionary.com). If we drill down far enough into any form of digital "text," we arrive at the level of binary code: 1s and 0s. This includes other objects of critical analysis, such as digital images, sound files, animations, videos, etc. This material commonality draws our attention to the fact that any digital object has multiple layers--from the surface representation to the source code, down to those 1s and 0s. In addition to this kind of fundamental multi-mediality, it is very rare to encounter a digital text that is composed on the surface of only one type of media object. In other words, in digital textuality, words almost always co-exist with images, links, sound, and video, all built atop a foundation of code. This course takes these types of multi-mediality as its starting point and asks students to reconceive "digital textuality" as a more broad form of cultural product that can occur in multiple media formats and that explores the unique affordances of different kinds of text objects. Through this production-intensive course, students will explore the theoretical and material connections between analog and digital textuality, centered on text, image, sound, and moving image. Students will apply their theoretical understanding of digital textuality to the production of a portfolio, composed of four separate digital media objects and a short paper, each of which foregrounds certain modes of making meaning. The goal is to examine the shifts in writing and representation in digital environments. The course situates "writing" within a networked, digital environment and, as such, will focus on the production of "texts" in different media forms. In this course, students will: 1. Become familiar with shifts in representation in text, image, and sound, including the relationship between them. 2. Investigate the social and cultural implications of new forms of text, image, sound, and moving image. 3. Investigate a variety of tools of digital production and utilize these tools to communicate ideas. 4. Utilize the existing research and publications of media studies in their own scholarship. 5. Engage in processes of feedback and revision to improve their work.
W
7:00 pm - 9:45 pm
Kim Knight
M
7:00 pm - 9:45 pm
Rosanna Guadaguo
This graduate seminar will survey the ways that professional publishing is evolving today and some of the experimental publishing methods being used. The instructor is the Executive Editor for the Leonardo Publications at MIT Press and guest lecturers will include the managing editor at MIT Press and other professionals in the publishing industry. Topics addressed will include citizen journalism, reputation management, advanced blogging and podcasting, e-book publishing. We will also review the way that material is peer reviewed for publication today and some of the innovations in collaborative filtering. We will also review the various academic and professional web site venues where professionals can now post their writings. Students will carry out projects in the seminar tied to their own MA or PhD projects to help them develop advanced methods for documenting and disseminating their work. The course is suitable for MA and PhD students in ATEC or EMAC with prior experience in electronic or social media publishing.
M
7:00 pm - 9:45 pm
Roger Malina
Advanced collaborative workshop devoted to the creation of sophisticated communications employing multiple media platforms. (May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 credit hours.)
W
4:00 pm - 6:45 pm
Dean Terry