Courses

Undergraduate Graduate
In this course we aim to explore and innovate interdisciplinary approaches in ATEC. Participants with a foundation in ATEC or joining from outside are encouraged to enrich their existing expertise with a new aspect. The course provides an early chance to develop an ongoing research topic and connect with different areas in the ATEC landscape.
W
7:00 pm - 9:45 pm
Maximilian Schich
Introduction to the interdisciplinary study of mutual interactions between technology and the creative arts. Establishes basic theoretical concepts and principles underlying the graduate program in Arts and Technology. Required of all degree candidates in Arts and Technology.
T
7:00 pm - 9:45 pm
Lucy Petrovic
Exploration of aesthetic principles underlying the interactive electronic arts, their relation to and divergence from aesthetic principles underlying traditional forms of artistic expression. Topics will include interactive games, animation, and new modes of narrative. Required of all degree candidates in Arts and Technology.
T
4:00 pm - 6:45 pm
Mihai Nadin
Exploration of advanced design principles and practices common to most design professions. Topics include the language of design, core design concepts, analysis of design, and specialized design practices.
W
7:00 pm - 9:45 pm
Cassini Nazir
This course explores holistic discovery research and practice in the field of new media studies. Students will learn to uncover insights about user desirability, technological potential and possibility, data evaluation, value measures, and how to select ideas that have the greatest potential to ultimately invest, develop, and build new products and services.
R
7:00 pm - 9:45 pm
Marjorie Zielke
Advanced study of the structure and design of digital, analog, narrative, and social game systems. Course focuses on theory, critical analysis, innovation, and prototype creation.
R
4:00 pm - 6:45 pm
Timothy Christopher
Course will focus entirely on the creation of environment art for real-time rendering. Whiteboxes, camera scripting, player mechanics and collision will be provided by the instructor for students to build on top of. Classes will be studio-based in practice and atmosphere where students will be expected to engage one another in critiques and Q&A while working on their own projects. Basic knowledge of modeling, uv unwrapping, texturing, shading and lighting is required to take the class.
M
1:00 pm - 3:45 pm
Scott Swearingen
This course explores the relationship between digital fabrication tools and contemporary artistic practice. Students utilize the computer as a tool for design and fabrication. In this class students will learn how to prepare files for various outputs as real world objects. Students explore their own personal artistic visions using digital fabrication tools and computer software programs designed for the development of three-dimensional forms, spaces, objects, sites and processes. Students develop a critical basis for the evaluation of their use and explore the possibilities and implications of digital fabrication tools and processes. A historic, theoretic and practical understanding of digital fabrication technologies will provide the foundation for students understanding of these tools and their implications for modern artistic practice. An understanding of the relationship between digital fabrication tools and various computer software programs designed for developing three-dimensional forms, spaces and objects will be gained. Students should have an understanding of 3d computer modeling using nurbs and polygons. A understanding of photoshop and illustrator will help them meet the objectives of this course.
M
4:00 pm - 6:45 pm
Andrew Scott
Exploration of advanced methods and techniques in motion capture animation. Course culminates in a professional-quality animation project. (May be repeated to a maximum of 6 credit hours.)
T
10:00 am - 12:45 pm
Midori Kitagawa
*Registration for this course is determined by a portfolio review TBD by instructors. This advanced course mimics an actual animation studio environment. All major areas of production are represented and work together to create a fully realized 3D animated short(s). Students will select one specific area of interest (i.e. Rigging) along with secondary interests to focus on for the duration of the project. This course utilizes various aspects of all areas of computer animation including story development, layout, modeling, texturing, rigging, animation and lighting, rendering/compositing, sound design as well as project planning and management. This is a two semester sequence course. Selected students must be able to register for both sessions (Fall/Spring).
T
10:00 am - 12:45 pm
Sean McComber
This course teachings system modeling methods using multimedia such as sound, music, animation and video. The focus will be on learning modeling through multimedia. Max/Msp/Jitter is used as the software. Pre-requisite: good knowledge of programming in a language such as Java or JavaScript.
MW
4:00 pm - 5:15 pm
Paul Fishwick
This seminar will address the research or development projects of students that involve bridging their work in the arts and humanities as it connects to science and mathematics. The instructor is both a Professor in ATEC and a Professor in the UTD School of Natural Science and Mathematics (Physics). We will have guest lectures in brain and cognitive sciences, geo-sciences, physics and astronomy and biology. Enrolled Students will identify the areas of science and mathematics that they wish the seminar to focus on. With guest Lecturer Prof Charissa Terranova, we will look at the evolution of ideas and understanding in the sciences and how artists and scholars in the humanities have Appropriated contemporary scientific knowledge over the past century and today. We will design course modules around each students research field and research methodology. I encourage interested students to contact me at roger.malina@utdallas.edu to explore how this seminar could be useful to their work.
M
7:00 pm - 9:45 pm
Roger Malina
The design of the sound design facility at new Edith O'Donnell Art and Technology Building has just come online in the Summer of 2014. The completion of this facility creates the opportunity for fortunate graduates to avail themselves of this world class design and the associated resources of the studio and anechoic chamber. This can not be done without an understanding of the basic principles of recording engineering and technology. That is the focus of this course, to bring students to the level of understanding where they can successfully manage and control complex recording situations using the state of the art equipment at their disposal. Independent use of the studio for graduate projects requiring sound design will not be granted without this course or demonstrated equivalent understanding of the equipment and workflow of the recording studio.
W
7:00 pm - 9:45 pm
Scot Gresham-Lancaster
An examination of the links between technology, play, and culture. Topics may include the ethics of game development, serious and persuasive games, simulation and training, interactive education, identity and culture in virtual worlds, multilinear narrative, and philosophical origins of games as a medium. (May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 6 credit hours.)
T
4:00 pm - 6:45 pm
Timothy Christopher
W
1:00 pm - 3:45 pm
Kyle Kondas
In this course we aim to explore, analyze, and understand real and virtual urban environments from the perspective of urban aesthetics, urban complexity, urban history, urban planning, urban scaling, urban sensing, economics, geoscience, and human mobility, including navigation. Participants are encouraged to bring a wide variety of interests and expertise to the table. Ideally our collaboration includes ATEC students that deal with, operate in, and aim to create authentic urban environments. Participants from the arts and humanities, business, data science, emerging media and communication, geoscience, economics, engineering, public policy, and social science are explicitly invited to add additional aspects, maximizing our common insight. In terms of outcome, we will work towards a common result in a series of weekly assignments.
R
4:00 pm - 6:45 pm
Maximilian Schich
Students will engage in the creation of an advanced creative and/or research project exploring the interaction of the arts with digital technology. Required of all degree candidates in Arts and Technology.
Thomas Linehan
Todd Fechter
Students will engage in the creation of an advanced creative and/or research project exploring the interaction of the arts with digital technology.
Frank Dufour
Introduction to interdisciplinary study of the implications of interactive technology for the creation, dissemination and impact of communication. Establishes basic theoretical concepts and principles underlying the graduate program in Emerging Media and Communication.
R
7:00 pm - 9:45 pm
Olivia Banner
With the recent increase in wearable media in consumer markets, there has been much attention paid to devices, data tracking, and aesthetics. But what about the messages communicated and the bodies on which the media is worn? Or the labor and materials required to produce electronics and textiles? Or issues of access and consumerism? In this course, we will approach the topic of wearable media as cultural theorists and as critical makers. We will begin with a brief look at the social history of fashion and its historical intersections with media and technology. We will then explore more contemporary areas of intersection centered on issues of embodiment, identity and globalization. The final portion of the semester will be devoted to "learning by doing" in the production of socially-engaged and critically-informed wearable media projects. No sewing, electronics, or coding experience is necessary.
M
7:00 pm - 9:45 pm
Kim Knight
W
4:00 pm - 6:45 pm
Dean Terry
W
7:00 pm - 9:45 pm
Rosanna Guadaguo