Courses

Undergraduate Graduate
Introduction to the interdisciplinary study of mutual interactions between technology and the creative arts. Establishes basic theoretical concepts and principles underlying the graduate program in Arts and Technology. Required of all degree candidates in Arts and Technology.
W
7:00 pm - 9:45 pm
Thomas Linehan
W
7:00 pm - 9:45 pm
Maximilian Schich
Exploration of aesthetic principles underlying the interactive electronic arts, their relation to and divergence from aesthetic principles underlying traditional forms of artistic expression. Topics will include interactive games, animation, and new modes of narrative. Required of all degree candidates in Arts and Technology.
T
4:00 pm - 6:45 pm
Mihai Nadin
This course analyzes the evolution of aesthetic theories to provide a historical framework and explores interactive projects throughout the ages with a focus on those theories of aesthetics. Students gain an understanding of aesthetic theories in historical and cultural context. Students obtain the skills to analyze those theories and apply their approach to interactive content. Students survey interactive works, participate in round table discussions, give presentations and design a creative project. Students examine readings / web sites and report on their findings.
T
7:00 pm - 9:45 pm
Lucy Petrovic
Advanced study of the structure and design of digital, analog, narrative, and social game systems. Course focuses on theory, critical analysis, innovation, and prototype creation.
T
1:00 pm - 3:45 pm
Timothy Christopher
Advanced study of the computer game as cultural artifact, procedural system, social space, and artistic medium. (May be repeated for credit as topics vary to a maximum of 6 credit hours.)
M
7:00 pm - 9:45 pm
Adam Brackin
Exploration and application of advanced methods and techniques (literary, artistic, conceptual, and technical) involved in the development of interactive games. Includes participation in development team for creation of a prototype, vertical slice demo, or complete original game. (May be repeated for credit as topics vary to a maximum of 9 credit hours.)
T
1:00 pm - 3:45 pm
Monica Evans
Advanced development and production of digital, analog, narrative, and social games with emphasis on post-production techniques, including system balancing and tuning, rapid iteration, and commercial and independent business models. Includes participation in a development team for creation of a prototype, vertical slice demo, or complete original game
M
1:00 pm - 3:45 pm
Monica Evans
Exploration and application of advanced methods and techniques for the creation of visual images through the use of digital media. (May be repeated as topics vary to a maximum of 6 credit hours.)
R
1:00 pm - 3:45 pm
Kyle Kondas
W
4:00 pm - 6:45 pm
Kyle Kondas
F
1:00 pm - 3:45 pm
Todd Fechter
Exploration of advanced methods and techniques in motion capture animation. Course culminates in a professional-quality animation project. (May be repeated to a maximum of 6 credit hours.)
M
10:00 am - 12:45 pm
Midori Kitagawa
Exploration and application of advanced techniques in animation, visualization, simulation, and interactivity. (May be repeated for credit as topics vary to a maximum of 6 credit hours.)
MW
4:00 pm - 5:15 pm
Paul Fishwick
Advanced research in the conceptualization, creation, and application of interactive immersive environments, including research in synthetic spaces, interactive game engines, and hybrid physical/virtual worlds. (May be repeated for credit as topics vary to a maximum of 6 credit hours.)
R
1:00 pm - 3:45 pm
Scott Swearingen
Exploration and application of advanced concepts and techniques involved in the development of animated shorts and features. Includes participation in development team for creation of an animated short or feature-length animated film. (May be repeated for credit as topics vary to a maximum of 9 credit hours.)
T
10:00 am - 12:45 pm
Todd Fechter
Advanced research in the analysis and creation of interactive narrative systems, designs, and models through various philosophical and mechanical approaches. (May be repeated for credit as topics vary to a maximum of 9 credit hours.
W
7:00 pm - 9:45 pm
Adam Brackin
Theory, principles and practice of narratives created for distribution via digital media. Will include creation of both linear and nonlinear digital content for electronic distribution. (May be repeated to a maximum of 6 credit hours.)
T
7:00 pm - 9:45 pm
Cassini Nazir
Focuses on the study of emergent media from a theoretical frame, exploring the political, technological, cultural and historical forces which inform the way media and communication develop.
M
7:00 pm - 9:45 pm
Cuihua Shen
Exploration of the underlying psychological issues of users that can be taken into account in the design and assessment of interactive technologies, such as online personas, virtual humans and cultures, brain-computer or human-robotic interfaces, virtual workplaces, and e-behavior.
R
4:00 pm - 6:45 pm
Marjorie Zielke
"Making Sound and Music for Media" This course examines what is needed to "make" ... There is a cultural phenomenon in today's society that is referred to as "Makers". This includes anything from 3d printing to designing your own interactive media project. There are "Maker" fairs that are happening across the nation. This class is an opportunity to work in this sort of context. To focus on the skills and craft of making music. This can mean many things, but it mostly means focusing on creating a vision of something interesting that one would like to include in a final graduate portfolio that uses sound and putting together the resources and skills needed to MAKE that project happen. From the first class we will work together to understand what is needed to create new work in an audio context, then working in teams and on their own, students will pool those resources to MAKE new sounds, new music, ... new work. Pre-requisite: permission of the instructor
W
7:00 pm - 9:45 pm
Scott Gresham-Lancaster
An examination of the links between technology, play, and culture. Topics may include the ethics of game development, serious and persuasive games, simulation and training, interactive education, identity and culture in virtual worlds, multilinear narrative, and philosophical origins of games as a medium. (May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 6 credit hours.)
M
4:00 pm - 6:45 pm
Monica Evans
T
4:00 pm - 6:45 pm
Phillip Johnson
M
7:00 pm - 9:45 pm
Jacob Naasz
Producing Animation is a course designed to stimulate students to think globally about animated productions. The class will provide an overall understanding of all of the moving parts that have to come together in order to create different types of computer generated projects. An overall knowledge of the production process is extraordinarily valuable no matter what area of focus someone might choose. By the end of the semester everyone in the class will have the ability to take a creative concept and build a plan to execute the vision from script to final frames. Course topics will include…Defining the phases of production, budgeting, scheduling, tracking, etc. Students will ascertain what producers are looking for when hiring people and what it takes to build a long term successful career.
R
7:00 pm - 9:45 pm
Todd Fechter
Networks and history are intertwined: As we study history, we are confronted with a non-intuitive heterogeneity of complex networks. These complex networks connect things, concepts, individuals, locations, and events. Understanding the non-trivial dynamics and evolution of these networks becomes mission critical to historical inquiry. At the same time we have to deal with exponential or even super-exponential growth rates in our data. In this course we will combine qualitative and quantitative approaches to identify and tackle the challenges of networked phenomena throughout history. The course caters to and benefits from curious students with diverse backgrounds, such as ATEC, EMAC, and all flavors of Arts & Humanities. Coding, math, data wrangling, and visualization skills are welcome, while not necessary. Arts and Humanities students with more traditional backgrounds are equally encouraged to enrich the discussion.
R
4:00 pm - 6:45 pm
Maximilian Schich
This course presents students with a variety of research methods that are appropriate for advanced research in Arts and Technology. Methods will include ethnographic, experimental, descriptive, historical, and philosophical.
R
7:00 pm - 9:45 pm
Frank Dufour
W
4:00 pm - 6:45 pm
Mihai Nadin
T
7:00 pm - 9:45 pm
Cassini Nazir
This instance of EMAC6372 examines the implications of digital media on the ways in which people engage in community life. Students will survey the history, theory,empirical research of online communities and many of the Web 2.0 applications that are driving the growth of the social web. During the first half of the semester, students will read theoretical literature on community and communication from multiple disciplines.Classes in second half of the semester provide more in-depth examination of topic-specific online communities including gaming, health, and peer production. Although this course is grounded in theory, it is equally rooted in practice. Throughout the semester, students will be required to get familiar with various online social media tools and platforms, including blogs, wikis, social network sites, forums, virtual worlds,online games, and so on. Students will also work in teams to design communities using simple, readily available software. Therefore, the course will provide both theoretical and experiential foundations for social media researchers and practitioners to critically plan, design, implement, analyze, and participate in online communities.
M
7:00 pm - 9:45 pm
Cuihua Shen
T
4:00 pm - 6:45 pm
Dean Terry