Events

Previous Events

Wednesday, February 26,  7:00 PM 
Venue: ATEC Lecture Hall 
Ticket: Free 
Season: 2013-14

The Metroplex Technology Business Council Lecture - Presented by The Dallas Morning News


Christian Belady, general manager of Data Center Services for Microsoft’s Global Foundation Services and a UT Dallas alumnus, will speak at the Feb. 26 lecture. He oversees all aspects of Microsoft’s global data center network, including the expansion of new data centers and the development of new standards in energy efficiency that have been adopted across the industry. Belady earned a master’s degree at UT Dallas in 1990 and received the University’s Distinguished Alumni Award in 2010.

About the Lecture Series

The University of Texas at Dallas proudly introduces the new Arts and Technology Distinguished Lecture Series.

Hosted by UT Dallas’ Arts and Technology (ATEC) program, the series features speakers from a wide range of backgrounds in science, technology and art. They will present public lectures on topics aimed at exploring the evolving relationships among art, technology, engineering and behavioral and social sciences.

The new Edith O’Donnell Arts and Technology Building will be the lecture series’ home, offering audience members a view into the creative environment that serves to advance UT Dallas’ work at the research and educational frontiers of these coalescing disciplines.

 

Tickets

Ticket prices are $15 for seats on the lower level and $10 for the upper level. Purchase tickets online.

 

Parking

The University of Texas at Dallas is at 800 W. Campbell Road in Richardson, Texas.
Guests attending the lecture can enter campus from Campbell Road. Head north on University Parkway and 
turn right onto Armstrong Drive. Turn right onto East Drive, then left on Drive A to reach Parking Structure One. 

Directions to campus here.
Download parking map here.

 



For more information contact:
Deborah Day
debday@utdallas.edu
972-883-6504 

Patrons with disabilities who need special assistance, such as an interpreter or captioning, to attend this presentation should contact us no later than 72 hours prior to the presentation.
Wednesday, March 26,  7:00 PM 
Venue: ATEC Lecture Hall 
Ticket: Free 
Season: 2013-14

The Ericsson Lecture - Presented by The Dallas Morning News


Vint Cerf, recognized as one of the “fathers of the Internet” and vice president and chief Internet evangelist at Google, will speak on March 26. Cerf has received such honors as the National Medal of Technology, the Turing Award, and the Presidential Medal of Freedom for his role in the creation of the Internet. In his work at Google, Cerf identifies and promotes new technologies used to develop Internet-based products and services.

About the Lecture Series

The University of Texas at Dallas proudly introduces the new Arts and Technology Distinguished Lecture Series.

Hosted by UT Dallas’ Arts and Technology (ATEC) program, the series features speakers from a wide range of backgrounds in science, technology and art. They will present public lectures on topics aimed at exploring the evolving relationships among art, technology, engineering and behavioral and social sciences.

The new Edith O’Donnell Arts and Technology Building will be the lecture series’ home, offering audience members a view into the creative environment that serves to advance UT Dallas’ work at the research and educational frontiers of these coalescing disciplines.

 

Tickets

Ticket prices are $15 for seats on the lower level and $10 for the upper level. Purchase tickets online.

 

Parking

The University of Texas at Dallas is at 800 W. Campbell Road in Richardson, Texas.
Guests attending the lecture can enter campus from Campbell Road. Head north on University Parkway and 
turn right onto Armstrong Drive. Turn right onto East Drive, then left on Drive A to reach Parking Structure One. 

Directions to campus here.
Download parking map here.

 



For more information contact:
Deborah Day
debday@utdallas.edu
972-883-6504 

Patrons with disabilities who need special assistance, such as an interpreter or captioning, to attend this presentation should contact us no later than 72 hours prior to the presentation.
Wednesday, April 16,  7:00 PM 
Venue: ATEC Lecture Hall 
Ticket: Free 
Season: 2013-14

The Northwood Woman’s Club Lecture - Presented by The Dallas Morning News


Mae Jemison, a chemical engineer, scientist, physician, entrepreneur, teacher and astronaut, will speak on April 16. She was the first African-American woman to enter NASA’s astronaut corps and flew aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1992. Jemison is multi-lingual, trained in dance and choreography, and recognized nationally as an advocate for advancing STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) education for children.

About the Lecture Series

The University of Texas at Dallas proudly introduces the new Arts and Technology Distinguished Lecture Series.

Hosted by UT Dallas’ Arts and Technology (ATEC) program, the series features speakers from a wide range of backgrounds in science, technology and art. They will present public lectures on topics aimed at exploring the evolving relationships among art, technology, engineering and behavioral and social sciences.

The new Edith O’Donnell Arts and Technology Building will be the lecture series’ home, offering audience members a view into the creative environment that serves to advance UT Dallas’ work at the research and educational frontiers of these coalescing disciplines.

 

Tickets

Ticket prices are $15 for seats on the lower level and $10 for the upper level. Purchase tickets online.

 

Parking

The University of Texas at Dallas is at 800 W. Campbell Road in Richardson, Texas.
Guests attending the lecture can enter campus from Campbell Road. Head north on University Parkway and 
turn right onto Armstrong Drive. Turn right onto East Drive, then left on Drive A to reach Parking Structure One. 

Directions to campus here.
Download parking map here.

 

 



For more information contact:
Deborah Day
debday@utdallas.edu
972-883-6504 

Patrons with disabilities who need special assistance, such as an interpreter or captioning, to attend this presentation should contact us no later than 72 hours prior to the presentation.
Wednesday, January 22,  7:00 PM 
Venue: ATEC Lecture Hall 
Ticket: Varies 
Season: 2013-14

The Susan and Ron Nash Lecture - Presented by The Dallas Morning News


Robert Edsel, writer of the acclaimed book, The Monuments Men: Allied Heroes, Nazi Thieves and the Greatest Treasure Hunt in History, will kick off the lecture series on Jan. 22. Edsel’s book follows the efforts of a special Allied force – comprised of art historians, curators and architects – with a mission of tracking and retrieving art, historic documents and other cultural treasures stolen by the Nazis during World War II. Actor and director George Clooney’s movie, The Monuments Men is based on Edsel’s book and is scheduled to premiere on Feb. 7.

About the Lecture Series

The University of Texas at Dallas proudly introduces the new Arts and Technology Distinguished Lecture Series.

Hosted by UT Dallas’ Arts and Technology (ATEC) program, the series features speakers from a wide range of backgrounds in science, technology and art. They will present public lectures on topics aimed at exploring the evolving relationships among art, technology, engineering and behavioral and social sciences.

The new Edith O’Donnell Arts and Technology Building will be the lecture series’ home, offering audience members a view into the creative environment that serves to advance UT Dallas’ work at the research and educational frontiers of these coalescing disciplines.

 

Tickets

Ticket prices are $15 for seats on the lower level and $10 for the upper level. Purchase tickets online.

 

Parking

The University of Texas at Dallas is at 800 W. Campbell Road in Richardson, Texas.
Guests attending the lecture can enter campus from Campbell Road. Head north on University Parkway and 
turn right onto Armstrong Drive. Turn right onto East Drive, then left on Drive A to reach Parking Structure One. 

Directions to campus here.
Download parking map here.

 



For more information contact:
Deborah Day
debday@utdallas.edu
972-883-6504 

Patrons with disabilities who need special assistance, such as an interpreter or captioning, to attend this presentation should contact us no later than 72 hours prior to the presentation.

Eric Farrar, Assistant Professor

Exploring Applications for Non-narrative Animation

Abstract:  This talk will feature work being done on an ongoing collaborative research project between ATEC, Computer Science, BBS and the Callier Center for Communication Disorders.  The project utilizes motion capture technology along with tools and techniques normally used in film and game production to create a clinical tool for speech therapy.  The talk will explore additional uses and applications for 3D animation in non-narrative capacities.

Bio:  Eric Farrar is an Assistant Professor of Computer Animation in the Arts and Technology (ATEC) program at UT Dallas.  With a background in music and visual communication design, he completed an MFA in Computer Animation and Visualization working through the Advanced Computing Center for Art and Design (ACCAD) at The Ohio State University. He then went to work for the Los Angeles based visual-effects studio, Rhythm & Hues where he worked as a character rigger, creating bone and muscle systems for digital characters.  Films on which he worked include Night at the Museum and The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, Witch and the Wardrobe.  Eric is currently teaching courses in 3D animation including the Animation Production Studio course as well as courses focused on character rigging, which introduce students to some of the more technical elements of preparing 3D models for animation.

Art & Invention

by

Michael Naimark

Abstract:  Artists and designers sometimes invent - new processes, media, or technologies - in the name of realizing their work. Invention isn't the primary motivation, and the works are often clunky, frugal, and just barely working (but working!). Broader, practical, or commercial applications are usually far from the artist's mind. Meanwhile, and perhaps ironically, large research and commercial institutions spend billions of dollars per year on invention, often in the same arenas. So the critical question is: how do artists fit in? We will explore this question - and such issues as control and compromise; ownership and intellectual property; time horizon and profitability; and cultural consequence and hegemony - mining my art projects and experiences for lessons learned.

Biography:  Michael Naimark is a media artist and researcher who's been blessed (and sometimes cursed) with an uncanny track record of art projects presaging widespread adoption, often by decades. He is noted in the histories of Google Street ViewProjection Mapping, and Virtual Reality (and, some claim, the Facebook Like Button); and in ongoing work with cinematic crowdsourcinglive global video, and cultural heritage. Michael's immersive and interactive art installations have exhibited internationally and are in the permanent collections of American Museum of the Moving Image, the Exploratorium, and the ZKM Center for Arts and Media. He was the recipient of the World Technology Award for the Arts in 2002 and was guest curator at Ars Electronica in 2004 and 2009. In recent years he's served as faculty at USC Cinema, NYU Art, and the MIT Media Lab.

We announce a special ATEC colloquium on Monday, October 13, starting at noon.   Location: ATC 3.914

These speakers are attending The Society for Literature, Science and the Arts Conference in Dallas on October 9-12 and have agreed to speak on this day for a special ATEC Colloquium.

Wendy Silk: Engaging Undergraduates in Environmental Sciences Via the Arts - She is Professor Emerita and Distinguished ArtScientist in the Department of Land, Air, and Water Resources at the University of California at Davis and involved in the campus ArtScience Fusion Program.  Her talk will review results of a networking grant from the National Science Foundation and describe how students learn environmental science through songwriting and performance.

Jack Ox: Fluxus/Fluid Coursing through an artist-scientist who came after: A Cognitive analysis of Rich Gold’s Interdisciplinary work. - She is an Associate Research Professor, Department of Music, College of Fine Arts, University of New Mexico

David Familian: Disrupting the Mirro: New Interfaces/Embodied Experiences - Artistic Director, Beall Center for the Arts, University of California Irvine

Algorithmic and Aesthetics – On Digital Images

Frieder Nake

University of Bremen & University of the Arts Bremen, Germany

Abstract: Computer art is now about 50 years old. As in McLuhan’s famous slogan, its early attempts were examples of the medium being the message. The algorithmic principle, essence of computing science, became the driving force for this approach to art. We will review important events and examples of the first years of computer art. It established itself as a very special aspect of conceptual art. Only with interactive art, however, digital art gained enough of autonomy and started formulating its own aesthetic questions. We will take a look at generative aesthetics, and show some, perhaps surprising, connections to the broad stream of art history, e.g. Monet, Mondrian, Pollock, Albers, Götz, G. Richter.

Biography:  Frieder Nake is a mathematician who happens to be called an artist, but a computer scientist as well. The second is trivial, the first not quite. He has done early pioneering work in computer art. He is a professor of interactive computer graphics and digital media, teaching at the University of Bremen, Germany, and the University of the Arts Bremen. He has taught in Canada for some years, and many more countries, Norway and China among them. He was recently one of many nominees for the new Visionary Pioneer of Media Art award of Prix Ars Electronica.

Learn more about Arts and Humanities faculty! Faculty members will present short lectures on their areas of interest, research and courses. Previous topics have included crowdsourcing, religion and politics, visual sampling, and internet art.

What is it? 
When should I begin? 
What do I do? 
Who should supervise?

Join ATEC and EMAC advisors and faculty for this discussion about capstone preparation.  Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors are encouraged to attend.  It is never too early to start thinking about your capstone project.

A panel of ATEC and EMAC alumni will discuss their careers and how they have used their degrees.  Following the panel discussion, a networking session will be held with various representatives from companies in the DFW area.