NEWS

Which EMAC 4372 class is right for you?

April 01, 2013

Class registration opened this morning and for Fall 2013 we are offering two sections of the special topics course EMAC 4372. You may be asking yourself what course is the better fit for you? Below are the course descriptions for Dave Parry’s course as well as Andrew Famiglietti’s course to help you decide which one is the best fit for you.

EMAC 4372.002: Unlike prior forms of broadcast media, the digital network distributes the means of production and dissemination within the populace as a whole, replacing one to many communication with the many-to-many. While by no means egalitarian, the shift away from broadcast media to a more distributed form opens up a range of possibilities for communities to leverage the digital network and computational technologies to not only to communicate with each other but to work to solve their own problems.In this class we are going to work to understand how the digital network can foster civic engagement, and be purposed to solve a wide range of citizen concerns.To accomplish this goal, the class is divided into three sections: theory, research, and practice. In the first part of class we will read some of the key works on community building and the media’s role in empowering/disempowering citizens, with particular focus on the effect the digital network is having. Second, we will look at particular examples of Citizen Media and research what groups are doing, what has worked, and what has not. Finally the class will work in groups to make their own Civic Media projects. (class taught by Dave Parry)

EMAC 4372.001:This EMAC 4372 teaches basic computer programming literacy with an eye towards the humanistic application of digital tools and techniques. With this goal in mind, EMAC 4372 focuses on the practical application of higher level scripting languages to tasks common in the humanities. Students will learn basic code design patterns, regular expressions, and web API use, and practice applying these tools to real-world research and communication tasks. (class taught by Andrew Famiglietti)