School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences

Heidi S. Kane

Assistant Professor

Research Interests

The associations between close relationships and health; stress, coping and social support processes in couples

Curriculum Vitae

Contact

Email: heidi.kane@utdallas.edu
Phone: 972-883-4469
Office: JO_3.216
Campus Mail Code: GR41
Website: Close Relationships and Health Lab

Biography

Dr. Heidi Kane’s research examines how social and cognitive processes shape interpersonal experiences and how these experiences then impact relationship dynamics and health. She is particularly interested in the biopsychosocial pathways through which close relationships influence health-related outcomes such as sleep and maternal and infant health. Some of her current research has examined the associations between daily relationship experiences and sleep among married couples and the psychosocial processes associated with cortisol among youth with asthma and pregnant women. She has also examined stress and coping processes in couples with a special emphasis on social support processes using an attachment theoretical perspective. Dr. Kane received her bachelor’s degree from Rhodes College and her PhD from the University of California Santa Barbara.

Recent and Selected Representative Publications

Recent Articles in Peer-Refereed Journals

Tobin, E.T., Kane, H.S., Saleh, D.J., Wildman, D.E., Breen, E.C., Secord, E., & Slatcher, R.B. (2015) Asthma-related immune responses in youth with asthma: Associations with maternal responsiveness and expressions of positive and negative affect in daily life. Psychosomatic Medicine, 77, 892-902.

Kane, H.S., Dunkel Schetter, C., Glynn, L., Hobel, C. & Sandman, C. (2014). Pregnancy anxiety and prenatal cortisol trajectories. Biological Psychology, 100, 13-19.

Kane, H.S., Slatcher, R.B., Reynolds, B., Repetti, R. & Robles, T.F. (2014). Daily self-disclosure and sleep behavior in couples. Health Psychology, 33, 813-822.

Kane, H.S., McCall, C., Collins, N.L. & Blascovich, J.A. (2012). Mere presence is not enough: Responsive support in a virtual world. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 48(1), 37-44.