School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences

Chandramallika Basak

Assistant Professor

Research Interests

Attentional control and working memory, cognitive training strategies, neural and cognitive predictors of complex skill acquisition, and aging

Curriculum Vitae

Biography

Dr. Chandra Basak is one of the leading researchers in the area of working memory and cognitive control, training strategies, cognitive and brain plasticity, aging, and biomarkers of complex skill learning (e.g., video games). Her recent working memory theory has opened the door to a new discovery on how to improve cognition in older adults by accounting for switch expectancies. Dr. Basak’s previous research has focused on cognitive plasticity, changing brain function/structure through cognitive training (e.g., video game, working memory), and fitness training. She also has researched switching in working memory and aging, biomarkers of training/learning, and statistical modeling. Dr. Basak received the Early Career Researcher Award from the Cognitive Aging Conference, the Beckman Institute Postdoctoral Fellowship, and the Outstanding Dissertation Award from Syracuse University. She earned her bachelor’s degree from the University of Calcutta in India, master’s degrees from the University of Calcutta and Syracuse University, and her PhD from Syracuse University..

Recent and Selected Representative Publications

Recent Articles in Peer-Refereed Journals

Band, G.P.H., Basak, C., Slatger, H.A., & Voss, M.W. (In press). Editorial: Towards a mechanistic view on game-guided learning. Frontiers of Human Neuroscience.

Basak, C. & O’Connell, M.A. (2016). To switch or not to switch: Role of cognitive control in working memory training in older adults. Special issue on The Temporal Dynamics of Cognitive Processing, Frontiers in Psychology, 7 (230), 1-18. 10.3389/fpsyg.2016.00230

Wong, C., N., Chaddock-Heyman, L., Voss, M.W., Burzynska, A.Z., Basak, C., Erickson, K.I., Prakash, R.S., Szabo-Reed, A., Philliips, A., Wojcicki, T., Mailey, E.L., McAuley, E., Kramer, A. (2015) Brain activation during dual-task processing is associated with cardiorespiratory fitness and performance in older adults. Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, 7, 154. 10.3389/fnagi.2015.00154

View more