School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences

IN PRINT AND ON AIR ARCHIVE

In Print & On Air includes general interest media coverage of BBS students, faculty, staff and leadership and their achievements. This is the archive of articles from 2016 and 2015.


CBSDFW.com

UT Dallas Working On Better Treatment Options For Brain Injuries

Nov 11, 2016

“We think this is going to revolutionize how we detect brain injuries and how we detect changes in brain performance.” — Dr. Robert Rennaker, Texas Instruments Distinguished Chair in Bioengineering, professor of electrical engineering and professor of neuroscience. read more


Martha Stewart

Minding Your Memory: How to Keep Your Brain Sharp

Nov 3, 2016

“It’s somewhat paradoxical that we remember the few things we forget each day but fail to acknowledge how many things our brains succeed in remembering.” — Dr. Sandra Bond Chapman, Dee Wyly Distinguished University Chair and professor and founder and chief director at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences’ Center for BrainHealth. read more


mysanantonio.com

Dallas Center Helps Young Autistic Children Trick-or-Treat

Oct 27, 2016

With Halloween approaching, young children with autism spectrum disorder attending a class at a Dallas center (The Callier Center for Communication Disorders) have spent the week getting comfortable with the concept of trick-or-treating. read more


Fox 4 news

Should Parents Worry About Halloween Candy?

Oct 26, 2016

Collecting Halloween candy is the fun part, but some parents stress over how much their children can eat. Jenny McGlothin specializes in childhood feeding. She works at the UT Dallas Callier Center for Communication Disorders. read more

Related story – Why Halloween Candy isn’t as Scary as You Might Think – DallasNews.com


The Dallas Morning News

Why You Shouldn’t be Afraid of Fear. Hint: It Could Save Your Life

Oct 24, 2016

“When you have the fright, when something jumps out at you, there’s a natural response where adrenaline is released, It’s fight or flight. It’s adaptive and helps us to be quick. It gives us extra strength and stamina, increases our heart rate and sends blood to muscles to fight long and hard and run fast.” — Dr. Christa McIntyre, associate professor in cognition and neuroscience and program head of neuroscience BS. read more


D Magazine

Robert Rennaker Wants to Rewire Your Brain

Oct 2016

“What I bring to the table is an assessment of what needs to be done to help people. As a former Marine, I am acutely aware of our veterans and the price they have paid.” — Dr. Robert Rennaker, Texas Instruments Distinguished Chair in Bioengineering, professor of electrical engineering and professor of neuroscience. read more


The Today Show

Can Virtual Reality Help Teens Deal with Social Anxiety, ADHD, and More?

Sep 20, 2016

TODAY, special anchor Maria Shriver visits a teen socialization lab at the University of Texas at Dallas, where a virtual reality program helps teens develop their social skills despite such challenges as ADHD and Asperger’s syndrome. read more


The Dallas Morning News

Navy SEAL-Turned-Scientist Works to Solve the Puzzle of Battlefield Brain Injuries

Aug 10, 2016

“Getting a Ph.D. is much more difficult than becoming a SEAL,” he said. “It’s more challenging.” Knowledge of the brain changes every day. “I could do six months of research and by that seventh month everything I learned could be negated.” — Morgan Luttrell, a doctoral student in the program in cognitive neuroscience at the School of Behavorial and Brain Sciences. read more


NBCDFW.com

Summer Camp in Collin County for Kids With Cochlear Implants

Jul 28, 2016

“I think the hardest thing for me to do is when there are people overlapping talking, I can’t hear what they’re saying and it’s really frustrating.” read more


ASHA.org

UT Dallas Partnership Tackles SLP Shortage in Urban Areas

Jul 2016

“The cornerstone of the program involves an early literacy support program, where supervised graduate students—those who have already completed their pediatric on-campus practicum—provide early literacy intervention in low-performing schools.” read more


PublicationName

Ready. Set. Learn.

Jun 20, 2016

“Some kids can wait the entire 150 seconds of the experiment, and they use a lot of creative strategies to distract themselves. But others pick up the car as soon as the researcher leaves the room.” read more


Star-Telegram

Texas Can Solve the Problem of Chronic Pain

Jun 13, 2016

“With so many Americans suffering from chronic pain, and with such a strong research base in Texas, the time is right for statewide initiatives toward developing new therapies for the treatment of chronic pain.” read more


The Boston Globe

New Research Shows Being Busy is Good for Your Brain

May 18, 2016

“Individuals who reported greater day-to-day busyness tended to have better processing speed, working memory, episodic memory, reasoning, and crystallized knowledge, and these relationships persisted after controlling for age” — Sara Festini, a postdoctoral scientist at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences’ Center for Vital Longevity. read more


WebMD

Could This Nerve Transform Medicine?

Apr 12, 2016

“We see it as a potential approach for all neurological and psychiatric disorders” — Dr. Mike Kilgard, Margaret Fonde Jonsson Chair and professor of neuroscience. read more


Fox 4 news

Milo Autism Robot

Apr 11, 2016

Kids on the autism spectrum have a hard time with social interaction. But real progress is being made thanks to a robot produced by a Dallas company. In this FOX 4Ward, Dan Godwin talks with a UT-Dallas researcher who is helping to bring Milo to life. — Dr. Pamela Rollins, associate professor at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences’ Callier Center for Communication Disorders. read more


EurekAlert

Researcher Finds Potential New Source for Pain Inhibition

Apr 4, 2016

“From a basic science perspective, we’re really excited about it because it demonstrates that the types of GABAergic plasticity that can occur in the setting of chronic pain are more diverse than we’ve appreciated before” — Dr. Ted Price, associate professor of neuroscience. read more


Dallas Innovates

Investing in Dallas’ Future Leaders by Igniting Brain Potential

Mar 31, 2016

“In fact, our research at the Center for BrainHealth at The University of Texas at Dallas reveals that the detrimental effects of poverty on cognition can be mitigated and potentially overcome after short-term, targeted intervention” — Dr. Sandra Bond Chapman, Dee Wyly Distinguished University Chair and professor and founder and chief director at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences’ Center for BrainHealth. read more


WFAA.com

Health Headlines: Medicaid Expansion, Hearing Success

Mar 28, 2016

Medicaid expansion could have a positive impact on mental health in Texas; and a formerly deaf toddler hears for the first time — video of a toddler’s first experience with a cochlear implant at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences’ Callier Center for Communication Disorders. read more


The Washington Post

What One Snarky Facial Expression Could Teach us About the Evolution of Language

Mar 28, 2016

“In evolutionary terms, we tend to think about language overtaking expression and non-linguistic vocalization as the primary form of human communication — and forget the importance of facial expression . . . in understanding how humans ultimately ended up evolving toward language” — Dr. Alice O’Toole, Aage and Margareta Moller Professor and professor of neuroscience. read more


Reuters

Little Research Into Benefits of Wearing Earplugs to Concerts

Mar 7, 2016

“Little research into benefits of wearing earplugs to concerts” — Dr. Colleen Le Prell, the Emilie and Phil Schepps Professor of Hearing Science and Professor and Program Head of Audiology AuD. read more


The Shorthorn

Psychology Professor: Cognitive Training Can Improve Brain Preservation

Mar 4, 2016

“If the training is easy or predictable, it is ineffective because it is not exercising cognitive training, because it is meant to mimic life and life is unpredictable” — Dr. Chandramallika Basak, assistant professor of psychology at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences’ Center for Vital Longevity. read more


EurekAlert

Brain Connectivity Disruptions May Explain Cognitive Deficits in People With Brain Injury

Mar 1, 2016

“If key brain networks cannot interact in a normal way, the brain becomes inefficient. Our future research will examine how networks can be improved or enhanced, even after a traumatic brain injury, with cognitive intervention” — Dr. Daniel Krawczyk, Debbie and Jim Francis Chair and associate professor of cognitive neuroscience and cognitive psychology at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences’ Center for BrainHealth. read more


Scientific American

Do Teething Toys Disrupt How Babies Learn Language

Mar 1, 2016

“Participants were more likely to make the sound correctly when they had this visual feedback. The technology might help people improve pronunciation in a second language or even relearn speech after a stroke” — Dr. William Katz, professor of speech science and neurolinguistics. read more


The Dallas Morning News

Yes, Your Teenager’s Brain is Crazy

Feb 29, 2016

“Kids can be very frustrating, but it is up to the adults to keep their act together. Some parents go nuts about having too many rules. It’s about figuring out what’s most important to your family. And teenagers can help make the rules and even make some of the consequences” — Dr. Jacque Gamino, director of the BrainHealth Adolescent Reasoning Initiative. read more


Your Teen Mag

4 Strategies to Help With Mean Middle Schoolers

Feb 2016

“Mean behavior takes a variety of forms, but when researchers and policy makers say “bully,” they mean something very specific” — Dr. Marion Underwood, Ashbel Smith Professor, dean of graduate studies and associate provost. read more


CBSDFW.com

DISD Partners With UTD to Help Children Overcome Language Barriers

Feb 18, 2016

“There’s a serious shortage of speech and language experts-forcing district officials to pay top dollar to provide those services to students through contractors. UTD has also provided curriculum at DISD’s nationally recognized Townview magnet to help encourage students to enter the field and hopefully return to DISD to use those skills” — Jessica Carter, senior lecturer at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences’ Callier Center for Communications Disorders. read more


NBCDFW.com

High-Fat Foods Affect Brain Health: UTD Researchers

Feb 15, 2016

“Diet really does have a significant impact on your brain, and it degrades brain function. What it looks like we’re doing with a high-fat diet is aging the brain prematurely” — Dr. Tres Thompson, associate professor of neuroscience. read more


Reuters

Out of Shape in Middle Age May Mean a Smaller Brain Later

Feb 10, 2016

“People who haven’t started exercising by 40 can still get moving. Some sedentary people 50 and older who start workout routines may see improved cognition and neural health after as little as 6 weeks of aerobic exercise” — Dr. Sandra Bond Chapman, Dee Wyly Distinguished University Chair and professor and founder and chief director at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences’ Center for BrainHealth. read more


Wallethub.com

2016’s Best and Worst Cities to Get Married

Feb 2016

“Start 6-9 months before the wedding contacting venues, florists, photographers, etc. to get the best people for the price. I recommend that noone go into debt to finance a wedding” — Dr. Karen Prager, professor of psychology. read more


The New York Time Well Blog

The Health Benefits of Knitting

Jan 25, 2016

In support of that suggestion, a 2014 study by Denise C. Park of the University of Texas at Dallas and colleagues demonstrated that learning to quilt or do digital photography enhanced memory function in older adults. Those who engaged in activities that were not intellectually challenging, either in a social group or alone, did not show such improvements — Dr. Denise C. Park, Distinguished University Chair in Behavioral and Brain Sciences and director of research at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences’ Center for Vital Longevity. read more


D Magazine

Why You Need to Know Sandra Bond Chapman

Jan 2016

“We need to help people realize that their notions of the brain are outdated, and we need to quickly change the way we view brain health. We still have this fixed notion about our brain being a system that is supportive, but it is much more than that. The amazing adaptability, modifiability, and trainability of the brain shows that it is really not a fixed system at all” — Dr. Sandra Bond Chapman, Dee Wyly Distinguished University Chair and professor and founder and chief director at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences’ Center for BrainHealth. read more


The New York Times Parenting Blog

Parents Monitoring Teenagers Online, and Mostly, Getting It Right

Jan 7, 2016

“Children who felt like their parents were monitoring their activity online were noticeably less distressed by online conflict. Particularly early in our children’s online lives, we should also monitor, but openly. When we help our children learn to socialize in this domain, we help them moderate their own behavior, and also help them put the world of the Internet into context as just one piece of a much greater whole” — Dr. Marion Underwood, Ashbel Smith Professor, dean of graduate studies and associate provost. read more


WebMD.com

How to Handle MS “Brain Fog”

Jan 2016

“The problem is that communication breaks down between your brain cells and the blood vessels that provide the nutrients that help them work. That makes it harder for your brain to do its job” — Dr. Bart Rypma, Meadows Foundation Chair and associate professor of cognitive neuroscience and cognitive psychology. read more


Fox 4 News

Social Media Research by UT Dallas Professor

Dec 26, 2015

A UT Dallas Professor is getting national attention for her research on into teenagers and social media — video interview with Dr. Marion Underwood, Ashbel Smith Professor, dean of graduate studies and associate provost. read more


Labmanager.com

Advancing Cellular Imaging with Digital User-Friendly Systems

Dec 8, 2015

“We are an undergraduate institution, so besides having graduate students and postdoctoral fellows, we have a lot of undergraduate students working in our labs. These students have no experience doing cell imaging, and although they can be trained, it’s a little nerve-racking to have them start working on a $300,000 confocal microscope. The digital cell imager is a small epifluorescent microscope that is relatively new and inexpensive. Using this, the students can hone their skills and see whether their experiment is working, and it provides very good images given its size and cost” — Dr. Ted Price, associate professor of neuroscience. read more

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