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School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences - The University of Texas at Dallas

Faculty Research in Press

MARGARET OWEN

 

Margaret Owen

Dr. Margaret Owen, Robinson Family Professor, co-authored a study in Addictive Behaviors exploring the impact of socioeconomic mobility on adolescent use of alcohol and tobacco.

 

Looking at data from the 15-year longitudinal NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development, the researchers examined how changes in a family's socioeconomic status were related to tobacco and alcohol use. Adolescents whose families were disadvantaged economically at any time between when they were 10 and 15 years old were most likely to report smoking at age 15. Adolescents from families that went from economically advantaged to disadvantaged over this five year period were most likely to have consumed alcohol.

 

According to the authors, the findings from this study may have important implications for those, including policy makers, interested in substance abuse prevention.

 

Article: Family income trajectory during childhood is associated with adolescent cigarette smoking and alcohol use

 

 

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MANDY MAGUIRE

 

Mandy Maguire

Dr. Mandy Maguire, associate professor in the School of Behavior and Brain Sciences, recently coauthored a study published in the Journal of Psycholinguistic Research looking at the mistakes people make when deciding what words to use in completing a sentence.

 

Using a sentence completion task, Maguire and her colleagues presented 238 undergraduates with sentences missing either a verb or a noun at the end of it and asked the students to fill in the missing word. When the students made a mistake filling in a missing noun, they typically picked a word within the same category as the target word, like mixing up "dress" for "jacket". They also found students were more likely to mistakenly use an out-of-category verb instead of the target verb, like "drink" for "hear". Conclusions drawn from analyzing the differences in the mistakes suggest that nouns and verbs are remembered differently.

 

According to Maguire, these findings are important in helping to identify what makes recalling a word easy or difficult and could have important implications for patients who have disorders that include word finding problems.

 

UT Dallas researchers Alysson Abel, Fizza Naqvi, and Angela Kim were also authors on this paper.

 

Article: "Lexical retrieval of nouns and verbs in a sentence completion task. Journal of Psycholinguistic Research"

 

 

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