School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences

Social Communication Lab

PUBLICATIONS

2016

Rollins, P. R. (2016). Words are not enough: Providing the context for social communication and interaction. Topics in Language Disorders, 36 (3), 198-216.

Abstract

This article elucidates the unfolding of 3 phases of cognitive development through which typical children move during the first 2 years of life to illuminate the interrelationships among early cognition, communicative intention, and word-learning strategies. The resulting theoretical framework makes clear the developmental prerequisites for social communication and sheds light on how some children with autism spectrum disorder can learn words and phrases but fail to develop true social language. This framework is then applied to a case example of a child called Henry, using data from 10-min videos of clinician–child interaction that was collected each week to evaluate the child’s progress in social communication while working with his graduate-student clinician. Eye-tracking data also were collected as an indirect measure of eye contact. The data showed that Henry made progress in social engagement, reciprocal verbal interactions, and diversity of communicative intentions. In addition, eye-tracking data suggested an increase in eye contact commensurate with a typical age mate. Implications for social communication intervention are discussed.

Rollins, P. R., Campbell, M., Hoffman, R.T., & Self, K. A (2016) A Community-Based Early Intervention Program for Toddlers with Autism Spectrum Disorders, Autism: The International Journal of Research and Practice. 20 (2), 219-232.
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Abstract

This study examined Pathways, a community-based, parent-mediated, intensive behavioral and developmental intervention program for children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) that could be used as a model for state-funded early intervention programs. A single-subject, multiple baseline across participants design was used. Four boys with ASD and their mothers participated. Interventionists made weekly home visits and worked with caregivers to establish and maintain face-to-face reciprocal social interaction and eye contact. Each session included a 10-minute video of parent-child interaction. Evidence of intervention effectiveness was measured by percentage of non-overlapping data points. Social validity was measured using questionnaire items in regard to parents’ perception of the intervention. The intervention was effective for the measures of eye contact, social engagement, and verbal reciprocity but not for nonverbal turn taking. Parents perceived the intervention as beneficial and easy to learn and incorporate into daily life.

2014

Rollins, P.R., (2014). Facilitating Early Social Communication: From Theory to Practice. Shawnee Mission, KS: Autism & Aspergers Publishing Company.
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Rollins, P. R. (2014). Narrative Skills in Young Adults With High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders. Communication Disorders Quarterly, 36(1) 21-28.
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Rollins, P.R. (2014). Personal Narratives in Individuals with High-Functioning ASD: A Lens Into Social Skills. Perspectives on Language Learning and Education, 21(1), 13-20.
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Rollins, P.R. (2014). Developmental Pragmatics. In Y. Huang (Ed). Handbook of Pragmatics. Oxford University Press (web edition).

Rollins, P.R., & McFarlin, M.N., (2014). Robots4Autism. Teaching Social Skills For Life: Facilitator’s Manual. Dallas, TX: Robokind.

Rollins, P.R., & McFarlin, M.N., (2014, October). Social Robotics: Technology-aided Instruction. Advance Healthcare Network and Hearing.
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2013

Rollins & Greenwald (2013). Affect Attunement during Mother-Infant Interaction: How Specific Intensities Predict the Stability of Infants’ Joint Attention. In Imagination, Cognition and Personality 32 (4), 339-366.

Most Cited Articles

Rollins, P. R., (2003). Caregiver contingent comments and subsequent vocabulary Comprehension. Applied Psycholinguistics, 24, 221-234.

Moller, A., R., & Rollins, P.R.. (2002). The non-classical auditory pathways are involved in hearing in children but not in adults. Neuroscience Letters. 319, 41-44.
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Rollins, P. R., & Snow, C. E. (1998). Shared attention and grammatical development in typical children and children with autism. Journal of Child Language, 25, 653-674.
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Rollins, P. R., Wambacq, I., Dowell, D., Mathues, L., & Reese, P. B. (1998). An intervention technique for children with Autistic Spectrum Disorders: Joint attentional routines. Journal of Communication Disorders, Special Issue on Autism, 31, 181-193.
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Rollins, P. R., Snow, C. E., & Willett, J. B. (1996). Predictors of MLU: Semantic and morphological developments. First Language, 16, 243-259.
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McCabe, A., & Rollins, P. R. (1994). Assessment of preschool narrative skills. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 3(1), 45-56.
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Ninio, A., Snow, C. E., Pan, B. A., & Rollins, P. R. (1994). Classifying communicative acts in children’s interactions. Journal of Communication Disorders, 27, 157-187.
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