Comet Calendar, The Official Event Calendar for UT Dallas http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/rss.php en-us This week's events for Arts & Humanities at UT Dallas Zsuzsanna Ozsvth & Frederick Turner read from their new book: Light within the Shade Eight Hundred Years of Hungarian Poetry http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220414443?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220414443?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS Wednesday, Oct 22
(5 p.m.)

Dr. Zsuzsanna Ozsváth and Dr. Fred Turner will be presenting a reading from their new book, Light Within the Shade, Eight Hundred Years of Hungarian Poetry on Wednesday, October 22nd at 5pm in JO3.516. This event is free and open to the public.

"Our claims of multiculturalism will remain ever empty, as long as smaller literatures are unknown to us. Turner and Ozsváth decided to do something about it. This anthology of Hungarian poems is exemplary: of high aesthetic quality, tasteful choice, and greatest practical use."—Virgil Nemoianu, Catholic University of America

 

** Parking Garage 3 is now open on Rutford Ave. Visitors may park on the first level, white spaces. This is Pay-By-Space parking.**
Please visit this website for directions, parking regulations and construction updates. www.utdallas.edu/visit

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New Directions in Latin American Literary & Cultural Studies http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220414562?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220414562?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS Friday, Oct 24
(9 a.m.)

9:00 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.

Abraham Acosta
University of Arizona
“Thresholds of Illiteracy: Cultural Difference, Subalternity, Infrapolitics”

Erin Graff Zivin
University of Southern California
“Marrano Secrets”

1:15 p.m. - 5:45 p.m.

Responses by:

Daniela Abraham
Peter Baker
Yoandy Cabrera
Christopher Conway
Eugenio DiStefano
Charles Hatfield
Andy Lantz
Alberto Moreiras
Belén Castañon Moreschi
Rubria Rocha de Luna
Michela Russo
Emilio Sauri
Sam Steinberg
Guillermo García Ureña
José Valero
Teresa Vilarós

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reflex soul http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220414195?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220414195?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS Friday, Sep 26 - Friday, Oct 24 Location: Visual Arts Building.

Opening Reception: Friday, September 26, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m.

The show is curated by Professor John Pomara and includes pieces from PhD candidate Jillian Round, LeeDon Moore, who is finishing his master of fine arts degree, and Arts and Technology (ATEC) master’s student Donald Davis.

“When I started my MFA I had no idea what I was doing,” said Moore, who is also creative director of UT Dallas’ Marketing Department. “I had been in advertising so long that I found it very difficult to not have a client or brand determine the end-results of my work. The first thing I had to do was relax and get comfortable with expressing my own point of view. It was much harder than I expected.”

Moore, who is showing both photography and sculpture, representing both digital and analog, said he had earned enough credits to graduate the semester before the Edith O’Donnell Arts and Technology Building opened, but was inspired by the new space to stay in the program an extra year.

“This incredible new space inspired me to start creating digital work again. I took my newfound confidence and point of view and began creating video ‘spectacles’ in PowerPoint. These pieces I am most proud of. They are truly representative of what I learned during my time in the program. These will be shown as a seven-minute video loop during the show,” Moore said.


Visual Art Building hours:
Monday - Friday . . . . . . . 9am to 10pm
Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9am to 6pm
Sunday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Closed

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Score http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220411321?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220411321?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS Thursday, Oct 23 - Saturday, Oct 25
(8 p.m. - 8 p.m.) Location: University Theatre.

One score (20 years) has passed since the first dance class was offered by the School of Arts and Humanities. Score will celebrate this landmark anniversary by presenting original choreography by faculty members Michele Hanlon, Misty Owens and Micki Saba for the UTDance Ensemble. Score will feature performances by alumni Jennifer Dennison, Paige Ghent and Ashley Merritt.

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Tiny Thumbs http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220414581?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220414581?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS Saturday, Oct 25
(8 p.m.) Location: CentralTrak.

Hosted by CentralTrak, Tiny Thumbs is an organization that builds awareness around the indie game scene. Queer.exe is a collection of games in the genre of Queerness. In this exhibition, there will be games that express aspects of queerness, either dealing with LGBT issues or broader notions of queerness within the video game medium. To this end we have a special showcase of Twine games. The Twine Pile, text based games, binds a community of game creators who thrive given the chance to tell their own stories in their own way. Also included are a selection of more traditional video games, in order to keep the bond between classical game development and more conceptual emerging indie games.

 

Bios

Bobby Frye is an independent artist and co-founder of tiny thumbs. Bobby specializes in independently produced games, the weirder the better, and enjoys showing them off to a broader audience. He is in charge of the Twine Pile, a series of text-based games.

 

Peter Wonica is a graduate student at the University of Texas at Dallas and independent game developer. His work is focused on how games and play can create spaces for critical conversations on sensitive social issues. He currently develops educational board games and runs workshops on learning through game design. 

 

ABOUT CENTRALTRAK

CentralTrak, The University of Texas at Dallas Artists Residency, established in 2008, is dedicated to the creation, presentation, and advancement of the contemporary arts.  As a live/work space for eight artists, it serves as a community center in the North Texas area for broad intellectual discourse around the arts.  While the residency promotes artistic experimentation through its support of production, the companion gallery encourages critical engagement in a local urban context through exhibitions and related programs. By building on the forward-thinking academic resources of the School of Arts & Humanities at The University of Texas at Dallas, CentralTrak unites artists from an expansive range of creative disciplines to extend and challenge contemporary notions of artistic practice, creative expression, and the role technology plays in these processes.

 

CentralTrak is supported in part by the generosity of numerous donors and partners from the North Texas area and The University of Texas at Dallas.

 

PUBLIC INFORMATION

CentralTrak

Address: 800 Exposition, Dallas, TX 75226

Hours: Saturday 12:00 – 5:00 during exhibitions, tours available by appointment call (469) 232-7298.

Admission: Free

 

Visit our Website at www.CentralTrak.com for more information

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Einspruch Lecture Series: Wendy Lower - Hitlers Furies: German Women in the Nazi Killing Fields http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220411951?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220411951?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS Sunday, Oct 26
(4 p.m.) Location: Alexander Clark Center.

Sunday: “Hitler’s Furies: German Women in the Nazi Killing Fields”

Monday: “Traitors to the Homeland: Nazi Collaborators and Soviet Trials in Ukraine.”

 

Wendy Lower is the author of Hitler’s Furies: German Women in the Nazi Killing Fields (2013). Hitler’s Furies challenges our deepest beliefs using evidence hidden for 70 years: women can be just as brutal as men. Drawing upon 20 years of archival research and fieldwork on the Holocaust, Lower’s stunning account of the role of German women on the Eastern Front—not only as plunderers and direct witnesses but as actual killers—powerfully revises history.

Lower is the John K. Roth Professor of History at Claremont McKenna College and a research associate at the Ludwig Maximilian University in Munich. A historical consultant for the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum, she has published numerous articles and books on the Holocaust, including Nazi Empire-Building and the Holocaust in Ukraine (2007).

For details, visit utdallas.edu/ackerman 

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Einspruch Lecture Series: Wendy Lower - Traitors to the Homeland: Nazi Collaborators and Soviet Trials in Ukraine. http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220411961?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220411961?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS Monday, Oct 27
(9:30 a.m.) Location: Alexander Clark Center.

Sunday: “Hitler’s Furies: German Women in the Nazi Killing Fields”
Monday: “Traitors to the Homeland: Nazi Collaborators and Soviet Trials in Ukraine.”

Wendy Lower is the author of Hitler’s Furies: German Women in the Nazi Killing Fields (2013). Hitler’s Furies challenges our deepest beliefs using evidence hidden for 70 years: women can be just as brutal as men. Drawing upon 20 years of archival research and fieldwork on the Holocaust, Lower’s stunning account of the role of German women on the Eastern Front—not only as plunderers and direct witnesses but as actual killers—powerfully revises history.

Lower is the John K. Roth Professor of History at Claremont McKenna College and a research associate at the Ludwig Maximilian University in Munich. A historical consultant for the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum, she has published numerous articles and books on the Holocaust, including Nazi Empire-Building and the Holocaust in Ukraine (2007).

For details, visit utdallas.edu/ackerman 

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ATEC Colloquium - Michael Naimark http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220414684?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220414684?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS Tuesday, Oct 28
(12 p.m. - 1 p.m.) Location: ATC 1.201.

Art & Invention

by

Michael Naimark

Abstract:  Artists and designers sometimes invent - new processes, media, or technologies - in the name of realizing their work. Invention isn't the primary motivation, and the works are often clunky, frugal, and just barely working (but working!). Broader, practical, or commercial applications are usually far from the artist's mind. Meanwhile, and perhaps ironically, large research and commercial institutions spend billions of dollars per year on invention, often in the same arenas. So the critical question is: how do artists fit in? We will explore this question - and such issues as control and compromise; ownership and intellectual property; time horizon and profitability; and cultural consequence and hegemony - mining my art projects and experiences for lessons learned.

Biography:  Michael Naimark is a media artist and researcher who's been blessed (and sometimes cursed) with an uncanny track record of art projects presaging widespread adoption, often by decades. He is noted in the histories of Google Street ViewProjection Mapping, and Virtual Reality (and, some claim, the Facebook Like Button); and in ongoing work with cinematic crowdsourcinglive global video, and cultural heritage. Michael's immersive and interactive art installations have exhibited internationally and are in the permanent collections of American Museum of the Moving Image, the Exploratorium, and the ZKM Center for Arts and Media. He was the recipient of the World Technology Award for the Arts in 2002 and was guest curator at Ars Electronica in 2004 and 2009. In recent years he's served as faculty at USC Cinema, NYU Art, and the MIT Media Lab.

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Behind Closed Doors http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220411271?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220411271?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS Friday, Oct 24 - Friday, Dec 12 Location: Edith O’Donnell Arts & Technology Building 1st floor Gallery .

Opening reception: October 24, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m.

A camera makes everyone a tourist in other people’s reality, and eventually in one’s own.

               Susan Sontag

Behind Closed Doors; Art made in secret; away from observers, reporters, or intruders, usually in a closed room. Done in private. Work that leaves the viewer feeling voyeuristic. Images that are emotionally difficult, off-putting, unresolved, or in a space that is entirely too personal, often painfully so. Off-limits.

Portraits that embody the characters psyche that can lead to extreme forms, but can also act as a sort of catharsis. Visual images that are seedy in extremities

In this exhibition the viewer is being giving a privileged view behind closed doors adding a voyeuristic feel to the images. It’s as if an eye can roam onto images made not to be seen. The work will focus on video, digital photography and sculptural installation. Artists such as Francis Bagley, Hillary Holsonback and Danielle Georgiou will be featured.

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Ruben Nieto: Paintings http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220414680?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS http://www.utdallas.edu/calendar/event.php?id=1220414680?WT.mc_id=CalendarRSS Friday, Oct 24 - Friday, Dec 12 Location: Edith O’Donnell Arts & Technology Building, first floor gallery.

Opening reception: October 24, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m.

 

Ruben Nieto’s exposure to comic books in his youth has left an indelible impression on him and, by proxy, on everyone who views his current paintings. His work has an impact greater than the sum of its fragmented, reconstituted parts, including the unorthodox process by which the paintings are made. Nieto digitally “shreds” and reassembles images taken from comic books, then sends the electronic files to academically trained artists at the Beijing Academy in China, who paint the images on canvas. The paintings are returned to the United States, where Nieto applies the finishing touches. If this sounds like a solution for art making particular to the climate of late post modernist irony in the early twenty-first century, it is worth noting that Baroque artists working in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries such as Peter Paul Rubens had legions of studio assistants painting major and minor figures and background details for their huge paintings of battle and hunting scenes. 

Nieto’s work is influenced by all the Pop Art antecedents one would expect, the most obvious being Roy Lichtenstein. But, in a way that could only be done by an individual looking at American popular culture from the vantage point of growing up in another country, Nieto places his fragmented comic book–derived imagery in compositions influenced by Abstract Expressionism. The result resembles comic book tableau homages to major mid-twentieth century artists like Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning, Robert Motherwell, and Clyfford Still. The titles of Neito’s work humorously reflect these influences, sometimes slyly referencing pictorial problems faced by members of the aforementioned group. By contrast, twentieth-century Italian artist and poet Domenico “Mimmo” Rotella is not usually mentioned in conjunction with Nieto’s work. But Rotella physically fragmented and collaged posters and the paper from billboards, resulting in images similar to Nieto’s work. By the time Pop Art was beginning to be embraced in the United States in the early- to mid-1960s, Rotella was already deconstructing similar imagery. 

Although Nieto’s paintings only hint at narrative, he refuses to eschew it entirely. As viewers attempt to find it, however, they realize that by simply prompting them to engage in this activity, the painting is already accomplishing what good paintings do. 

© Eugene Binder 2014 

 

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