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Callier Center for Communication Disorders

2017 Callier Prize Conference

Hearing Loss: Hidden Injury, Improved Diagnosis and Management

Friday, April 21, 2017 | 8:00 a.m. - 3:30 p.m. | Schedule
Callier Dallas, 1966 Inwood Road, Dallas, TX 75235, J108

Contact: Linda Sensibaugh at 214-905-3003

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Cost:
Student fee = $10
Practicum Supervisor and UTD Faculty/Staff fee = $20
Participant fee = $30

2017 Callier Prize Recipient: Dr. Sharon G. Kujawa

Dr. Sharon Kujawa is the director of audiology research and a senior scientist in the Eaton-Peabody Laboratories at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary in Boston.

The Callier Prize recognizes individuals from around the world for their leadership in fostering scientific advances and significant developments in the diagnosis and treatment of communication disorders. Past Recipients

Callier Prize Conference
Friday, April 21, 2017

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Continuing Education

Texas Speech-Language-Hearing Association: This program has been approved for 5 clock hours of continuing education credit by the Texas Speech-Language-Hearing Association (TSHA). TSHA approval does not imply endorsement of course content, specific products, or clinical procedures.

American Academy of Audiology: The UT Dallas Callier Center for Communication Disorders is approved by the American Academy of Audiology to offer Academy CEUs for this conference. The program is worth a maximum of .5 CEUs. Academy approval of this continuing education activity does not imply endorsement of course content, specific products or clinical procedures.

American Academy of Audiology

Conference Speakers

Sharon G. Kujawa, PhD
Director of Audiology Research, Eaton-Peabody Laboratories,
Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary
Associate Professor, Harvard Medical School
Callier Prize Recipient

Dr. Sharon Kujawa is an associate professor of otology and laryngology at Harvard Medical School. She is the director of audiology research and a senior scientist in the Eaton-Peabody Laboratories at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary in Boston. She serves on the faculty of the Program in Speech and Hearing Biosciences and Technology at Harvard University. Work in the Kujawa laboratory seeks to clarify mechanisms and manifestations of common forms of acquired sensorineural hearing loss in humans; particularly, those due to aging and exposure to noise and ototoxic drugs. Current work focuses on the primary loss of cochlear synapses and neurons that result, in characterizing the functional consequences of such loss, and in determining how the resulting degeneration can be manipulated pharmacologically to reveal mechanisms and suggest treatments.

 Sharon G. Kujawa, PhD
Sharon G. Kujawa, PhD

Presentation Title: Putting the Neural Back in Sensorineural: Primary Cochlear Neurodegeneration in Noise-Exposed and Aging Ears

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Rick Neitzel, PhD
Associate Professor, University of Michigan

Dr. Rick Neitzel is an associate professor in the exposure science program of the University of Michigan (UM) Department of Environmental Health Sciences, and also serves as Associate Chair of the department. He has a PhD in Environmental and Occupational Hygiene from the University of Washington, is a Certified Industrial Hygienist and a Fellow of the American Industrial Hygiene Association, and is vice chair of the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists Threshold Limit Value-Physical Agents Committee. He directs the Pilot Project Research Training grant program for the UM Center for Occupational Health and Safety Engineering, as well as the UM certificate program for Risk Science and Human Health. He has published more than 60 peer-reviewed manuscripts on topics related to exposure science, more than 40 of which focused on noise and hearing loss. His research interests include assessment of exposures to noise and injury risk factors in workplaces and community settings, and evaluation of auditory and non-auditory effects of noise and heavy metals.

Rick Neitzel, PhD
Rick Neitzel, PhD

Presentation Title: The Public Health Burden of Noise and Hearing Loss in America

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Judy R. Dubno, PhD
Professor and Director, Hearing Research Program
Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery
Medical University of South Carolina

Dr. Judy Dubno is a professor and director of the Hearing Research Program in the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery at the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston. Her research, which is supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health (NIH)/National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD), focuses on auditory perception and speech recognition in adverse listening conditions and how perception changes with age, hearing loss, hearing aids and training. She previously served on the advisory council of the NIH/NIDCD, four Institute of Medicine/National Academies of Science consensus committees, as president and secretary-treasurer of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology, and as president of the Acoustical Society of America. She is a fellow of the Acoustical Society of America and the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association and the recipient of the James Jerger Career Award for Research in Audiology.

 Judy R. Dubno, PhD
Judy R. Dubno, PhD

Presentation Title: Longitudinal Studies of Age-Related Hearing Loss: The Audiogram and Beyond

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Linda J. Hood, PhD
Professor and Associate Director for Research
National Center for Childhood Deafness and Family Communication
Vanderbilt University

Dr. Linda Hood is a professor and hearing scientist in the Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences and associate director for research at the National Center for Childhood Deafness and Family Communication. She is an honorary professor at the University of Queensland, Australia. Dr. Hood’s research, supported by the National Institutes of Health, focuses on auditory physiology, characterizing auditory function in pre-mature infants, auditory neuropathy/dys-synchrony, hereditary hearing loss, auditory function across the lifespan and efferent auditory function. In addition to research and teaching, Dr. Hood participates in review and working groups of the National Institutes of Health National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders and is a panelist for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. She is a past president of the American Academy of Audiology and the American Auditory Society and is the current past president of the International Society of Audiology.

Linda J. Hood, PhD
Linda Hood, PhD

Presentation Title: Neural Hearing Loss and the Audiogram: Evidence of a Mismatch in Pediatric Populations

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Schedule

8:00 a.m. Registration Begins
8:15 - 9:00 a.m. Continental Breakfast
9:00 - 9:10 a.m. Welcome and Opening Remarks: Dr. Thomas Campbell
9:10 - 10:00 a.m. Introduction and Panel Discussion: All four speakers with Dr. Edward Lobarinas moderating
10:00 - 11:00 a.m. Dr. Rick Neitzel | The Public Health Burden of Noise and Hearing Loss in America
11:00 - 11:15 a.m. Break
11:15 - 12:15 p.m.

Prize Presentation by Dr. Thomas Campbell

Dr. Sharon G. Kujawa | Putting the Neural Back in Sensorineural: Primary Cochlear Neurodegeneration in Noise-Exposed and Aging Ears

12:15 - 1:00 p.m. Lunch (provided)
1:00 - 2:00 p.m. Dr. Judy R. Dubno | Longitudinal Studies of Age-Related Hearing Loss: The Audiogram and Beyond
2:00 - 2:15 p.m. Break
2:15 - 3:15 p.m. Dr. Linda J. Hood | Neural Hearing Loss and the Audiogram: Evidence of a Mismatch in Pediatric Populations
3:15 - 3:30 p.m. Question and Answer Session

The Callier Prize Conference is part of the Bruton Conference Series. The series on communication disorders is made possible through a generous gift from the David J. Bruton Jr. Charitable Trust.