Dr. Orlando Auciello

Professor of materials science and engineering and bioengineering

Distinguished Chair in Engineering

Dr. Orlando Auciello earned his master’s and doctoral degrees in physics from the Balseiro Institute at the National University of Cuyo in Argentina.

Auciello has expertise in fusion energy, ferroelectric thin films found in non-volatile memories used in smart cards, and oxide films for supercapacitors.

He led the team that developed the ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) thin film technology when he was a senior scientist and later a distinguished fellow at Argonne National Laboratory from 1996 to 2012.

Industrial applications of UNCD coatings include mechanical water pump seals used in cars, coatings for bearings in machines that produce drugs for the pharmaceutical industry, and creating corrosion-resistant electrically conductive metals for electrodes in new-generation water purification systems. UNCD films are also used as a scaffold surface to grow stem cells.

Auciello has won numerous awards for developing UNCD technology, including the R&D 100 Award in 2003, 2008, 2009 and 2011. The Argus II device that Auciello was involved in developing uses UNCD technology and was recognized by Time magazine as one of the best inventions of 2013.

Another career highlight was a term served in 2013 as president of the Materials Research Society, the largest international organization of materials researchers from academia, industry and government.

Auciello is co-founder, investor and advisor of Advanced Diamond Technologies Inc., which commercializes UNCD-based industrial products, and Original Biomedical Implants, which will be housed in the University’s Venture Development Center.

“We need more scientists becoming entrepreneurs to help the U.S. economy,” Auciello said. “UT Dallas leaders have a vision for this activity, and the University is becoming a model of bringing science to the marketplace.”

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Dr. Orlando Auciello

Erik Jonsson School of Engineering
and Computer Science


Auciello led a team that patented a process to grow ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) thin films, which are revolutionizing the development of multifunctional devices. UNCD films are being used to coat microchips implantable in the eye to restore partial sight to the blind and to enable a new generation of longer-life dental implants and more.


“At UT Dallas there is great diversity of faculty and students from all over the world – Latin America, Europe, Asia. … This helps a new generation of scientists have a broad vision of what science and technology are, not just in the United States, but worldwide.”