Dr. Daniel C. Krawczyk

Associate professor of cognitive neuroscience and cognitive psychology

Debbie and Jim Francis Chair

Krawczyk’s research examines higher cognitive abilities and how people apply their past memories to make decisions about their current situations. His work spans multiple fields, including virtual reality gaming assessments, social cognition, human reasoning and how expertise affects thinking.

Krawczyk uses a variety of methods including functional neuroimaging to compare healthy individuals to people with neurological impairments and brain injuries in an attempt to improve diagnostic measures.

“My core motivation is to make discoveries about the mind and brain while trying to gain insights into disease. A large driving force in my career is to take what we learn from our research and find new ways to treat disease,” Krawczyk said.

Krawczyk received a bachelor’s degree in psychology from the State University of New York at Fredonia in 1998, followed by master’s and doctoral degrees from the University of California, Los Angeles, in the same field in 2000 and 2003, respectively.

After a postdoctoral research position at the University of California, Berkeley, he began a joint faculty position as an assistant professor at The University of Texas at Dallas and The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in 2006.

He was promoted to associate professor in 2012.

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Dr. Daniel C. Krawczyk

School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences


This chair was established in honor of Debbie and Jim Francis.


Although trained in cognition and computational modeling in his early career, Krawczyk has taken the rare step of crossing the research divide into clinical neuroscience. He has found acceptance among his peers for his work in brain imaging and examining how injury affects higher-order cognition.


“Since coming to Dallas, my work and career have grown a great deal through the collaborative efforts available at UT Dallas. The structure of BBS enables new opportunities in research and a coming together of a diverse group of minds over challenging neurological problems.”