Dr. Michael Rebello

Professor of Finance and Managerial Economics

Ashbel Smith Professor

Among Rebello's research interests are corporate governance, corporate capital structure, corporate restructuring, security analysts and venture capital financing.

"Recently, in the past five to seven years, there has been a big push to reform corporate governance," he said. "People have been trying to come up with policies, and it wasn't clear that the issues were fully understood. So the idea is to inform people about some of the issues that really matter and should be considered when making policy. With corporate restructuring, the idea was to explain why it occurs and the phenomena we observe."

His work has been published in such journals as American Economic Review, Journal of Accounting Research, Journal of Finance, Management Science and Review of Financial Studies.

Rebello said he is most proud of having his research cited in the Journal of Economic Literature’s retrospective of 25 years of research on the role of asymmetric information, which was published in 2001.

"It's a demonstration that my research has had some impact at least in terms of changing people's ideas and views on the subject," he said.

He arrived at UT Dallas in 2007. He previously taught at Georgia State University and Tulane University, where he received a teaching award in 2004. He also was a visiting scholar at the Stockholm Institute for Financial Research.

He served as a partner and advisor on hedge fund strategy and investment at Eiken Capital in Singapore from 2009 to 2011.

He earned his bachelor's degree in economics from St. Stephen's College at The University of Delhi in India. He earned his PhD in finance from The University of Texas at Austin.

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Dr. Michael Rebello

Naveen Jindal School of Management


The University of Texas System supports the professorship.


His research papers on corporate financing choices, corporate boards and auctions have been cited in influential surveys.


"The type of research I do is abstract: modeling corporate finance-related issues. And I think what it does is help people to recognize the forces at work that drive corporate decisions on things like compensation, the composition of boards of directors and corporate restructuring."