Dr. Kathryn E. Stecke

Professor of Operations Management

Ashbel Smith Professor

Stecke is an internationally recognized scholar in flexible manufacturing and supply chain issues. She speaks globally about issues related to supply chain management, operations and marketing interface issues, flexible manufacturing systems and seru, which is a Japanese organizational and production system that focuses on electronics product assembly.

Since she was a graduate student, Stecke has been an active member of the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences. She has chaired international and national meetings for the organization, which is known as INFORMS. She served two terms on the organization’s board of directors. In 2009, she was elected an INFORMS fellow.

In 2004, INFORMS selected her research paper, entitled "Formulation and Solution of Nonlinear Integer Production Planning Problems for Flexible Manufacturing Systems," as one of the 50 most influential papers published in Management Science in the last half century.

Stecke joined UT Dallas in 2002. Two years later, she received the Outstanding Graduate Teacher award in the Naveen Jindal School of Management. Before joining UT Dallas, she taught at the University of Michigan. She has served as an adjunct professor at the University of South Australia since 1999.

She has published numerous papers on various aspects of flexible manufacturing systems planning and scheduling in journals.

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Dr. Kathryn E. Stecke

Naveen Jindal School of Management


The University of Texas System supports the professorship


Stecke is the recipient of the Kimball Medal from the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS), which recognizes scholars for their distinguished service to the field of operations research and the management sciences. She is also an INFORMS fellow.


"Investiture is a very important honor. It is very nice thing the University is doing, recognizing the accomplishments of all of the chairs. UT Dallas places a very high value on faculty research, which is important to get closer to Tier One status."