Cochlear Implant Augmentation

  • Cochlear implant patient enjoys art class
  • Dr. Emily Tobey
  • Cochlear implant patient at summer camp

Project Overview

Young children who have reduced hearing often experience difficulty learning to communicate. These difficulties may be evident in their speech, language and reading abilities. One way teachers and clinicians help young children develop communication is to record a child’s speech and play it back to other listeners to determine how much they understand. As easy as this task may seem, it is a time-intensive endeavor and, therefore, often neglected in assessments.

The purpose of this project is to develop computer-assistive techniques designed to record, edit and play samples of speech produced by young children in order for adult listeners to report back how much of the speech sample they understand. Outcomes from the project assist clinicians in determining what sounds are produced correctly and incorrectly, what types of sentences are the easiest and hardest to produce, and what techniques might facilitate better speech in people with reduced hearing.

Stage of Development

This project is funded by the National Institute of Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. It is in the assessment and evaluation stage of development.

Development Team

The project is a collaboration among the UT Dallas School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences, the Callier Center for Communication Disorders, Washington University Medical School, the University of Miami, the University of Michigan, the University of North Carolina, the Johns Hopkins Medical Center and the House Research Institute. The investigators include:

Emily Tobey, PhD etobey@utdallas.edu
The University of Texas at Dallas, Communication Sciences and Disorders

Lisa Davidson, PhD
Central Institute of the Deaf in St. Louis

Johanna Nicholas, PhD
Child Language Laboratory at the Central Institute of the Deaf at Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis

Sishi Liu, MD, MS sxl083020@utdallas.edu
The University of Texas at Dallas, Communication Sciences and Disorders

Olga Peskova, MS olgapeskova@utdallas.edu
The University of Texas at Dallas, Communication Sciences and Disorders

Sujin Shin, MS sxs087000@utdallas.edu
The University of Texas at Dallas, Communication Sciences and Disorders