Cochlear Implant Personal Digital Assistant

  • Engineering researchers are developing technology that will improve smartphone interface with cochlear implants
  • Cochlear implant patient at summer camp
  • Research team working on personal digital assistant interaction with cochlear implants

Project Overview

It seems like such an easy task—listening, just listening. But listening is a phenomenon that millions of Americans are unable to experience because they are deaf. An even greater number of Americans face difficulties when listening in noisy backgrounds or when the signal they wish to hear is too soft.

The purpose of the ciPDA (cochlear implant personal digital assistant) project is to develop a sophisticated tool that allows hearing engineers to design solutions addressing the problems that some individuals experience when trying to listen. This will be particularly helpful to people who are deaf and use cochlear implants to restore aspects of their hearing. The goal is to develop a hardware and software module that can be used to make it easier to understand speech when the background is noisy or the speech is soft.

Stage of Development

The ciPDA project is funded by the National Institute of Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. Portions of the work have been granted investigational status by the Food and Drug Administration. It is in the assessment and evaluation stage of development.

Development Team

The ciPDA project is a collaboration among the UT Dallas School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences, the Callier Center for Communication Disorders, the Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and Computer Science, the University of Arizona and the University of Wisconsin. The team of researchers includes:

Philipos Loizou, PhD
The University Of Texas at Dallas, Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and Computer Science

Emily Tobey, PhD [email protected]
The University of Texas at Dallas, Communication Sciences and Disorders

John Hansen, PhD [email protected]
The University Of Texas at Dallas, Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and Computer Science

Hussnain Ali, MS [email protected]
The University Of Texas at Dallas, Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and Computer Science

Oldooz Hazrati, PhD [email protected]
The University Of Texas at Dallas, Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and Computer Science

Feng Hong, PhD [email protected]
The University Of Texas at Dallas, Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and Computer Science

Jaewook Lee, MS
The University Of Texas at Dallas, Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and Computer Science

Nirmal Srinivasan, PhD [email protected]
The University of Texas at Dallas, Communication Sciences and Disorders

Dongmei Wang, MS [email protected]
The University Of Texas at Dallas, Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and Computer Science

Hua Xing, PhD [email protected]
The University Of Texas at Dallas, Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and Computer Science

Chengzhu Yu, PhD [email protected]
The University Of Texas at Dallas, Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and Computer Science