GEOSCIENCES COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

GENERAL COURSES

GEOS 5300 GEOHYDROLOGY
(3 semester hours) Theory and application of groundwater presence and movement with emphasis on environmental concerns. (3-0)
GEOS 5400 EARTH SCIENCE
(4 semester hours) A review of Earth processes as a whole: time and geology; igneous and sedimentary processes and products; metamorphism; structure; evolution of continents and oceans. This course is open only to those students whose major undergraduate study was in subjects other than geology. This course cannot be used to satisfy degree requirements for geosciences majors. Laboratory and field trip course. (3-3)
GEOS 5301 MARINE GEOLOGY
(3 semester hours) Study of such concepts as plate tectonics and the vast amount of information gathered by programs such as the Deep Sea Drilling Project, which have made marine geology a sophisticated multi-disciplinary science. Topics to be covered will include plate tectonics and sea-floor spreading, petrology of the oceanic crust, margin types and evolution, oceanic circulation, global geochemical cycles, deep-sea sedimentation, sea-level history, paleoceanography, and global paleoceanographic evolution. (3-0)
GEOS 5401 ELEMENTS OF EARTH'S HISTORY
(4 semester hours) Overview of historical geology and its relationship to sedimentation, structural geology, stratigraphy, and plate tectonics. Laboratory includes sedimentary rocks, paleontology, structural, and stratigraphic problems. This course cannot be used to satisfy degree requirements for geosciences majors. Laboratory and field trip course. Prerequisite: GEOS 5400 or consent of instructor. (3-3)
GEOS 5302 PETROLEUM GEOLOGY
(3 semester hours) Application of geological, geochemical and geophysical principles to petroleum exploration. Topics include depositional environments of reservoir rocks, recognition of source beds, subsurface structure, reservoir engineering, geophysical exploration, and prospect economics. A five-week exploration game will be played. May be used to satisfy degree requirements for geosciences majors. Prerequisites: sedimentology, stratigraphy and structural geology. (3-0)
GEOS 5303 COMPUTING FOR GEOSCIENTISTS
(3 semester hours) Application of computer techniques in solving geological problems. Includes instruction in the FORTRAN language, plotting facilities, introductory matrix theory, and statistics. Students will examine problems in basic statistical analysis, graphics, and mapping of geological and geophysical data. Development of programming skills in areas directly related to theses and dissertation research is encouraged. Serves as introduction to UNIX and the U.T. Dallas computing facility. Laboratory sessions are included. (2-3)
GEOS 5304 GEOSCIENCES FIELD TRIP
(3 semester hours) A study of the geology of a selected region within the United States and/or northern Mexico followed by a field trip to the selected region in order to study the field relationships of geologic features within that region. This course can only be used to partially satisfy the field experience requirement and breadth requirement for geosciences majors. Field trip course. (May be repeated for credit.) (1-6)
GEOS 5305 REMOTE SENSING
(3 semester hours) Application of airborne and space-borne sensors for the resolution of geological problems. Focus on interpretation of passive and active imaging systems based on electromagnetic radiation, especially visible, infra-red, and radar.(3-0)
GEOS 5306 DATA ANALYSIS FOR GEOSCIENTISTS
(3 semester hours) Advanced statistical techniques with important applications in Earth science, beyond the level of GEOS 5303. Topics include robust statistics, exploratory data analysis, surface modeling and contouring, Kriging, factor analysis of mixtures, cluster analysis, and time series analysis. Emphasis will be on application and theoretical understanding. Prerequisite: GEOS 5303 or equivalent. (3-0)
GEOS 5406 REGIONAL GEOLOGY
(4 semester hours) A multidisciplinary course examining the geological development of a region of the Earth. Emphasis will commonly be on North America. Field trip course. (2-6)
GEOS 5307 WELL LOG INTERPRETATION
(3 semester hours) The principles and operational limitations of spontaneous potential (SP), normal (16'' and 64''), lateral microcaliper, resistivity, induction, gamma-ray, neutron, density, sonic, dipmeter, and temperature logs will be discussed. Geologic examples will be used to explain the application of these logging tools. The effects of porosity, permeability, mineral, and fluid content to log response in various types of reservoirs will be developed. (3-0)
GEOS 5108-5408 SPECIAL TOPICSIN GEOLOGY OR GEOPHYSICS
(1-4 semester hours) Courses dealing with a variety of topics including igneous petrology, new techniques in geophysics, and specific tectonic problems among others. Hours vary depending on course requirements. ([1-3]-[0-3])
GEOS 5409 M.A.T. FIELD TRIP
(4 semester hours) Designed for students in the M.A.T. program to gain relevant field geological experience. (May be repeated for credit.) (1-9)
GEOS 5410 INSTRUMENTALTECHNIQUES IN GEOSCIENCES
(4 semester hours) Modern instrumental techniques including atomic absorption spectrophotometry, scanning electronmicroscopy, x-ray diffraction, sample preparation, and darkroom techniques. Laboratory course. (2-6)
GEOS 6411 ELECTRON MICROPROBE TECHNIQUES
(4 semester hours) Principles and procedures in scanning electron spectrophotometry including energy dispersive analysis. Laboratory course. (2-6)
GEOS 6215 GEOSCIENCE PRESENTATIONS
(2 semester hours) Designed to provide students with some experience in giving oral and written presentations based on literature review or research interests and on critiquing oral presentations. Required of all Geosciences graduate students.(2-0)
GEOS 7100-7300 RESEARCH AND LITERATURE SEMINAR
(1-3 semester hours) Presentations and critical analysis of independent work and of the recent literature. (May be repeated for credit.) ([1-3]-0)
GEOS 5309 SPECIAL TOPICS/TAGER
(3 semester hours) (3-0)

STRATIGRAPHY COURSES

GEOS 5421 PRINCIPLESOF STRATIGRAPHY
(4 semester hours) Principles and evolution of modern stratigraphic nomenclature. Analysis of the International Stratigraphic Guide (1976) and North American Stratigraphic Code (1983). Examination of stratigraphic successions in different tectostratigraphic domains (settings). Laboratory and field trip course. Field exercises. (3-3)
GEOS 6322 TECTONOSTRATIGRAPHY
(3 semester hours) A course designed to introduce students to terrane analysis, including paleogeographic domains and petrotectonic assemblages. Special attention will be given to the evolution of North American tectonostratigraphic terranes during the Mesozoic. Essays and oral presentations. (3-0)
GEOS 8120-8920 RESEARCH IN STRATIGRAPHY
(1-9 semester hours) May be repeated for credit. ([1-9]-0)

PALEONTOLOGY COURSES

GEOS 5430 FOSSILS
(4 semester hours) Collection and identification of fossils common to the Gulf Coast Plain Province of Texas and to adjoining provinces. Laboratory and field trip course. This course cannot be used to satisfy degree requirements for geosciences majors. (2-6)
GEOS 5331 PRINCIPLES AND METHODS OF PALEONTOLOGY
(3 semester hours) Analysis of the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature. Problems in systematic paleontology. Preparation of paleontological descriptions and diagnoses. Evolutionary theory. (3-0)
GEOS 5432 MICROPALEONTOLOGY
(4 semester hours) The study of invertebrate microfossils with emphasis on the Foraminifera and Radiolaria. Laboratory course. Prerequisite: historical geology.(2-6)
GEOS 6432 MESOZOIC PLANKTONIC FORAMINIFERA
(4 semester hours) Morphology, phylogeny, and classification of Mesozoic planktonic Foraminifera. Special studies dealing with the Foraminifera in Texas. Laboratory and field trip course. Prerequisite: GEOS 5432. (2-6)
GEOS 6433 MESOZOIC RADIOLARIA
(4 semester hours) Morphology, phylogeny, class formation, stratigraphic distribution, and paleobiogeography of Mesozoic Radiolaria. Laboratory course. (2-6)
GEOS 6435 TECHNIQUES ANDMETHODS IN MICROPALEONTOLOGY
(4 semester hours) Techniques used in sample processing, scanning electron microscopy, photography of microfossils, and the preparation of scientific reports. Students will be expected to carry a microfossil-bearing sample(s) from the processing state to the preparation of a formal scientific report. Laboratory course. Prerequisite: GEOS 5432 or permission of instructor. (3-3)
GEOS 7230 WORKSHOP IN PALEONTOLOGY
(2 semester hours) Presentation and discussion of current research and analysis of current literature. (May be repeated for credit.) (2-0)
GEOS 8130-8930 RESEARCH IN PALEONTOLOGY
(1-9 semester hours) May be repeated for credit. ([1-9]-0)

SEDIMENTOLOGY COURSES

GEOS 5342 SILICICLASTIC SEDIMENTARY ENVIRONMENTS
(3 semester hours) Interpretation of ancient clastic sedimentary environments of deposition in the light of the Recent based on studies of lithologies, primary sedimentary structure, vertical sequences, unit geometry, electric logs, and trace fossils. Stratigraphic architecture resulting from autocyclic and allocyclic mechanisms are investigated. One week field trip. Prerequisite: undergraduate course in stratigraphy and sedimentology. (3-0)
GEOS 5443 CARBONATESEDIMENTARY ENVIRONMENTS
(4 semester hours) Description and classification of carbonate sediments and carbonate rocks. Aspects of carbonate geochemistry will be covered. The course will emphasize recent carbonate depositional environments and facies models for use as analogs for interpreting ancient sequences. Laboratory will stress identification and classification of carbonate sediments and rocks in hand sample and thin-section. Laboratory and field trip course. Prerequisite: GEOS 3440. (3-3)
GEOS 5444 TERRIGENOUS SEDIMENTARY PETROLOGY
(4 semester hours) Description, classification and genesis of clastic terrigenous sedimentary rocks in thin-section and hand sample. Emphasis is on sandstones, but coverage of conglomerates, siltstones and shales is also included. Diagenetic processes, timing and products will be examined. Major application devoted to porosity and permeability modification in sediments. Laboratory course. Prerequisites: sedimnetology and optical mineralogy. (2-6)
GEOS 5445 CARBONATE DIAGENESIS
(4 semester hours) Integration of field, petrographic and geochemical data to assess the post-depositional changes occurring in carbonate sediments and rocks. Topics covered will include: an introduction to carbonate chemistry, marine cementation, groundwater chemistry, meteoric vadose and phreatic systems, water-rock interaction, dolomitization, and burial diagenesis. The course will emphasize the application of isotopic and minor element chemistry to the study of diagenetic systems. Laboratories will involve examination of thin sections and hand samples. Laboratory and field trip course. Prerequisite: GEOS 5443. (2-6)
GEOS 5348 SEA LEVEL AND SEDIMENTATION
(3 semester hours) Concepts of sea level cyclicity and its relationship to the development of sedimentary sequences. Driving mechanisms for allo- and autocyclic sea level fluctuations will be explored. Various geologic techniques for recognition of sedimentary response to local and global eustasy will be presented. Topics include Milankovitch cyclicity, seismic and sequence stratigraphy, basin subsidence mechanisms, and global sea level dynamics throughout geologic history. (3-0)
GEOS 8140-8940 RESEARCH IN SEDIMENTOLOGY
(1-9 semester hours) (May be repeated for credit.) ([1-9]-0)

GEOCHEMISTRY COURSES

GEOS 5351 ORGANIC GEOCHEMISTRY
(3 semester hours) Composition and distribution of organic matter in sediments, generation of hydrocarbons, source rock characterization, kerogen maturation, application of hydrocarbon geochemistry to exploration. Prerequisite: one year of chemistry, sedimentology or equivalent. (3-0)
GEOS 5352 GEOCHEMISTRYOF IGNEOUS ROCKS
(3 semester hours) Chemical composition of igneous rocks and the major processes that control the distribution of the elements in silicate melts. Topics to be covered include the structure of silicate melts, trace elements partitioning between crystals and melts, and the use of major and trace elements in deciphering the formation and evolution of silicate melts. (3-0)
GEOS 5353 SEDIMENTARYGEOCHEMISTRY
(3 semester hours) Geochemical aspects of the sedimentary environment including weathering, chemistry of natural waters, calcium carbonate geochemistry, mineral-organic matter interaction, early diagenesis, and C, O and S iostopes. Prerequisite: one year of chemistry, sedimentology or equivalent. (3-0)
GEOS 5354 STABLE ISOTOPE GEOCHEMISTRY
(3 semester hours) Theory and application of light stable isotopes (H, C, O, N, S) to geologic problem solving. Topics covered will include: introduction to mass spectrometry, isotopic fractionation, paleothermometry, isotopic compositions of natural waters, plants and animals. Application of stable isotopes to studies of diagenesis and water-rock interaction, groundwater management, paleoceanography and secular variations in the isotopic composition. Prerequisites: one year of chemistry or permission of instructor. (3-0)
GEOS 5355 INTRODUCTORY GEOCHRONOLOGY
(3 semester hours) Radiometric age dating as applied to the solution of geologic problems. (3-0)
GEOS 5356 ISOTOPE GEOCHEMISTRY FOR PETROLOGISTS
(3 semester hours) Synthesis of the elements in stars and chronologies for the galaxy. Isotope systematics in meteorites, abundance anomalies, cosmogenic nuclides, and solar system chronologies. The development of the modern multi-collector mass spectrometer. Mass fractionation laws, double spiking techniques, and high percision isotope ratio measurements. Isotope geochemistry of noble gases and radiogenic nuclides as pertaining to the composition and history of the mantle and crust. High-temperature and, where applicable, low-temperature water-rock interactions pertaining to the origin of igneous rocks. The evolution of radiogenic Sr in sea water. (3-0)
GEOS 5357 TOXIC METALS IN THE ENVIRONMENT
(3 semester hours) Sources, environmental pathways, human uptake, metabolism, and toxic effects of the principal metallic pollutants. Past, present and future problems. Regulation and setting of environmental standards. (3-0)
GEOS 6351 GEOCHEMICAL CYCLES AND OCEAN CHEMISTRY
(3 semester hours) Global cycling of oxygen, carbon, sulfur, strontium, magnesium. Secular variations in the O, C, S and Sr isotopic composition of seawater during geologic time. The role of carbon dioxide in the interaction of atmosphere, lithosphere and hydrosphere will be discussed. The course will emphasize the inter-relation of each tracer system, isotopic-mass balance approaches, and all fluxes into and out of the oceans including: seawater-basalt interaction, continental weathering, carbonate precipitation and organic carbon burial. Processes such as glaciation, sea level fluctations and plate tectonics will be examined. Prerequisites: A background in isotope geochemistry or permission of instructor. (3-0)
GEOS 6455 GEOCHEMICAL EXPLORATION
(4 semester hours) Origin, movement, and fate of elements in the natural environments. Geochemical methods in mineral and petroleum exploration including analytical techniques and studies of weathering, soil formation, primary and secondary dispersion patterns and anomalies. Laboratory and field trip course. (3-3)
GEOS 8150-8950 RESEARCH IN GEOCHEMISTRY
(1-9 semester hours) (May be repeated for credit.) ([1-9]-0)

MINERAL RESOURCES-PETROLOGY COURSES

GEOS 5360 PHASE EQUILIBRIA
(3 semester hours) Principles of phase equilibria and their application to problems of igneous and metamorphic petrology. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (3-0)
GEOS 5462 ROCKS AND MINERALS
(4 semester hours) Crystallography; identification of common rocks and minerals; origins and occurrences of rocks and minerals. Laboratory course. This course cannot be used to satisfy degree requirements for geosciences majors. (2-6)
GEOS 5464 MINERAL RESOURCES
(4 semester hours) Principles and relationships of economics and politics to the utilization of mineral and industrial deposits; ore mineralogy; classification of commercial earth materials; geochemical cycle of various elements; geology, distribution, characteristics, formation, enrichment and localization of various economic mineral and industrial deposits. Relationship of mineral and industrial deposits to global tectonics. Laboratory and field trip course. (3-3)
GEOS 5465 ORE PETROLOGY
(4 semester hours) Essentials of reflected light microscopy; mineralogy, textural relationships, paragenesis, phase chemistry, and origin of major ore minerals; detailed study of selected ore bodies. Laboratory course. Prerequisite: GEOS 5464 or consent of instructor. (2-6)
GEOS 6462 HYDROTHERMALORE DEPOSITS
(4 semester hours) Physical, chemical, and isotopic characteristics of hydrothermal ore deposits and enclosing rocks; propertiesof ore-forming solutions; solubilitiesof ore and non-ore minerals; characteristics of geothermal systems; mass transfer; isotopes; and thermal aspects of ore deposition. Laboratory and field trip course. Prerequisite: GEOS 5465 or consent of instructor. (3-3)
GEOS 8160-8960 RESEARCH IN PETROLOGY
(1-9 semester hours) (May be repeated for credit.) ([1-9]-0)

STRUCTURAL GEOLOGY-TECTONICS COURSES

GEOS 5470 STRUCTURAL GEOLOGY
(4 semester hours) Examination of stress and strain, failure criteria, fault analysis, rheologic properties of geologic materials, fold analysis, and a survey of major structural provinces in North America, with supplemental readings. Laboratory includes map interpretation, standard graphical techniques, and use of stereographic projections, oral presentations, and problem sets. Laboratory and field trip course. Prerequisite: PHYS 1301 or equivalent. (3-3)
GEOS 5375 TECTONICS
(3 semester hours) Study of the Earth's present tectonic environments, including geochemistry, sedimentology, and structure; application of present tectonic environments towards the reconstruction of ancient crustal events; consideration of temporal aspects of crustal evolution. Oral and written presentations required. Prerequisite: structural geology. (3-0)
GEOS 5476 ANALYSISOF GEOLOGIC STRUCTURES
(4 semester hours) Study of strain analysis and the origin of tectonic fabrics, including use of stereonet and petrographic microscope to outline deformational and metamorphic history. Laboratory and field trip course. Prerequisite: structural geology, petrology, with sedimentology and linear algebra recommended. (3-3)
GEOS 5477 DEFORMATIONAL MECHANISMS
(4 semester hours) Tensor mathematics as applied to stress and strain. Examination of elastic response, failure criteria, ductile deformation mechanisms, and recrystallization theory with an introduction to experimental rock deformation and microstructural analysis using the universal stage and transmission electron microscope. Laboratory course. Prerequisites: structural geology, petrology. Calculus with linear algebra recommended. (3-3)
GEOS 7270 WORKSHOP IN STRUCTURE/TECTONICS
(2 semester hours) Presentation and discussion of current research with emphasis on problems, techniques, and recent literature. (May be repeated for credit.) (2-0)
GEOS 8170-8970 RESEARCH IN STRUCTURAL GEOLOGYTECTONICS
(1-9 semester hours) May be repeated for credit. ([1-9]-0)

GENERAL GEOPHYSICS COURSES

GEOS 5481 DIGITAL GEOPHYSICALSIGNAL PROCESSING
(4 semester hours) Temporal and spatial transform analysis of geophysical signals including use of spectra, band-pass filtering, velocity filtering, and deconvolution filter design. Laboratory course. (3-3)
GEOS 5482 GPS (GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM) SATELLITE SURVEYING
TECHNIQUES (4 semester hours) The theory and application of satellite positioning utilizing the Global Positioning System Code and phase methodology in field observations, data processing and analysis of Differential GPS, high accuracy static and other rapid measurements, in real time and with post-processing. (3-3)
GEOS 5483 GEOPHYSICAL TECHNIQUES I
(4 semester hours) Part one of a two part course on the theoretical basis and practical aspects of geophysical data collection, processing and interpretation. The planning and execution of small scale surveys, of the type employed in engineering, groundwater and environmental site evaluations, is featured. Techniques include conventional and satellite (Global Positioning System) positioning and the potential field geophysical methods, including gravity, magnetic, and electric (resistivity and electromagnetic). The integrated interpretation of different data types is emphasized. A background in calculus and general physics is required. (3-3)
GEOS 5484 GEOPHYSICAL TECHNIQUES II
(4 semester hours) Part two of a two part course on the theoretical and practical aspects of geophysical data collection. The planning and execution of small scale surveys, of the type employed in engineering, groundwater and environmental site evaluations, is featured. Techniques coveredinclude both refraction and reflection seismology and both low and high frequency, single and multi-channel ground-penetrating radar. Advantage is taken of both the similarities and complimentary behaviors of seismic and radar waves. An integration,of both seismic and radar data, as well as data from the methods covered in Geophysical Techniques I, is emphasized in interpretation. A background in calculusand general physics is required. Prerequisite: GEOS 5483 Geophysical Techniques I or permission of instructor. (3-3)
GEOS 5389 EXPLORATION GRAVITY
(3 semester hours) The gravity method is studied in detail with regard to its application to exploration for hydrocarbons, minerals, geothermal sources, groundwater, and geotechnical studies, including surveying, processing, analysis, and modeling of gravity data. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.(3-0)
GEOS 6382 GEOPHYSICALINVERSION THEORY
(3 semester hours) Theoretical and practical aspects of fitting mathematical models to data in geophysics. Topics covered include the inversion of both discrete models and integral equations, solution of systems of non-linear equations and the use of both least squares and least absolute value measures. Particular attention is paid to assessment of model accuracy and uniqueness. Prerequisites: GEOS 5481 and advanced calculus. Permission of instructor required. (3-0)
GEOS 8180-8980 RESEARCHIN GEOPHYSICS
(1-9 semester hours) May be repeated for credit. ([1-9]-0)

SEISMOLOGY COURSES

GEOS 5390 SEISMOLOGY
(3 semester hours) Analysis of stress and strain; the wave equation; plane wave reflection and refraction; spherical waves and head waves; surface waves; ray theory; travel time observations; seismicity; tomography. (3-0)
GEOS 5391 EXPLORATION SEISMOLOGY
(3 semester hours) Data processing for seismic exploration. Deconvolution, velocity analysis, statics, migration, filtering, slant-stack, 3-D exploration, V.S.P.'s, and tomography. (3-0)
GEOS 6391 EARTHQUAKE SEISMOLOGY
(3 semester hours) Near and far field representations of earthquake sources, engineering (strong motion) seismology, characteristics and interpretation of earthquake phases, use of earthquakes in determining Earth structure, risk and prediction, instrumentation. Includes a case study of a recent large earthquake. Prerequisite: GEOS 5390. (3-0)
GEOS 6392 REFLECTION SEISMOLOGY
(3 semester hours) Theoretical and practical aspects of seismic reflection data acquisition and processing. Includes the wave equation, the convolutional model, coded sources, the array response, velocity estimation, statics, filtering, pre- and post-stack migration, and direct and indirect detection of hydrocarbons, VSPs and 3-D processing. Prerequisites: GEOS 5481, and GEOS 5390 or equivalent. (3-0)
GEOS 6393 COMPUTATIONALSEISMOLOGY
(3 semester hours) Principles of vector computing with applications to seismology. Includes overviews of Convex and Cray architectures, writing and debugging vectorized code, characterization of machine performance, fast Fourier transforms, Radon transforms, solution of matrix equations. Laboratory course. Prerequisites: GEOS 5303, GEOS 5481, and any numerical analysis course. (2-3)
GEOS 6395 SEISMIC MODELING
(3 semester hours) Theory and application of the major techniques for computation of synthetic seismograms. Topics include asymptotic ray theory, spectral and slowness methods, finite differences, finite elements, Kirchhoff, and boundary integral methods. Readings will be drawn from the literature. Prerequisite: GEOS 5390 and any two graduate seismology courses.(3-0)
GEOS 6396 SEISMIC INVERSION
(3 semester hours) Theory and application of the major techniques for inversion of seismic data. Topics include linear and nonlinear matrix methods, Wiechert-Herglotz integration, extremal inversion, migration, wavefield imaging of body and surface waves, and tomography, imaging of VSPs, and Born inversion. Readings will be drawn from the literature. Prerequisite: Any two graduate seismology courses. (3-0)
GEOS 7190 WORKSHOPIN SEISMOLOGY
(1 semester hour) Informal presentation and discussion of current research of graduate students and faculty, of new computing equipment and software, and of current research literature. (1-0)
GEOS 8190-8990 RESEARCHIN SEISMOLOGY
(1-9 semester hours) May be repeated for credit. ([1-9]-0)

THESIS AND DISSERTATION COURSES

GEOS 8398 THESIS
(3 semester hours) May be repeated for credit. (3-0)
GEOS 8399 DISSERTATION
(3 semester hours) May be repeated for credit. (3-0)
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