Course Descriptions

Many of the course descriptions in the School of Arts and Humanities are generic in nature. They define an area of inquiry and/or creative activity within the boundaries of which instructors offer courses on specific topics. Each semester the school makes available detailed descriptions of the specific courses to be offered during the next term. Moreover, the specific topics to be covered in generic courses will be listed with the course titles in the class schedules published by the university.

Arts and Technology Core Courses

ATEC 5349 Interdisciplinary Approaches to the Arts and Technology (3 semester hours) Introduction to the interdisciplinary study of mutual interactions between technology and the creative arts. Establishes basic theoretical concepts and principles underlying the graduate program in Arts and Technology. Required of all degree candidates in Arts and Technology. (3-0) Y
ATEC 6331 Aesthetics of Interactive Arts (3 semester hours) Exploration of aesthetic principles underlying the interactive electronic arts, their relation to and divergence from aesthetic principles underlying traditional forms of artistic expression. Topics will include interactive games, animation, and new modes of narrative.
Required of all degree candidates in Arts and Technology. (0-3) Y

Arts and Technology Elective Courses

ATEC 6341 Game Design (3 semester hours) Exploration and application of advanced methods and techniques (literary, artistic, conceptual, technical) involved in the development of interactive computer-based games. Includes participation in development team for creation of a complex computer game. (May be repeated to a maximum of 6 credit hours.) (0-3) Y
ATEC 6351 Digital Arts (3 semester hours) Exploration and application of advanced methods and techniques for the creation of visual images through the use of digital media.
Topics may vary. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 credit hours. (0-3) Y
ATEC 6361 Writing for Interactive Media (3 semester hours) Theory, principles and practice of narratives created for distribution via digital media.
Will include creation of both linear and nonlinear digital content for electronic distribution. (May be repeated to a maximum of 6 credit hours.) (0-3) Y
ATEC 6371 Community Media (3 semester hours) Students develop local media that gives voice to people and issues in a particular community.
Emphasis on personal, expressive media production that displays an authentic, personal voice. Students write and produce projects for Internet distribution using text, audio, video, interactive, and participatory elements. (0-3) T
ATEC 6372 Approaches to Emergent Media and Communications (3 semester hours)
Focuses on the study of emergent media from a theoretical frame, exploring the political, technological, cultural and historical forces which inform the way media and communication develop. (3-0) T
ATEC 6373 Emerging Media Studio (3 semester hours)
This course explores media production across multiple media. Students work in teams to develop meta-media projects in a variety of content delivery environments. Class will require students to develop a range of rhetorical (text, audio) and visual (image, video) strategies appropriate for emerging media. (May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 hours) (3-0) T
ATEC 7301 Digital
Textuality (3 semester hours) This course will focus on understanding how representation and specifically writing has historically changed, paying special attention to the transformation from the analog to the digital. (May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 6 hours) (3-0) T
ATEC 6V81 Special Topics in Emergent Communication (1-9 semester hours) Explores current theories informing research on and practices in digital media and communication, such as distributed, mobile, time-shifted, interactive and personal media.
(May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 credit hours as topics vary.) (0-[1-9]) T
ATEC 7V81 Advanced Project Workshop (3-6 semester hours) Students will engage in the creation of an advanced creative and/or research project exploring the interaction of the arts with digital technology.
Required of all degree candidates in Arts and Technology. ([3-6]-0) Y
ATEC 7V82 Advanced Projects in Interactive Media (1-9 semester hours) Students will complete an advanced creative and/or research project exploring the interaction of communication and digital technology.
(May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 credit hours as topics vary.) (0-[1-9]) T
ATEC 7390 Special Topics in Arts and Technology (3 semester hours) If taken as an independent studies course may count toward minimum course requirements for the M.A. or M.F.A. degree.
(May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 credit hours.) (3-0) R
ATEC 8303 Independent Readings in Arts and Technology (3 semester hours) (May be repeated for credit) (3-0) R
ATEC 8305 Independent Research in Arts and Technology (3 semester hours) (May be repeated for credit.) (3-0) R

Emerging Media and Communication Core Course

EMAC 5300 Introduction to the Study of Emerging Media and Communication (3 semester hours) Introduction to interdisciplinary study of the implications of interactive technology for the creation, dissemination and impact of communication. Establishes basic theoretical concepts and principles underlying the graduate program in Emerging Media and Communication. (3-0)Y

 Emerging Media and Communication Elective Courses

EMAC 6361 (ATEC 6341) Writing for Interactive Media (3 semester hours) Theory, principles, and practice of narratives created for distribution via digital media. Will include creation of both linear and nonlinear digital content for electronic distribution. (0-3) Y
EMAC 6371 (ATEC 6371) Community Media (3 semester hours) Students develop local media that gives voice to people and issues in a particular community.
Emphasis on personal, expressive media production that displays an authentic, personal voice. Students write and produce projects for Internet distribution using text, audio, video, interactive, and participatory elements. (0-3) T
EMAC 6372 (ATEC 6372) Approaches to Emergent Media and Communication (3 semester hours)
Focuses on the study of emergent media from a theoretical frame, exploring the political, technological, cultural, and historical forces which inform the way media and communication develop. (May be repeated for credit as topics vary to a maximum of 9 credit hours.) (3-0) T
EMAC 6373 (ATEC 6373) Emerging Media Studio I (3 semester hours) Explores media production across multiple media.
Students work in teams to develop meta-media projects in a variety of content delivery environments. Class will require students to develop a range of rhetorical (text, audio) and visual (image, video) strategies appropriate for emerging media. (May be repeated for credit as topics vary to a maximum of 9 hours) (0-3) T
EMAC 6383 Emerging Media Studio II
(3 semester hours) Advanced collaborative workshop devoted to the creation of sophisticated communications employing multiple media platforms. (0-3) T

EMAC 7301 (ATEC 7301) Digital Textuality (3 semester hours) This course will focus on understanding how representation and specifically writing has historically changed, paying special attention to the transformation from the analog to the digital. (May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 6 hours) (3-0) T
EMAC 6V81 Special Topics in Emergent Communication (1-9 semester hours) Explores current theories informing research on and practices in digital media and communication, such as distributed, mobile, time-shifted, interactive and personal media.
(May be repeated for credit as topics vary to a maximum of 9 credit hours.) (0-[1-9]) T
EMAC 7V81 Advanced Project Workshop (3-6 semester hours) Students will engage in the creation of an advanced creative and/or research multi-media project.
Required of all degree candidates in Emerging Media and Communication. ([3-6]-0) Y

History Core Course

HIST 5311 Historiography (3 semester hours) Graduate-level introduction to the practice and forms of written history. Required of all students in the M.A. program in History, this course examines the ways in which historians have conceived of their craft, the centrality of interpretation to the historical process, and the use of a variety of methods and theories in the study of the past. (3-0) Y

History Elective Courses

HIST 6310 Early American History (3 semester hours) The study of specific themes and/or periods in American history through the American Revolution. Topics may vary. (May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 credit hours.) (3-0) T
HIST 6320 America in the Nineteenth Century (3 semester hours)
The study of specific themes and/or periods in American history in the nineteenth century. Topics may include the Civil War and Reconstruction. Topics may vary. (May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 credit hours.) (3-0) T
HIST 6325 America in the Twentieth Century (3 semester hours)
The study of specific themes and/or periods of American history in the twentieth century. Topics may include World War I, World War II, and the Civil Rights Era. Topics may vary. (May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 credit hours.) (3-0) T
HIST 6330 Regional and Area History in the United States (3 semester hours)
The study of themes related to the history of specific regions of the United States, for example the South, the Southwest, and Texas. Topics may vary. (May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 6 credit hours.) (3-0) T
HIST 6340 European and World History (3 semester hours)
The study of specific themes and/or periods in the history of Europe and the world. Topics may vary. (May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 credit hours.) (3-0) T
HIST 7399 Special Topics in History (3 semester hours) If taken as an independent studies course may count toward minimum course requirements for the M.A. degree. 
(May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 hours.) (3-0) R
HIST 8303 Independent Readings in History (3 semester hours
)  (May be repeated for credit.) (3-0) R
HIST 8305 Independent Research in History (3 semester hours
)  (May be repeated for credit.) (3-0) R

Humanities Core Courses

HUMA 5300 Interdisciplinary Approaches to the Arts and Humanities (3 semester hours) Introduction to interdisciplinary approaches to the arts and humanities, including concepts of inquiry and interpretation that form the theoretical bases of the graduate programs, seminars, workshops, and studios. Required of all degree candidates for the Master of Arts, Master of Arts in Teaching, and Doctor of Philosophy in Humanities.  (3-0) S
HUED 5300 (ED 5300) The Interdisciplinary Teaching of the Arts and Humanities in the Secondary School (3 semester hours) Approaches to the interdisciplinary teaching of the arts and humanities at the secondary level. Each student will design a curriculum unit to be taught from an interdisciplinary perspective.
Required of students seeking the Master of Arts in Teaching. (3-0) Y
HUMA 6V81 Special Topics in Humanities (1-9 semester hours) Topics vary from semester to semester.
May be repeated for credit as topics vary. ([1-9]-0) S

Humanities Elective Courses

Aesthetic Studies

HUAS 6303 Performance Literature, Theory, and Criticism (3 semester hours) Examination of a wide range of performance and theatrical traditions and texts. Using various critical and theoretical perspectives, the focus will be on the interplay between textual analysis, theoretical and critical frames, and performance. Topics will vary. (May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 credit hours.) (3-0) T
HUAS 6305 Criticism, Interpretation, and Performance (3 semester hours)
An investigation of the interrelationship among the activities of criticizing, interpreting, and performing artistic texts. Examples may be drawn from literature, theater, performance art, web and inter-media applications, film/video, music, and the visual arts. The course will include an exploration of the effects of various cultural and theoretical perspectives on our response to specific works. (3-0) T
HUAS 6313
The Business of the Arts (3 semester hours) Exploration of effective means to find, create, and manage markets and audiences for works of art. Topics may include digital media, visual or performing arts, museum studies, and arts management. (May be repeated for credit as topics vary to a maximum of 6 credit hours.) (3-0) T
HUAS 6315
The Arts in Historical Contexts (3 semester hours) Studies in one or more arts of various places and historical periods. Topics will vary, but may focus on a particular movement (e.g., Surrealism), a specific era (e.g., the Renaissance), or a place (e.g., Paris in the early twentieth century). (May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 credit hours.) (3-0) Y
HUAS 6318 The Arts and Their Institutions (3 semester hours) Studies of the institutions that shape and present the visual and performing arts by providing their physical, administrative, and financial “frames”: art museums, theaters, symphony associations, performance consortiums, or private foundations. The course will focus selectively on these institutions, grouping them for study in various ways depending on the interests and expertise of the instructor. Topics may vary.
(May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 6 credit hours.) (3-0) T
HUAS 6320 Studies in Experimental Traditions (3 semester hours) Studies in the works of artists whose experimentation with forms of expression breaks new ground in the arts and demands changes in the aesthetic perception of the public. The course will focus on such experimental movements as modernism, postmodernism and various avant-gardes that form the new tradition of the contemporary arts.
(May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 credit hours.) (3-0) T
HUAS 6324 Spaces of Display and Performance (3 semester hours)
Usually art works and performances are encountered in specific ritualized spaces designed for them and exerting strong influence on their character. The course will address such spaces critically from the point of view of architecture, theories of display, and concepts of ritual spectatorship. (3-0) T
HUAS 6330 Studies in the Visual Arts (3 semester hours) Explorations in various forms of the visual arts.
The course may focus on a specific form (e.g., painting, sculpture, film, photography) or interrelations among visual forms. Emphasis will be on the understanding of the creative process underlying the finished work. Topics may vary. (May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 credit hours.) (3-0) T
HUAS 6331 Studies in Music (3 semester hours) Studies in forms of musical expression. Topics will vary, but the course will emphasize the nature, development, and artistic possibilities of various forms of music. Courses may relate music to developments in other arts.
(May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 6 credit hours.) (3-0) T
HUAS 6340 Studies in Theater and Dance (3 semester hours)
An investigation of theater, performance art, inter-media, and/or dance as forms of art. The course will relate to and incorporate trends in other arts and contemporary intellectual and cultural movements, theories and critical issues. Topics may vary. (May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 6 credit hours.) (3-0) T
HUAS 6345 Shakespeare in Performance (3 semester hours) Studies of Shakespeare’s plays, examining varied artistic and scholarly interpretations in film and performance. The course will blend lectures, discussions, and practical skill-based exercises and may include scholarly and/or creative projects.
Meant for aspiring writers, actors, directors, and teachers, with or without experience in performing. Topics may vary. (May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 6 semester hours.) (3-0) T
HUAS 6350 Creating Poetry (3 semester hours) An investigation in a workshop environment of the aesthetics of the art and creation of poetry, focusing on the creative techniques and processes involved in producing poems and song lyrics in a variety of formalist, free verse, and experimental forms that combine verbal, written art with the visual and performing arts. Topics may vary.
(May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 credit hours.) (3-0) T
HUAS 6351 Creating Novels (3 semester hours) An investigation in a workshop environment of the aesthetics of the art and creation of the novel, focusing on the creative techniques and processes involved in producing novels in a variety of lyrical, experimental, and traditional forms that combine verbal, written art with the visual and performing arts. Topics may vary.
(May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 credit hours.) (3-0) T
HUAS 6352 Creating Television and Movie Scripts (3 semester hours) An investigation in a workshop environment of the aesthetics of art and creation of movie, multimedia, video, and television scripts, focusing on the creative techniques and processes involved in producing scripts in a variety of experimental and traditional forms that combine verbal, written art with acting, filmmaking, and production. Topics may vary.
(May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 credit hours.) (3-0) T
HUAS 6353 Creating Plays and Musicals (3 semester hours) An investigation in a workshop environment of the aesthetics of art and creation of drama, focusing on the creative techniques and processes involved in producing plays and musicals in a variety of experimental and traditional forms that combine verbal, written art with the musical and dramatic arts. Topics may vary.
(May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 credit hours.) (3-0) T
HUAS 6373 Studies in Film (3 semester hours)
An investigation into aspects of motion picture history, criticism, and aesthetics. Topics will vary but may include genre study, studies in national cinemas, or analysis of the social significance of films. Course may include exercises in filmmaking. (May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 credit hours.) (3-0) T
HUAS 6375 Imagery and Iconography (3 semester hours)
The study of the visual image and its use. Topics may include the nature of the visual image, our perception and interpretation of visual images, the relation of the visual to the verbal image, and the ways in which visual images are used in art to shape our imagination. Topics may vary. (May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 6 credit hours.) (3-0) T
HUAS 6391 Creativity: Visual Arts Workshop (3 semester hours)
A workshop emphasizing the creation of artistic works in a specific area of the visual arts (e.g., painting, drawing, photography, sculpture). Topics, such as narrative representation or the study of a genre, are explored to examine the theoretical basis guiding practice. Topics may vary. (May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 credit hours). (3-0) Y
HUAS 6392 Creativity: Image/Text Workshop (3 semester hours)
An exploration of the visual possibilities inherent in the art of the text. Topics may include an investigation of techniques derived from various media that foster the transformation and combination of words and images. The problem of creating text for a visual environment will be examined. Topics may vary. (May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 credit hours.) (3-0) T
HUAS 6393 Creativity: Time-Based Arts Workshop (3 semester hours) Exploration of the conceptual demands inherent in time-based visual art. Topics may include interactive visual arts, installation, kinetic art, computer animation, and video processes. The potential of narrative models may be examined. Topics may vary.
(May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 credit hours.) (3-0) T
HUAS 6394 Creativity: Performance (3 semester hours)
A skills-based course intended to enable the exploration, development, and realization of a performance expression. Project-focused, the course may include playwrighting, adaptation of non-dramatic or oral history sources, or be guided by specific text(s), improvisation, inter-cultural or inter-media explorations. Topics may vary. (May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 credit hours.) (3-0) Y
HUAS 6395 Creating Short Fiction (3 semester hours) An investigation in a workshop environment of the aesthetics of the art and creation of the short story and the novella, focusing on the creative techniques and processes involved in producing short stories in a variety of experimental and traditional forms that combine verbal, written art with the visual and performing arts. Topics may vary.
(May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 credit hours.)(3-0) T
HUAS 6396 Creating Nonfictions (3 semester hours) This workshop will draw from one or several nonfiction genres such as portraiture, historical accounts, essays, biography, and autobiography and will show how they are realized using techniques by the creation of art. Topics may vary but may include visual artists, filmmakers, composers, or other artists.
(May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 credit hours.) (3-0) T
HUAS
6399  Music in Historical Context (3 semester hours) Study of music in society: dates, periods, genres, style characteristics, major figures, representative masterworks, political/economical/social climate, corollaries in literature, theatre, visual art. (May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 credit hours) (3-0) T
HUAS 6608 Performance Training (6 semester hours) Intensive workshop-based course focusing on training and performance techniques to develop skills and methods for creating new performance. Activities include physical and vocal training, performance games and exercises, and will focus on methods, strategies, and processes of creation.
Special attention to the performer’s relation to’ text’ exploration and evolution. (May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 12 credit hours.) (6-0) T
HUAS 6609 Music Performance (6 semester hours)
Applied study of instrumental/vocal techniques, interpretation, repertoire building and performance practice. (May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 12 credit hours)  (6-0) T
HUAS 7301 Art and Society (3 semester hours)
This course explores the many forms of interaction between the arts and the society in which they exist. Topics may include the role of the artist in society, the representation of social and religious values in art, or the influence of art and the artist upon society. Topics may vary. (May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 credit hours.) (3-0) T
HUAS 7304 Critical Theory and the Visual Arts (3 semester hours) A mapping of the relations between the visual arts and new critical theories from structuralism to post-structuralism.
Focus will vary but may include semiotics, deconstruction, feminism, or psychoanalysis. (May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 credit hours.)(3-0)T
HUAS 7310 Art and Authorship (3 semester hours)
The study of the role of the maker in the creation of art. Topics vary but may include visual artists, filmmakers, composers, writers, or other artists. (May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 credit hours.) (3-0) T
HUAS 7350 Creating Nonfictions: Advanced (3 semester hours)
An intensive investigation into the theory, aesthetics, and creation of biographies, autobiographies, and historical accounts in a workshop environment that will explore the boundaries between fiction and non-fiction and between art and reality. Permission of the instructor and previous completion of HUAS 6396 are required. (May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 credit hours.) (3-0) T
HUAS 7351 Creating Short Stories: Advanced (3 semester hours) An intensive investigation into the theories, aesthetics, and creation of the short story in a workshop environment that will focus both on structure and on creative techniques and creative process involved in producing sophisticated, challenging, and linguistically developed short stories. Permission of the instructor and previous completion of HUAS 6395 are required. Topics may vary.
(May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 credit hours.) (3-0) T
HUAS 7352 Creating Poetry: Advanced (3 semester hours) An intensive investigation into the forms (both ancient and modern), theories, and creations of poetry in a workshop environment that will focus on the creative techniques and processes involved in producing formalist, lyrical, free verse, and experimental poetry. Permission of the instructor and previous completion of HUAS 6350 are required.
(May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 credit hours.) (3-0) T
HUAS 7353 Creating Novels: Advanced (3 semester hours) An intensive investigation of the changing structural history, artistic development, and creation of the novel in a workshop environment that will focus on the creative techniques and the creative process involved in producing novels in a variety of realistic, minimal, lyrical, experimental, and traditional forms. Permission of the instructor and completion of a minimum of six hours of creative writing (fiction or nonfiction) at the graduate level are required.
(May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 credit hours.) (3-0) T
HUAS 7354 Creating Scripts: Advanced (3 semester hours) An intense investigation of the theory, history, aesthetics, art, and creation of play, movie, and television scripts in a workshop environment that will focus on the creative techniques and processes involved not only in the creation of film, play, and television scripts, but also in the production of plays, films, and television episodes. Permission of the instructor and previous completion of either HUAS6352 or HUAS6353 required.
(May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 credit hours.) (3-0) T
HUAS 7355 Interdisciplinary Studies in Music (3 semester hours) Study of music in relation to one or more of the other arts/disciplines: literature, theatre, dance, visual art, cinema, history, psychology, technology, etc. (May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 credit hours) (3-0) T
HUAS 7390 Special Topics in Aesthetic and Performance Studies (3 semester hours) If taken as an independent studies course may count toward minimum course requirements for the M.A. or Ph.D. degree.
(May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 credit hours.) (3-0) R
HUAS 7601 Advanced Music Performance (6 semester hours)
Applied study of advanced instrumental/vocal techniques, interpretive insights, repertoire building and historical performance practice. (May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 12 credit hours) (6-0) T
HUAS 8303 Independent Readings in Aesthetic and Performance Studies (3 semester hours) (May be repeated for credit.) (3-0) R
HUAS 8305 Independent Research in Aesthetic and Performance Studies (3 semester hours) (May be repeated for credit.) (3-0) R

History of Ideas

HUHI 6300 History of Early Modern Thought (3 semester hours) Introduction to and examination of the authors and texts influential in shaping Western culture through the eighteenth century. The course will treat philosophy as well as social, political, and religious thought during particular periods. Topics will vary. (May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 6 hours.) (3-0) T
HUHI 6301 History of Modern Thought (3 semester hours) Introduction to and examination of the authors and texts influential in shaping modern Western culture since 1800.
The course will treat philosophy as well as social, political, and religious thought during particular periods. Topics will vary. (May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 6 hours.) (3-0) T
HUHI 6305 Ideas In Contexts (3 semester hours) The study of an idea or ideas as developed in specific cultural circumstances, for example, the idea of revolution considered in theory as well as in its actualization in the American Revolution, the French Revolution, the Bolshevik Revolution, Maoism, etc. Topics may vary.
(May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 credit hours.) (3-0) T
HUHI 6313 Thought, Culture, and Society in Europe (3 semester hours) Themes in the intellectual and cultural life of European societies. Topics may vary.
(May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 credit hours.) (3-0) Y
HUHI 6314 Thought, Culture, and Society in the United States (3 semester hours) Themes in the intellectual and cultural history of the United States. The course will focus on the writings of key thinkers chosen from different periods and on placing these writings within their intellectual and social contexts. Topics may vary.
(May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 6 credit hours.) (3-0) Y
HUHI 6325 Movements in Thought and Culture (3 semester hours)
The study of movements in thought and culture through a variety of perspectives, but emphasizing their intellectual bases: e.g., the Enlightenment, Romanticism, etc. Topics may vary. (May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 credit hours.) (3-0) T
HUHI 6340 Readings in American Culture (3 semester hours)
An examination of the ways in which Americans have defined themselves, and been defined by others, over time. Works read will be drawn from a variety of genres and will include studies of myth and symbol. Topics may vary. (May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 6 credit hours.) (3-0)T
HUHI 6342 American Political Cultures (3 semester hours)
An inquiry into the development of political cultures in the United States since the late eighteenth century. Emphasis on how the apparatus of the state (courts, legislatures, elections, schools, asylums, the military) has provided formal frameworks for ongoing cultural contests among diverse Americans over the meanings of citizenship, family, work, property, nature, health, and privacy. (3-0) T
HUHI 6345
The Woman Question (3 semester hours) The study of how particular cultures and/or thinkers have defined the “woman question.” Subjects may include particular geographical regions, major literary or historical movements and events. Topics may vary. (May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 credit hours.) (3-0) T
HUHI 6347 Topics in Feminist Philosophy (3 semester hours) Examination of various topics in metaphysics, ethics, philosophy of science, philosophy of language, philosophy of mind, or philosophy of religion from feminist perspectives.
(May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 credit hours.) (3-0) T
HUHI 6348 Studies in Asian History (3 semester hours) Studies in the history, philosophy, and cultures of Asia.  Topics may include Silk Roads and Women in Traditional China.  (May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 credit hours) (3-0) T
HUHI 7320 Constructions of Sexuality (3 semester hours)
The study of how sexuality has been defined by and linked to particular ideas in Western culture. Subjects may include the interrelationships between sexuality and ideas such as perversion, love, and violence; the examination of particular genres such as pornography, film, or novels; and/or an exploration of theoretical and historical scholarship. (May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 6 credit hours.) (3-0) T
HUHI 7330
The History of Hermeneutics (3 semester hours) Studies in the history of hermeneutics as a biblical-philological method and its transformation by the modern German tradition into a philosophical approach to language and experience. Focus on the work of Schleiermacher, Dilthey, Heidegger, and Gadamer. (3-0) T
HUHI 7332 Topics in Recent Continental Philosophy (3 semester hours) Close textual study of the works of leading continental philosophers such as Nietzsche, Derrida, Foucault, Heidegger, Husserl, and others.
Topics will vary. (May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 6 credit hours.) (3-0) R
HUHI 7335 Philosophical Topics in the Analytic Tradition (3 semester hours) Examination of philosophical issues arising from or inspired by the works of Russell, Wittgenstein,
Frege, Carnap, and their heirs, including Popper, Quine, and Sellars. (May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 6 credit hours.) (3-0) R
HUHI 7340 New Currents in the History of Ideas (3 semester hours) Exploration of significant recent approaches that represent major disciplinary and interdisciplinary contributions to the field.
With emphasis on theory and method, focus falls upon critical study of new interests that include “new” social and cultural histories, mentalities, poststructuralism, feminism, critical theory, institutionalist history, hermeneutics, among others. Topics may vary. (May be repeated for credit to maximum of 6 credit hours.) (3-0) T
HUHI 7345 The Holocaust (3 semester hours) An examination of the event, its background and consequences, with emphasis on the political, psychological, theological, and artistic responses it has engendered.
(May be repeated for credit to maximum of 6 credit hours.) (3-0) Y
HUHI 7355 Perceptions of the Past (3 semester hours) Approaches to perceiving, reconstructing, appreciating, and analyzing the past. Formal
historiographical methods, the fictionalization of the past, or the understanding of memory and nostalgia may be emphasized. (3-0) T
HUHI 7368 Topics in Thought and Society (3 semester hours) Studies in ideas, institutions, and applied history. The approach may be comparative or limited to a single cultural or geographical area. Topics will vary.
(May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 credit hours.) (3-0) R
HUHI 7375 Space, Time, and Culture (3 semester hours) Study of the relationship between changing philosophic and scientific concepts of space and time and forms of cultural expression such as art, literature, and music. (3-0) T
HUHI 7379 Philosophical Issues and the Humanities (3 semester hours) An investigation of the ways the humanities contribute to an understanding of such philosophical problems as hermeneutics, moral education, life and death, race, gender and sexual orientation, and the environment.
(May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 credit hours.) (3-0) T
HUHI 7386 Artist and Writer in Society (3 semester hours) Inquiries into the role of creative artists (e.g., painters, sculptors, musicians, writers, filmmakers) in various places and times.
Topics may vary. (May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 6 credit hours.) (3-0) T
HUHI 7387 Science and Technology in Western Culture (3 semester hours) Topics will vary but may include consideration of the philosophical or historical basis for the evolution of scientific thought; the problem of conceptual change in the study of the fundamental character of technology and its impact on culture.
(May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 6 credit hours.) (3-0) T
HUHI 7391 Women in European Society (3 semester hours) A historical examination of the varied experiences of European women, focusing on work, family life, political action, sexuality, and cultural expression.
May emphasize early modern or modern period. (May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 6 credit hours.) (3-0) T
HUHI 7393 Feminist Methodologies (3 semester hours)
An investigation of the various types of feminist methodologies and their application to philosophical and historical issues. Methodologies to be addressed may include Marxist and socialist feminism, phenomenological feminisms, liberal feminism, and radical feminism. (May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 6 credit hours.) (3-0) T
HUHI 7397 Women in American Society (3 semester hours) A historical examination of the varied experiences of American women, focusing on work, family life, political action, sexuality, and cultural expression.
May emphasize early modern or modern period. (May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 6 credit hours.) (3-0) T
HUHI 7399 Special Topics in the History of Ideas (3 semester hours) If taken as an independent studies course may count toward minimum course requirements for the M.A. or Ph.D. degree.
(May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 hours.) (3-0) R
HUHI 8303 Independent Readings in History of Ideas (3 semester hours) (May be repeated for credit.) (3-0)R
HUHI 8305 Independent Research in History of Ideas (3 semester hours) (May be repeated for credit.) (3-0)R

Studies In Literature

HUSL 6304 Studies in Literary Themes (3 semester hours) Examinations of specific themes as they appear in various literary works and traditions. Themes considered in courses may include love, heroism, feminism, the anti-hero, or revolution. Topics may vary. (May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 credit hours.) (3-0) T
HUSL 6308 Studies in Literary Forms and Genres (3 semester hours) Studies in various literary genres, either individually or in relation to each other. Among topics considered will be the difficulties of defining genres, the nature of specific genres, their historical and aesthetic development, and their artistic possibilities. Genres for discussion may include tragedy, comedy, the novel, and various forms of poetic expression. Topics may vary.
(May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 credit hours.) (3-0) Y
HUSL 6309 Literary Movements (3 semester hours) Studies in the nature of intellectual and artistic movements, with emphasis on how they affect literary expression. Examples of such movements are romanticism, naturalism, modernism, and postmodernism. Topics may vary.
(May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 credit hours). (3-0) Y
HUSL 6310 Studies in Literary Interpretation (3 semester hours) Study of the issues involved in the attempt to interpret dramatic, poetic, and fictional texts. Emphasis will be placed on the writing of interpretive essays and on the exploration of how various cultural and intellectual perspectives as well as different theoretical stances affect the reading of a specific text. Topics may vary. (3-0) T
HUSL 6312 Major Authors (3 semester hours) Study of one or more major literary figures, such as Dante, Chaucer, Milton, Cervantes, Goethe, Austen, Blake, Balzac, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Mann, Eliot, Pound, Woolf, Faulkner, Paz or Borges.
(May be repeated for credit as subjects vary to a maximum of 9 credit hours.) (3-0) Y
HUSL 6315 Literary Theory (3 semester hours) Consideration of major literary theories, such as new criticism, deconstruction, gender studies, and chaos theory, with emphasis on how these theories influence and modify the interpretation of literary and other artistic texts. Topics may vary. (3-0) T
HUSL 6330 Studies in Literature and the Other Arts (3 semester hours)
An examination of the links between literature and music, the visual arts, film, theater, and/or dance. Topics and approaches will vary but may include, for example, the fantastic in literature and visual arts, structures in literature and music, adaptations of novels into film, and the pastoral in literature and the visual arts. (May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 credit hours.) (3-0) T
HUSL 6340 Literature Before 1800 (3 semester hours) Studies in the literature and culture of selected periods in the Western tradition.
May focus on ancient, medieval, or early modern periods. Topics may vary. (May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 hours) (3-0) T
HUSL 6350 Literature of the Nineteenth Century (3 semester hours) Studies in the literature and culture of the nineteenth century.
May focus on British, European, American, or Latin American contexts. Topics may vary. (May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 hours) (3-0) T
HUSL 6355 Literature, Science, and Culture (3 semester hours) Seminar emphasizing the treatment in literature of scientific concepts (e.g., relativity, evolution) and technological developments (e.g., computers, virtual reality) of particular importance. Topics may vary.
(May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 6 credit hours.) (3-0) T
HUSL 6360 Literature of the Twentieth Century (3 semester hours) Studies in the literature and culture of the twentieth century. May focus on British, European
,  American, or Latin American contexts. Topics may vary. (May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 hours) (3-0) T
HUSL 6370 Studies in Literature and Ideas (3 semester hours) Studies of the relationship between selected literary texts and major ideas in philosophy, science, and politics. The course will examine systems of thoughts as they are incorporated, delineated, and explored in literature. Topics may vary.
(May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 6 credit hours.) (3-0) Y
HUSL 6372 Literature and Society (3 semester hours) Seminar studying the values and concerns of various social groups through a study of literary texts, including consideration of the role of literature and the writer in given societies. Topics may vary.
(May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 credit hours.) (3-0) Y
HUSL 6378 Literature and the Holocaust (3 semester hours) Seminar considering both major literary works (novels, short stories, and poems) written under the impact of the Holocaust as well as literary theories responding to these texts. Some emphasis placed on films and other works of visual art.
(3-0) T
HUSL 6390 Theory and Practice in Literary Studies (3 semester hours) Group projects integrating the interpretation of literary texts or themes with experiments in creative writing and performance.
Topics may vary. (May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 credit hours.) (3-0) T
HUSL 6396 Spanish Language, Literature, and Culture (3 semester hours) Studies in the language, various literary movements, or the general cultures of Spanish-speaking peoples in Europe or Latin America. Topics may vary.
(May be repeated for credit as topics vary to a maximum of 9 credit hours.) (3-0) R
HUSL 6398 World Literatures (3 semester hours) Studies in literatures from specific regions, ethnic groups, and nationalities within and outside the United States.
(May be repeated for credit as topic varies to a maximum of 9 credit hours.) (3-0) T
HUSL 6399 Studies in Asian Literature (3 semester hours) Studies in the literature and cultures of Asia. Topics may include Zen/Chan History, Thought, and Poetry; Confucianism
,; and the I-Ching (Book of Changes). (May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 credit hours) (3-0) T
HUSL 7321 The Art and Craft of Translation (3 semester hours) Workshop designed to provide students with a model not only of literary interpretation but also of an interdisciplinary approach through the act of translating that can be applied to a wide range of texts and issues. Emphasis is on the actual translation of literary texts from another language into English. Issues involved in this process will form the basis of the workshop’s theoretical component.
(May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 credit hours.) (3-0) S
HUSL 7322 Advanced Translation Workshop (3 semester hours) An intensive investigation in a workshop environment of the aesthetics of the art and craft of literary translation focusing on the techniques and processes involved in producing English translations of poetic, dramatic, fictional, and essayistic works. Students are expected to produce publishable translations primarily of works by contemporary international writers. Discussions will include the history and theory of literary translation. Permission of the instructor or previous completion of HUSL 7321 required. (3-0) T
HUSL 7323 Critical Approaches to Translation (3 semester hours)
The study of the various approaches to the history, theory, and criticism of literary and humanistic translation. Topics may include the translator’s working methods, interviews with translators, multiple translations, the changing nature of interpretive approaches, theoretical models of translation, and criteria for the evaluation of translations. (May be repeated for credit as topics vary to a maximum of 6 credit hours.) (3-0) T
HUSL 7333 Special Topics in Rhetoric (3 semester hours) A seminar in historical and theoretical studies of rhetoric.
May include one or more topics such as ethos, histories of rhetoric, the rhetoric of technology and science, the Sophists, rhetoric as epistemic, key figures in rhetoric (e.g., Burke, Foucault, Baudrillard, Spivak, etc.). (May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 credit hours.) (3-0) R
HUSL 7334 Rhetoric Pedagogy Practicum (3 semester hours)
Supervised practicum in teaching rhetoric and composition, with various topics emphasizing rhetorical theory, composition pedagogy, and educational technology presented in a workshop setting. Enrollment required for teaching assistants assigned to sections of Rhetoric 1302, but not limited to such students. (May be repeated for credit.) (3-0) S
HUSL 7335 Digital
Rhetorics (3 semester hours) Covers a wide range of topics concerned with rhetoric and writing in digital environments. It is designed specifically to address forms of expression (written and visual) and interpretation (reading protocols) with emphasis on critical analysis of various discourses and discourse communities (and disciplines) in which rhetoric is central in the age of information technologies. (3-0) T
HUSL 7370 Studies in Literature and History (3 semester hours) Studies of selected literary texts and art movements in times of high political tension (American Revolution, Civil War, Weimar Germany, etc.) Topics may vary.
(May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 credit hours.) (3-0) T
HUSL 7384 The Nature of Language (3 semester hours) An inquiry into the nature, origins, and evolution of language, the relationship of language to thought and to creativity, language as a social tool, and nonverbal patterns of communication.
Survey of linguistic theory and method applicable to the study of the phonological, morphological, lexical, semantic, and syntactic levels of language. (3-0) Y
HUSL 7385 Applied Linguistics (3 semester hours) Techniques for comparing two or more languages.
The study of traditional and modern theories and practices of language learning and teaching. (3-0) Y
HUSL 7390 Special Topics in Literary Studies (3 semester hours) If taken as an independent studies course may count toward minimum course requirements for the M.A. or Ph.D. degree.
(May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 hours.) (3-0) R
HUSL 7391 Special Topics in Translation Studies (3 semester hours)
The investigation of the field of Translation Studies. Topics may include the anthropological foundation of translation; the study of crossing cultural barriers; translation methodologies as a model for interdisciplinary research; communication as translation; translation and reading; historical aspects of translation; models of cultural differences; critical approaches to the theories of translation from the Greeks to the present; and specific research and translation projects. If taken as an independent studies course may count toward minimum course requirements for the M.A. or Ph.D. degree. (May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 hours.) (3-0) R
HUSL 8303 Independent Readings in Literary Studies (3 semester hours) (May be repeated for credit.) (3-0)R
HUSL 8305 Independent Research in Literary Studies (3 semester hours) (May be repeated for credit.) (3-0)R

Education and General Courses

HUED 5353 (ED 5353) Teaching English as a Second Language (3 semester hours) Investigation of modern techniques of teaching English as a second language in relation to the general development of language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) in secondary schools. Contributions of modern linguistic science to both theory and practice. (3-0) Y
HUED 5360 Teaching Spanish (3 semester hours) Study of modern theories and practices of teaching Spanish, with a focus on pedagogical applications for students teaching foreign-language skills in secondary schools or community colleges. (3-0) T
HUMA 6320-6323 Review Courses in Foreign Languages (3 semester hours) Intensive grammar review to assist students in moving from intermediate to advanced work with foreign-language texts. Prerequisite: intermediate proficiency (usually equivalent to four semesters of undergraduate courses). The courses do not meet the language requirement or count in degree plans, but they are offered to help students prepare for the textual interpretation and translation undertaken in the language workshops. They are graded on a pass/fail basis. (3-0)Y
HUMA 6320 French Review
HUMA 6321 Spanish Review
HUMA 6323 German Review
HUMA 7320-7323 Advanced Workshops in Foreign Languages (3 semester hours) Advanced reading, interpretation, and translation of texts in the languages listed below. Prerequisite: at least intermediate proficiency (usually equivalent to four semesters of undergraduate courses); the appropriate review course HUMA 6320-6323 is also recommended. Although students earn regular grades in the workshops, they do not count toward minimum course requirements for the M.A. or Ph.D. degree, since they are offered to help students prepare for the program’s proficiency examinations. Each workshop concludes with a translation examination, which comprises both the course final and the program’s proficiency examination in the foreign language. (3-0) Y
HUMA 7320 French Workshop
HUMA 7321 Spanish Workshop
HUMA 7323 German Workshop
HUMA 7330-7335 Advanced Independent Studies in Foreign Languages (3 semester hours) Independent reading or research courses in which doctoral students may demonstrate advanced scholarly use of their chosen foreign languages. The courses satisfy the Ph.D. foreign-language requirement only after enrolled students have passed the appropriate proficiency examinations. Although students earn regular grades rather than pass/fail marks, the courses do not count toward the minimum requirements for the degree. Students interested in taking other languages may do so by special arrangement.  (3-0) R
HUMA 7330 Advanced French (May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 6 hours.)
HUMA 7331 Advanced Spanish (May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 6 hours.)
HUMA 7332 Advanced Italian (May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 6 hours.)
HUMA 7333 Advanced German (May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 6 hours.)
HUMA 7334 Advanced Classical Greek (May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 6 hours.)
HUMA 7335 Advanced Latin (May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 6 hours.)
HUMA 7390 Special Topics in Arts and Humanities (3 semester hours) If taken as an independent studies course may count toward minimum course requirements for the M.A. or Ph.D. degree.
(May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 hours.) (3-0) R
HUMA 8303 Independent Readings in Arts and Humanities (3 semester hours) (May be repeated for credit.) (3-0) R
HUMA 8305 Independent Research in Arts and Humanities (3 semester hours) (May be repeated for credit.) (3-0) R

Thesis, Casebook And Dissertation Courses

HIST 8398 Master’s Thesis (3 semester hours) (May be repeated for credit but only 6 hours will be counted toward M.A.) (3-0) R
HUED 8304 Master Of Arts
In Teaching Casebook (3 semester hours) (May be repeated for credit.) (3-0) R
HUMA 8V99 Ph.D. Dissertation (1-9 semester hours) (May be repeated for credit.) ([1-9]-0) R