Audiology Expert Traces Evolution of Field in U.S.

Feb. 6, 2009

Dr. James Jerger, distinguished scholar-in-residence in the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences, has devoted his career to audiological education and research. And with the recent publication of his 11th book, he is sharing much of what he has learned and experienced over the past 55 years.

Cover of books by Dr. James Jerger

Audiology in the USA, a 100-page book devoted to the history of audiology, was written with one audience in mind: students.

As a mentor for UT Dallas doctoral students pursuing careers in audiology and communication sciences and disorders, Jerger believes that students cannot learn too much about the history of audiology.

“There have been so many advances in the field of audiology over the past 50 years,” said Jerger. “Without fully understanding how the field has evolved, students tend to lose perspective.”

Jerger spent the past year writing the book and discovered a lot of information that he found to be very enlightening.

“For many years, hearing conservation was virtually ignored,” said Jerger. “It wasn’t until the invention of the jet engine, when people started noticing the negative effects of excessive noise. The U.S. Navy and Air Force were instrumental in shining a light on this particular topic and implementing safeguards.”

In addition to the early years, the book includes recent advances in diagnostic testing, screening and treatment.

A book-signing party in Jerger’s honor will take place at the American Academy of Audiology conference in Dallas in April.


Media Contact: Debra Brown, UT Dallas, (214) 905-3049, debra@utdallas.edu
or the Office of Media Relations, UT Dallas, (972) 883-2155, newscenter@utdallas.edu

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Dr. James Jerger

“There have been so many advances in the field of audiology over the past 50 years. Without fully understanding how the field has evolved, students tend to lose perspective,” said Dr. James Jerger, distinguished scholar-in-residence in the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences.

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