Architecture Award Honors Center for BrainHealth

June 8, 2009

The UT Dallas Center for BrainHealth has been selected for a 2009 Texas Society of Architects Design Award.

Only 12 of the 261 entries earned this recognition.

Photographs of architectural firm HKS’ winning Center for BrainHealth renovation design will be published in the September/October issue of Texas Architect magazine. The project will also be acknowledged at the Texas Society of Architects' convention in Houston in late October.

“The inspired brilliance of the architectural design by Kyley Harvey of HKS is the perfect context for the life-changing brain science taking place within,” said Dr. Sandi Chapman, chief director of the center. “When researchers and staff members enter the building, the innovative design frees the mind to unleash incredible creativity.”

HKS renovated the concrete-heavy, nearly 4-decade-old structure into a modern, 63,000-square-foot research facility. The building, which rests on a tree-laden, 3.5-acre site, opened in September 2006, and the building was formally dedicated on January 26, 2007.

“This is a great accomplishment for BrainHealth and HKS,” Kyley Harvey, lead HKS designer on the project. The remodel began in June 2005 and was completed 15 months later.

The Texas Society of Architects, the Lone Star State Chapter of the American Institute of Architects, promotes societal benefits of the architectural profession in Texas.

Jurors who selected the 12 honorees were Philip Freelon, president of the Freelon Group in Raleigh-Durham, N.C.; Mary Margaret Jones, president of San Francisco-based landscape architecture firm Hargreaves Associates; and Rick Joy, founding principal of Rick Joy Architects in Tucson, Ariz.


Media Contact: Audrey Glickert, UT Dallas, (972) 883-4320, audrey.glickert@utdallas.edu
or the Office of Media Relations, UT Dallas, (972) 883-2155, newscenter@utdallas.edu

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the Center for BrainHealth

HKS renovated the nearly 4-decade-old structure into a modern, 63,000-square-foot research facility.

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