Photos Captured Civil Rights History in the Making

Exhibit Displays Images from the Comer Collection’s Mother Jones Portfolio

Feb. 5, 2010

The School of Arts and Humanities presents “Photojournalism of the Civil Rights Movement: A View of the Cold War’s Home Front,” made up of photographs from the Mother Jones Civil Rights Portfolio of the Comer Collection.

The exhibition, which traces the arc of the civil rights movement by capturing some of the most poignant episodes of the struggle, runs Feb. 9 - March 26 in the Cecil and Ida Green Center at UT Dallas.

Curated by UT Dallas doctoral candidate Matt Hinckley, the collection includes photographs by Leonard Freed, Charles Moore, Dan Weiner, Flip Schulke and Gordon Parks, among many others.

An opening reception and gallery talk by Hinckley will be held at the Green Center on Tuesday, Feb. 9, at 2:00 p.m.

In addition, a panel discussion on collecting photography is scheduled for Thursday, Feb. 25, at 7:30 p.m. in Room AS 1.105 of the Visual Arts Building.

The event has been organized by Marilyn Waligore, professor of aesthetic studies and photography at UT Dallas. The panel will include Dr. Charissa Terranova, assistant professor of aesthetic studies at UT Dallas; Lorraine Davis, a writer and consultant; and Burt and Missy Finger, of the Photographs Do Not Bend Gallery. 

Both events are free and open to the general public.

The Jerry and Marilyn Comer Photography Collection at UT Dallas contains almost 100 photographs and includes important examples of mid- to late-20th century American photography.

Highlights of the collection include examples of documentary photography and photojournalism, modern and contemporary American landscape photography, and postmodern photography.


More Information: School of Arts and Humanities Events, www.utdallas.edu/ah/events
Media Contact:
Sarah Stockton, UT Dallas, 972-883-4320, sarah.stockton@utdallas.edu

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Photo by Gordon Parks

The collection includes such iconic prints as “American Gothic” by Gordon Parks.

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