2nd Mosquito Spraying Over Campus Planned Monday

Measures Intended to Reduce Threat of Mosquitoes Carrying West Nile Virus

Aug. 16, 2012

Aug. 20, 2012

The city of Richardson and Dallas County report that the UT Dallas campus will be included in a second aerial spraying for mosquito control in Richardson beginning at 9 p.m. Monday, Aug. 20.

UT Dallas was sprayed initially on Friday evening. The second spraying will target any mosquito larvae that have hatched since the first spraying.

Richardson is just one city included in the aerial operation, so the arrival time of planes over campus is not certain.

Plans are subject to change based on weather and other factors.

Campus residents and those working on and visiting campus are advised to stay indoors during scheduled spraying times. Windows should be closed. Pets should be kept inside.

Aug. 18, 2012

The city of Richardson and Dallas County report that the UT Dallas campus was sprayed for mosquito control Friday evening as planned, as were other areas of Richardson north of Campbell Road. However, poor weather conditions forecast for this weekend have delayed aerial spraying for other areas south of Campbell Road until 9 p.m. Sunday.

Aug. 16, 2012

Dallas County has scheduled a second aerial spraying on Friday, Aug. 17, to complete coverage of the areas of Richardson west of U.S. 75, including the UT Dallas campus. Rain halted the aerial spraying on Thursday night.

Residents are advised to stay indoors during the aerial spraying beginning at 9 p.m.

With a higher than usual number of reported human cases of West Nile virus this summer in North Texas, UT Dallas is asking the campus community to take extra precautions in the remaining months of mosquito season.

Infection is caused by bites from mosquitoes carrying the virus, which can cause serious illness in a minority of cases. Preventing mosquito bites is the best way to avoid becoming infected with the West Nile virus.

The city of Richardson has joined other North Texas communities in approving aerial spraying to kill adult mosquitoes. Residents are being asked to stay indoors during the spraying.

The Centers for Disease Control has shown that serious human health effects due to public health insecticide applications are uncommon and generally not severe.

For more information, call the UT Dallas Student Health Center at 972-883-2747. For FAQs on West Nile virus, visit the Texas Department of State Health Services or the City of Richardson websites. The city of Richardson also has set up a call center to answer questions about the spraying at 972-744-4080.


Media Contact: Robin Russell, UT Dallas, (972) 883-4431, robin.russell@utdallas.edu
or the Office of Media Relations, UT Dallas, (972) 883-2155, newscenter@utdallas.edu.
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Campus Urged to Take Precautions
for Remainder of Mosquito Season

With a higher than usual number of reported human cases of West Nile virus this summer in North Texas, The University of Texas at Dallas is asking the campus community to take extra precautions in the remaining months of mosquito season.

Infection is caused by bites from mosquitoes carrying the virus, which can cause serious illness in a minority of cases. Preventing mosquito bites is the best way to avoid becoming infected with the West Nile virus.

The Student Health Center at UT Dallas reminds students, staff and faculty to follow the Texas Department of State Health Services guidelines and remember the four Ds of protection:

  • Apply insect repellent containing DEET. Another effective option is to use permethrin, which should be applied only to clothing. Be sure to read label instructions on any repellent.
  • DRESS in long sleeves and pants when you are outside.
  • Stay indoors at DUSK and DAWN, when infected mosquitoes are most active.
  • DRAIN standing water in your backyard and neighborhood; old tires, flowerpots and clogged rain gutters are mosquito-breeding sites.

Throughout the summer, the UT Dallas Facilities Management staff has been placing mosquito dunks in any standing water on campus, which prevents mosquito larvae from hatching. A retention pond on Cottonwood Creek that had been drained in August to remove vegetation is now flowing again with an aerator back in operation, making it an unfriendly environment for mosquito breeding.

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