Center for U.S.-Mexico Studies to Host Lectures

Sep. 6, 2012

The Mexican presidential elections, Carlos Fuentes’ literature and the use of technology to understand Mexican culture will be among topics discussed at The Center for U.S.-Mexico Studies’ 12th annual Lecture Series at The University of Texas at Dallas.

Rodolfo Hernandez

Dr. Rodolfo Hernandez

The series, which begins Thursday, Sept. 6, will also include a day of science experiments and exhibitions at the Mexican Consulate in Dallas and the sharing of bi-national notes on materials science research in Monterrey, Mexico.

“In the last 11 years, the Lecture Series has become a tradition of interdisciplinary and applied approaches to enhancing the debate and analysis of U.S. – Mexico relations,” said Dr. Rodolfo Hernandez, director of the Center for U.S.-Mexico Studies.

“One of the objectives of the series is to bring together Mexican and American scholars at UT Dallas to exchange ideas and creativity in order to strengthen existing bi-national agendas in literature, culture, materials science and nanotechnology – all while sharing knowledge with the greater community.”

Details of the series are available on the Center’s website.

“One of the objectives of the series is to bring together Mexican and American scholars at UT Dallas to exchange ideas and creativity in order to strengthen existing bi-national agendas in literature, culture, materials science and nanotechnology – all while sharing knowledge with the greater community.”

Dr. Rodolfo Hernandez,
director of the Center for U.S.– Mexico Studies

The Center for U.S.-Mexico Studies at UT Dallas was created in 1995 in recognition of the richness of the Mexican-American past, as well as the importance of Mexico to the United States. The center aims to provide curricula and exchange of faculty and students with Mexican universities, to conduct research and present lectures about issues of interest to both Mexico and the U.S., and to prepare individuals for leadership in the fields of business, politics, science, technology and the arts.

The series is co-sponsored by UT Dallas’ School of Arts and Humanities, the School of Economic, Political, and Policy Sciences; the Arts and Technology Program; the Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and Computer Science; the Mexican Association of Students, the University of Oregon; the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Smithsonian Institute, the Mexican Research Center for Advanced Materials (CIMAV), and the Mexican Council on Science and Technology (CONACYT).


Media Contact: Chaz Lilly, UT Dallas, (972) 883-4461, charles.lilly@utdallas.edu
or the Office of Media Relations, UT Dallas, (972) 883-2155, newscenter@utdallas.edu.

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2012-13 Lectures

 

2012 Mexican Elections: Outcomes and Interpretations

Monica Rankin, Monica Brussolo, and Rodolfo Hernandez
The University of Texas at Dallas, Founders North (FN) 2.104, Sept. 6, 1 p.m.

Carlos Fuentes: Literature and Life

Rene Prieto and Charles Hatfield
The University of Texas at Dallas, Erik Jonsson Academic Center (JO) 4.708, Sept. 18, 2.30 p.m.

Oaxaca Virtual

Carolina Dabbah
The University of Texas at Dallas, Erik Jonsson Academic Center (JO) 4.122, Nov. 8, 11.30 a.m.

Science in the Consulate

Adrian Avendano
Consulate General of Mexico in Dallas, 1210 River Bend Dr., Dallas  Nov. 9, 10 a.m.

Use of Nanoparticles for Catalysis or OPV’s:  A U.S. – Mexico Interaction

Diego Barrera Mendez and Paul Miguel Arevalo Rodriguez
CIMAV – Monterrey, Alianza Norte 202. Parque de Investigación e Innovación Tecnológica. Apodaca, Nuevo León, México, March 12, 2013, 10 a.m.
 

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