Thursday,
October 2, 2014

Category:

Callier Cares Luncheon Raises Record $150,000

Sara T. Martineau Receives the Ruth and Ken Altshuler Callier Care Award

Dr. Ken Altshuler and Ruth Altshuler presented the Ruth and Ken Altshuler Callier Care Award to honoree, Sara T. Martineau, shown with her husband David.

From left: Dr. Ken Altshuler and Ruth Altshuler presented the Ruth and Ken Altshuler Callier Care Award to honoree Sara T. Martineau, shown with her husband, David.

“Callier cares about me!” exclaimed young patients in a video shown at the Callier Cares Luncheon. This sentiment exemplifies the work of the Callier Center for Communication Disorders.

The third annual Callier Cares Luncheon raised a record $150,000 to benefit patients with speech, language and hearing disorders through the Callier Care Fund. The fund, created by Ruth and Ken Altshuler, provides patients with essential treatment regardless of their income level, insurance coverage or socioeconomic background.

The funds raised through the luncheon count toward the Callier Center's $8 million campaign goal as part of the University's $200 million Realize the Vision: The Campaign for Tier One & Beyond.

Betsy Cullum and Sissy Cullum chaired the luncheon.

Betsy Cullum and Sissy Cullum chaired the luncheon.

Friends of Callier, including more than 300 philanthropists, community partners, patients, researchers, faculty and staff, packed the Dallas Country Club to further Callier's mission to transform lives through treatment, training and research in communication disorders. The sold-out crowd also attended to honor long-standing Callier advocate Sara T. Martineau, who received the Ruth and Ken Altshuler Callier Care Award.

The annual award is presented to an individual or group who has contributed significantly to the betterment of the community and to advancing the care of patients with communication disorders.

Martineau’s dedication to Callier began more than 20 years ago when she chaired the Crystal Charity Ball in 1993, the year that Callier received funding for its cochlear implant program. She became a trustee of the Foundation for the Callier Center Board, served a two-year term as president and continues to be an active emeritus member. Martineau also helped create the Callier Cares Luncheon.

Terry Price, Director of Music at Preston Hollow Presbyterian Church and grateful patient, shown with his wife Alyce.

Terry Price, director of music at Preston Hollow Presbyterian Church and luncheon speaker, is shown with his wife, Alyce.

Ruth and Ken Altshuler were on hand to present the award. Ruth Altshuler quoted a letter that she wrote to Martineau 20 years ago, affirming that the message was just as pertinent today. “You’re the perfect example of what the best in a young Dallas woman stands for –– beautiful, charming, active and one who is making her life count.”

Martineau thanked her family, friends, UT Dallas and Callier.

“I am certainly humbled to receive this award named for two very esteemed people in Dallas,” Martineau said. “Because this award was established on the tenant of service to others, I am deeply honored to receive it and most gratified to be recognized in this particular capacity.”

She also expressed her appreciation for the leadership of luncheon chairs Betsy Cullum and Sissy Cullum.

“They have spent many months ensuring that this luncheon would be beautiful and successful, and I must say they achieved both,” she said.

In my opinion, you could go all around the world and not find better care or treatment options than those offered at the Callier Center. Callier, in all capital letters, spells H-O-P-E.

Terry Price,
director of music at Preston Hollow Presbyterian Church and Callier patient

Keynote speaker Terry Price, director of music at Preston Hollow Presbyterian Church and grateful patient, shared his battle with tinnitus. Price’s tinnitus, or ringing in the ears, began after a recording session at Abbey Road Studios in London where he conducted members of the London Philharmonic in 1983. The ringing never went away, and a few years ago it became unbearably loud and distorted how he heard music.

“Beautiful music became nightmares,” Price said. “I was convinced I’d have to retire early, and I was afraid of never being able to enjoy music again. I have experienced times when the tinnitus is so loud that I feel totally hopeless.”

Price visited different doctors, received MRIs and brain scans, and tried meditation and acupuncture, but his tinnitus just got louder. After months of struggling, he connected with Pat Mattingly, a fellow church member and Foundation for the Callier Center board trustee, who referred Price to the Callier Center.

“Without the great team of people at the Callier Center … I feel certain that I would not still be working in music, and I wouldn’t be the same person,” Price said.

“In my opinion, you could go all around the world and not find better care or treatment options than those offered at the Callier Center,” Price said. “Callier, in all capital letters, spells H-O-P-E.”

To contribute to the Callier Care Fund, please visit utdallas.edu/calliercenter/give.

Media Contact: Kristi Shewmaker, UT Dallas Callier Center for Communication Disorders, (214) 905-3019, kristi.shewmaker@utdallas.edu
or the Office of Media Relations, UT Dallas, (972) 883-2155, newscenter@utdallas.edu


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