2006-2008 Undergraduate Catalog (2007 Supplement)
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Biology Course Descriptions

All Biology Core courses, which are required for the B.S. and B.A. degrees, are offered fall and spring.

BIOL 1300 Body Systems with Lab (3 semester hours) Examines the organ systems of mammals, predominantly the human. Function in relation to structure is emphasized. The effects of one organ system on others are stressed. The overall objective of the course is an appreciation of the integration and control of all systems. There is a model-based human anatomy lab. This course is specifically designed for non-majors. (2-1) S
BIOL 1310 Basics of Biotechnology with Lab (3 semester hours) An introduction to basic biotechnology principles for those not majoring in the natural sciences. This course will introduce students to the general concepts and principles of the genetic revolution. The role of biotechnology in everyday life will be explored together with a discussion of the impact it presently plays (and will play) on our health, the environment, agriculture and industry. In the laboratory portion of the course students will purify and manipulate DNA and gene products, grow genetically modified organisms, and perform DNA fingerprinting. (2-1) T
BIOL 1318 (BIOL 2316) Human Genetics (3 semester hours) Elementary course in the fundamentals of human genetics. Topics include patterns of inheritance; DNA structure and replication; gene function; mutation and its role in genetic diseases, cancer, and the immune system; matters of sex; evolution; genetic engineering and gene therapy; forensics and bioethics. This course is specifically designed for non-majors. (3-0) Y
BIOL 1320 (BIOL 2320) The Microbial World with Lab (3 semester hours) Contributions of microorganisms to our world are explored. Topics include the involvement of microbes in many aspects of our daily lives, from helping to create the air we breathe to the production of foods (such as bread, cheese) and beverages (beer, wine). The laboratory component includes interactive experiments which complement the lecture topics. This course is specifically designed for non-majors. (2-2) Y
BIOL 1V00 Topics in Biological Sciences (1-6 semester hours) May be repeated as topics vary (6 hours maximum). ([1-6]-0) R
BIOL 1V01 Topics in Biological Sciences with Lab (1-6 semester hours) May be repeated as topics vary (6 hours maximum). ([1-5]-[1-5]) R
BIOL 1V95 Individual Instruction in Biology (1-6 semester hours) Individual study under a faculty member’s direction. Topics may vary. May be repeated for credit. Consent of instructor required. ([1-6]-0) S
BIOL 2111 Introduction to Modern Biology Workshop I (1 semester hour) Problem solving and discussion related to the subject matter in BIOL 2311. Corequisite: BIOL 2311. (1-0) S
BIOL 2112 Introduction to Modern Biology Workshop II (1 semester hour) Problem solving and discussion related to the subject matter in BIOL 2312. Corequisite: BIOL 2312. (1-0) S
BIOL 2281 Introductory Biology Laboratory (2 semester hours) Introductory lectures discuss the theoretical and historical aspects of the experiments carried out in the laboratory. Laboratory experiments introduce the student to bioinformatics, basic cellular biology, and structure and function of proteins and nucleic acids. Computer exercises in bioinformatics involve multiple alignment analyses, BLAST and literature searches, and construction of phylogenetic trees. Laboratory experiments include microscopy, microbial techniques, yeast genetics, and the electrophoretic behavior of normal and mutant proteins. DNA related experiments include isolation (nuclear and mtDNA), amplification, restriction digests, electrophoresis, plasmid mapping, and transformations. Students present posters of their long-term investigations at the end of the semester. Prerequisite: BIOL 2311 (also see prerequisites for BIOL 2311). ([0-1]-[1-2]) S
BIOL 2311 (BIOL 1306) Introduction to Modern Biology I (3 semester hours) Presentation of some of the fundamental concepts of modern biology, with an emphasis on the molecular and cellular basis of biological phenomena. Topics include the chemistry and metabolism of biological molecules, elementary classical and molecular genetics, and selected aspects of developmental biology, physiology (including hormone action), immunity, and neurophysiology. Prerequisites: CHEM 1311 and CHEM 1312 (General Chemistry I and II). Corequisite: BIOL 2111. (3-0) S
BIOL 2312 (BIOL 1307) Introduction to Modern Biology II (3 semester hours) Continuation of BIOL 2301. The overall emphasis will be on organ physiology and regulatory mechanisms involving individual organs and organ systems. Factors considered will be organ development and structure, evolutionary processes and biological diversity, and their effects on physiological mechanisms regulating the internal environment. Corequisite: BIOL 2112. (3-0) S
BIOL 2V00 Topics in Biological Sciences (1-6 semester hours) May be repeated as topics vary (6 hours maximum). ([1-6]-0) R
BIOL 2V01 Topics in Biological Sciences with Lab (1-6 semester hours) May be repeated as topics vary (6 hours maximum). ([1-5]-[1-5]) R
BIOL 2V95 Individual Instruction in Biology (1-6 semester hours) Individual study under a faculty member's direction. Topics may vary. May be repeated for credit. Consent of instructor required. ([1-6]-0) S
BIOL 3101 Classic and Molecular Genetics Workshop (1 semester hour) Problem solving and discussion related to the subject matter in BIOL 3301. Prerequisites: BIOL 2281, BIOL 2311, and BIOL 2312 or their equivalents. Corequisite: BIOL 3301. (1-0) S
BIOL 3102 Eukaryotic Molecular and Cell Biology Workshop (1 semester hour) Problem solving and discussion related to the subject matter in BIOL 3302. Prerequisites: BIOL 2281, BIOL 2311, and BIOL 2312 or their equivalents. Corequisite: BIOL 3302. (1-0) S
BIOL 3161 Biochemistry Workshop I (1 semester hour) Problem solving methodology in biochemistry; discussion of recent advances in areas related to the subject matter in BIOL/CHEM 3361. Prerequisites: BIOL 2281, BIOL 2311, and BIOL 2312 or their equivalents. Corequisite: BIOL/CHEM 3361. (1-0) S
BIOL 3162 Biochemistry Workshop II (1 semester hour) Problem-solving methodology in biochemistry; discussion of recent advances in areas related to the subject matter in BIOL 3362. Prerequisites: BIOL 2281, BIOL 2311, and BIOL 2312 or their equivalents. Corequisite: BIOL/CHEM 3362. (1-0) Y
BIOL 3301 Classical and Molecular Genetics (3 semester hours) The phenomenon of heredity, its cytological and molecular basis; gene expression and transfer of genetic information, with major focus on bacterial and model eukaryotic systems; genetic recombination and chromosome mapping; tetrad analysis; mutations and mutagenesis; genetic interactions; application of recombinant DNA techniques to genetic analysis. Prerequisites: BIOL 2311 and CHEM 2323 (Organic Chemistry I). Corequisite: BIOL 3101. (3-0) S
BIOL 3302 Eukaryotic Molecular and Cell Biology (3 semester hour) Structural organization of eukaryotic cells; regulation of cellular activities; membranes and transport; cellular replication; examples of cell specialization such as blood (immunoglobulins) and muscle cells. Prerequisites: BIOL 3301 and BIOL/CHEM 3361. Corequisite: BIOL 3102. (3-0) S
BIOL 3305 Evolutionary Analysis (3 semester hours) Molecular and fossil evidence for evolution, Darwinian natural selection, mechanisms of evolution, Mendelian genetics in populations, forms of adaptation, evolutionary trees, molecular phylogeny, theories on the origin of life. Prerequisite: BIOL 3301. (3-0) Y
BIOL 3318 Forensic Biology (3 semester hours) Role and methodology of biological testing in criminal investigation and forensic science. Analysis of the procedures and methodologies employed in the collection, preservation and screening of biological evidence, and protein and DNA testing. Population genetics employed during the statistical evaluation of data is covered. The course is structured to allow individuals with and without biological training to participate. The subject matter will be developed from the concept of "What is DNA?" through "What does a statistical estimate really mean?" No prerequisites. (3-0) T
BIOL 3321 Microbial Genetics Laboratory (3 semester hours) Laboratory with introductory lecture that will focus on the genetic methods used for analysis of complex biological processes in bacteria. Includes the utilization of chemical and physical mutagens; transformation; transduction; conjugation; transposons; gene fusions; molecular cloning; polymerase chain reaction; southern, northern and western blot analyses; and post-genomic genetics. The course will also emphasize how these sophisticated techniques can be used to dissect pathogenic mechanisms and enhance environmental remediation. Prerequisites: BIOL 2281, 2311, and BIOL 2312 or their equivalents. (1-2) T
BIOL 3335 Microbial Physiology (3 semester hours) Life processes of microbes: fermentations, N2 assimilation, and other biochemical pathways specific to bacteria; cellular structure and differentiation, among others. Substitutes for BIOL/CHEM 3362 for Biology majors. Prerequisites: BIOL 2311 and BIOL/CHEM 3361. (3-0) T
BIOL 3336 Protein and Nucleic Acid Structure (3 semester hours) Examines the different types of protein motifs, protein and DNA folding and stability, and the relation of structure to function. Circular dichroism, NMR, and crystallographic methods of structural determination are presented. Types of proteins considered include transcription factors, proteinases, membrane proteins, proteins in signal transduction, proteins of the immune system, and engineered proteins. Students also receive instruction in the viewing and manipulation of protein and DNA structures using various modeling programs and data from national web sites. Prerequisite: BIOL/CHEM 3361. (3-0) T
BIOL 3350 Biological Basis of Health and Disease (3 semester hours) Fundamentals of pathophysiology, focusing on the dynamic processes that cause disease, give rise to symptoms, and signal the body’s attempt to overcome disease. The course covers diseases which may affect dramatically the life of an individual and society in the modern age. Topics include 1) mechanisms of infectious disease, immunity, and inflammation and 2) alterations in structure and function of the reproductive, circulatory, respiratory, and urinary systems. Special emphasis is given to preventative aspects for each disease based on non-drug, wellness-promoting approaches. This course is designed as a science elective open to all majors. No prerequisites. (3-0) S
BIOL 3351 Secrets of Cells (3 semester hours) Explores the biology of cells, from bacterial to human. Topics include the basic structure of cells, structure and inheritance of DNA, evolution of eukaryotic cells, functioning of different types of cells and tissues, including those of the immune and nervous system, and the study of several genetic diseases, such as cancer and cardiovascular disease. This course is specifically designed as a science elective open to all majors. No prerequisites. (3-0) T
BIOL 3361 Biochemistry I (3 semester hours) Structures and chemical properties of amino acids; protein purification and characterization; protein structure and thermodynamics of polypeptide chain folding; catalytic mechanisms, kinetics and regulation of enzymes; energetics of biochemical reactions; generation and storage of metabolic energy associated with carbohydrates; oxidative phosphorylation and electron transport mechanisms; photosynthesis. Prerequisites: CHEM 2323 and 2325 (Organic Chemistry I and II). Corequisite: BIOL 3161. (Same as CHEM 3361) (3-0) S
BIOL 3362 Biochemistry II (3 semester hours) Breakdown and synthesis of lipids; membrane structure and function; nitrogen metabolism and fixation; nucleotide metabolism; structure and properties of nucleic acids; sequencing and genetic engineering; replication, transcription, and translation; chromosome structure; hormone action; biochemical basis of certain pathological processes. Prerequisite: BIOL/CHEM 3361 or its equivalent, or consent of instructor. Co-requisite: BIOL 3162. (Same as CHEM 3362) (3-0) Y
BIOL 3370 Exercise Physiology (3 semester hours) Examines the operation and adaptation of human organ systems (cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, skeletal, and hormonal) during exercise. Clinical aspects of exercise, including the effects of training, nutrition, performance, and ergogenic aids, are also discussed. Prerequisite: BIOL 2312. Recommended: BIOL 3455 and 3456. (3-0) Y
BIOL 3371 Biology of the Brain (3 semester hours) Explores the structure and function of the brain. Includes discussions of the molecular and cell biology of neurons, organization of the nervous system and anatomy of the brain, basic electrophysiology of the neuron, function and action of neurotransmitters, operation of sensory and motor systems, and the molecular and cellular basis of neurodegenerative disorders. Prerequisites: BIOL 2281, BIOL 2311, and BIOL 2312 or their equivalents. (3-0) T
BIOL 3380 Biochemistry Laboratory (3 semester hours) Current techniques in the purification and characterization of enzymes to demonstrate fundamental principles that are utilized in modern biochemistry and molecular biology research laboratories. Practical skills taught include micropipetting, basic solution preparation, conducting pH measurements, isolating crude enzyme extracts, and performing standard activity assays. Advanced experiments with Green Fluorescent Protein and Lactate Dehydrogenase include Ni++-NTA affinity chromatography, ion chromatography, protein detection using Bradford, Lowry, and spectrophotometric assays, SDS-PAGE separation, Western Blot analysis, and enzyme kinetics. Prerequisite: BIOL 2281. Pre- or co-requisite: BIOL/CHEM 3361. (1-2) S
BIOL 3455 Human Anatomy and Physiology with Lab I (4 semester hours) First of a two-course sequence providing a comprehensive study of the basic principles of human physiology in conjunction with a detailed, model-based human anatomy laboratory and computer-assisted physiology experiments. Examination of structure-function relationships includes a survey of human histology and skeletal, muscular, neural, and sensory organ systems. Prerequisite: BIOL 2312 or equivalent. (3-3) S
BIOL 3456 Human Anatomy and Physiology with Lab II (4 semester hours) Continuation of the comprehensive study of the basic principles of human physiology in conjunction with a detailed, model-based human anatomy laboratory and computer-assisted physiology experiments. Endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, renal, and reproductive systems are examined. May be taken before BIOL 3455. Prerequisite: BIOL 2312 or equivalent. (3-3) S
BIOL 3V00 Topics in Biological Sciences (1-6 semester hours) May be repeated as topics vary (9 hours maximum). Prerequisites: BIOL 2281, BIOL 2311, and BIOL 2312 or their equivalents. ([1-6]-0) S
BIOL 3V01 Topics in Biological Sciences with Lab (1-6 semester hours) May be repeated as topics vary (6 hours maximum). Prerequisites: BIOL 2281, BIOL 2311, and BIOL 2312 or their equivalents. ([1-5]-[1-5]) R
BIOL 3V20 General Microbiology with Lab (4-5 semester hours) Majors course in general microbiology. Lectures include topics recommended by the Education Division of the American Society for Microbiology: microbial structure, diversity, growth and growth control, metabolism, genetics, and gene regulation. Among additional topics covered are virology, immunology and microbial diseases (plant and animal) including epidemiology, transmission, and host-microbe interactions. The laboratory focuses on developing laboratory skills in classical microbiology by the individual student. Exercises include various staining and pure culture techniques, biochemical and other in vitro testing, as well as isolation and identification of unknown organisms. Prerequisites: BIOL 2281, BIOL 2311, and BIOL 2312 or their equivalents and CHEM 2323. (2-[2-3]) Y
BIOL 3V40 Topics in Molecular and Cell Biology (1-6 semester hours) May be repeated as topics vary (9 hours maximum). Prerequisites: BIOL 2281, BIOL 2311, and BIOL 2312 or their equivalents. ([1-6]-[0-5]) S
BIOL 3V90 Undergraduate Readings in Biology (1-3 semester hours) Subject and scope to be determined on an individual basis. Topics may vary. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and the Biology Department office. ([1-3]-0) S
BIOL 3V91 Undergraduate Research in Biology (1-3 semester hours) Subject and scope to be determined on an individual basis. Topics may vary. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. ([1-3]-0) S
BIOL 3V92 Undergraduate Readings in Biochemistry (1-3 semester hours) Subject and scope to be determined on an individual basis. Topics may vary. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. ([1-3]-0) S
BIOL 3V93 Undergraduate Research in Biochemistry (1-3 semester hours) Subject and scope to be determined on an individual basis. Topics may vary. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. (Same as CHEM 3V92) ([1-3]-0) S
BIOL 3V94 Topics in Biology (Individual Instruction) (1-6 semester hours) Individual study under a faculty member's direction. Topics may vary. May be repeated for credit. Consent of instructor required. ([1-6]-0) S
BIOL 3V95 Undergraduate Readings in Molecular and Cell Biology (1-3 semester hours) Subject and scope to be determined on an individual basis. Topics may vary. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. ([1-3]-0) S
BIOL 3V96 Undergraduate Research in Molecular and Cell Biology (1-3 semester hours) Subject and scope to be determined on an individual basis. Topics may vary. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. ([1-3]-0) S
BIOL 4261 Biomolecular Modeling (2 semester hours) Designed to provide some of the computational tools needed to study the large number of biomolecular structures now available in databanks. Molecular Simulations Insight II software will be used to visualize and manipulate protein and nucleic acid structures. Students will build examples of small 3-dimensional molecules from amino acid, nucleotide, and sugar residues. Procedures for energy minimization will be studied. Homologous protein structures will be compared, and mutated structures will be modeled. Other modeling approaches such as Monte Carlo and molecular or Brownian dynamics may be included. Prerequisites: BIOL 3301, BIOL 3302, and BIOL/CHEM 3361 or their equivalents, or the written consent of the instructor. (1-1) T
BIOL 4302 TA Apprenticeship (3 semester hours) Development and practice of teaching skills in the classroom and laboratory in the biological sciences. May be repeated only once for credit (6 hours maximum). Prerequisites: BIOL 3301, BIOL 3302, and BIOL/CHEM 3361 or their equivalents, or the written consent of the instructor. (3-0) S
BIOL 4308 Developmental Biology (3 semester hours) Molecular mechanisms controlling development in eukaryotes, with emphasis on the early stages of morphogenesis. Prerequisites: BIOL 3301, BIOL 3302, and BIOL/CHEM 3361 or their equivalents, or the written consent of the instructor. (3-0) T
BIOL 4316 Parasites and Symbionts (3 semester hours) A survey of microorganisms that live in close association with other organisms. From bacteriophages to trypanosomes, this course will cover a wide range of plant and animal parasites and symbionts and their interactions at the molecular level. Prerequisites: BIOL 3301, BIOL 3302, and BIOL/CHEM 3361 or their equivalents, or the written consent of the instructor. (3-0) T
BIOL 4332 RNA Structure and Catalysis (3 semester hours) A survey of the determinants of RNA secondary and tertiary structure and their role in RNA processing and catalysis. The mechanisms of posttranscriptional RNA processing including base modifications, mRNA capping and poly A addition, 5' and 3' end maturation, intron excision, and RNA editing will be covered as well as the mechanisms of RNA catalysis. The mechanisms of large ribozymes such as Group I and Group II introns and RNAase of P RNA will be contrasted to the mechanisms of small ribozymes such as hairpins and hammerheads. Prerequisites: BIOL 3301, BIOL 3302, and BIOL/CHEM 3361 or their equivalents, or the written consent of the instructor. (3-0) T
BIOL 4333 Replication, Recombination, and Repair (3 semester hours) A fundamental unifying principle of molecular biology, genetics, molecular medicine, and evolution is DNA metabolism. This course will provide an extensive overview of the mechanisms that control the processes of DNA repair, replication, and recombination. The most recent publications in these fields will be discussed in order to provide the students with a strong working knowledge of these processes. The course structure will consist of a mixture of faculty lectures and student literature presentations. Student evaluations will be based upon examinations, class participation, and the written and oral presentations. (3-0) T
BIOL 4336 Membrane Biology (3 semester hours) A survey of the structural components of biomembranes and the forces that dictate membrane structure. General membrane functions, such as compartmentalization and membrane transport, are analyzed in view of the principles of membrane structure. The structure, function, and biogenesis of the membrane organelles in cells are covered in detail. Diseases whose pathology originates with biomembranes, such as cystic fibrosis and heart disease, are discussed as examples illustrating membrane structure and function. Prerequisites: BIOL 3301, BIOL 3302, and BIOL/CHEM 3361 and BIOL/CHEM 3362 or their equivalents, or the written consent of the instructor. (3-0) T
BIOL 4337 Seminal Papers in Biology (3 semester hours) Theoretical and experimental papers in selected areas of biology will be discussed in a senior seminar format. The historical and biographical context of the papers and their authors will also be explored. The areas to be covered in any semester will vary with the instructor. Each student is expected to make an oral presentation and to prepare a written paper. Satisfies the Advanced Writing Requirement for Biology majors. Prerequisites: BIOL 3301, BIOL 3302, BIOL/CHEM 3361 and BIOL/CHEM 3362; Consent of instructor. (3-0) S
BIOL 4338 Cell Signaling (3 semester hours) How cells sense, interpret, and respond to various intra- and extracellular signals. Focus will be placed on signal transduction pathways controlling growth, development, and diseases. The course will consist of lectures and in-class discussion of research articles. Prerequisites: BIOL 3301, BIOL 3302, and BIOL/CHEM 3361 or their equivalents, or the written consent of the instructor. (3-0) T
BIOL 4340 Proteomics (3 semester hours) Covers the modern techniques for analyzing the protein complement of cells, to understand cell development and physiology in healthy and diseased states. Topics include protein isolation techniques; IEF-SDS PAGE; protein structure determination by X-ray crystallography and NMR; techniques for identification of protein interactions; the use of mass spectrometry to quantitate, sequence, and identify post-translational modifications of proteins; the development of protein chips and how they can be used for protein identification and quantitation. Prerequisite: BIOL/CHEM 3361. (3-0) T
BIOL 4341 Genomics (3 semester hours) Fundamentals of how the human genome sequence was acquired and the impact of the human genome era on biomedical research, medical care and genetic testing. Also covered is the impact new tools such as DNA microarray, realtime PCR, mass spectrometry and bioinformatics will have on approahces to how scientific questions are investigated. The class will be a mixture of didactic lectures and paper presentations on examples of applied genomics. There will be two computer-based labs where students will perform online bioinformatics and data mining using the NCBI public database. Prerequisite: BIOL 3301 with a grade of C or better. (3-0) T
BIOL 4342 Regulation of Gene Expression (3 semester hours) How genetic information is regulated in prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems. Topics include mechanisms of transcription, promoter architecture, function and regulation of transcription factors, organization of chromosomes, pathways that control gene expression during growth and development, genome organization and whole-genome expression analysis, and related areas. The course emphazises presentation and critical discussion of techniques and results from the recent scientific literature. Prerequisites: BIOL 3301, BIOL 3302, and BIOL/CHEM 3361 or their equivalents, or the written consent of the instructor. (3-0) T
BIOL 4345 Immunobiology (3 semester hours) Interactions of antigens and antibodies. Fine structure of antibodies. Tissues and cells of the immune system. Response of B and T lymphocytes to antigens. Cellular interactions in humoral and cell-mediated immunity. Genetic basis of antibody diversity. Immunity and infectious diseases. Prerequisites: CHEM 2323 and CHEM 2325 (Organic Chemistry I and II). Suggested additional preparation: BIOL 3302. (3-0) T
BIOL 4350 Medical Microbiology (3 semester hours) This course will cover the methods used for identification of pathogenic organisms and the study of these organisms in relation to their disease process in humans. We will also cover at the molecular level important concepts such as microbial virulence, the control of bacterial growth, and host responses to infection. Prerequisite: BIOL 3301 or BIOL 3420. (3-0) T
BIOL 4352 Medical Molecular and Cell Biology (3 semester hours) Topics related to health and disease will be examined from a molecular and cellular perspective. Topics will vary but will be selected from new and developing applications of cell biology to cancer, heart disease, fat metabolism, mitochondrial disorders, aging, Alzheimer's, etc. Students are expected to participate actively in discussions and make an oral presentation. Prerequisite: BIOL 3302. (3-0) T
BIOL 4353 Molecular Biology of HIV/AIDS (3 semester hours) Topics include a discussion of the history and epidemiology of AIDS, the likely origins of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and the molecular and cell biology of HIV replication. The cell biological basis of the immunodeficiency induced by HIV infection is examined, as well as that of common accompanying pathologies such as Kaposi's sarcoma. The molecular basis of a variety of existing and potential anti-viral therapies is considered. Suggested prerequisite: BIOL 3302. (3-0) T
BIOL 4355 Molecular Biology of Neurological and Hematological Diseases (3 semester hours) Neurological and hematological diseases affect millions of Americans each year, often fatally. The course will bring students up to date on current knowledge of the molecular biology of neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Amyotropic lateral sclerosis and Huntington's disease. Hematological diseases such as hemolytic anemias including sickle cell disease and thalassemia, platelet disorders and clinical case studies will be covered, along with efforts towards gene therapy. The course comprises lectures, student presentations, and presentations by world experts in the field. Prerequisites: BIOL 3301, BIOL 3302, and BIOL/CHEM 3361 or their equivalents, or the written consent of the instructor. (3-0) T
BIOL 4365 Advanced Human Physiology (3 semester hours) Function and integration of human organ systems. The role of these systems in the adaptation of humans to, and their interaction with, the environment. Maintenance and perturbation of homeostasis. Pathophysiological basis of certain diseases. Prerequisite: BIOL 3302 or consent of instructor. (3-0) T
BIOL 4366 Molecular Biology of Cancer (3 semester hours) Subject matter includes a discussion of representative examples of the principal categories of dominantly acting oncogenes. The role in oncogenesis of tumor suppressor genes ("recessive oncogenes") is also considered, as are anti-apoptotic oncogenes such as Bcl. The roles that the proteins encoded by these genes play in growth hormone signal transduction, gene regulation, cell cycle regulation, and programmed cell death will be examined. Students will also read and discuss the primary literature in this field. Prerequisite: BIOL 3302. (3-0) T
BIOL 4370 Developmental Neurobiology (3 semester hours) Examines some of the remarkable progress made in recent years towards understanding how the nervous system develops. Among topics covered are signals regulating formation of neural tissue, patterning of the brain, differentiation and migration of neurons, formation of neural connections, neuronal survival, and elimination of superfluous cells. Course is designed to be interactive and will include lectures, student presentations, and discussion of important discoveries in the area. Prerequisites: BIOL 2311 and BIOL 3301. (3-0) T
BIOL 4375 Bioinformatics (3 semester hours) A practical approach to quantitative and statistical analysis of biological sequence and structural information. Classroom lectures are accompanied by practical demonstrations and computer lab exercises. Topics include genomic information content, data searches and sequence alignment, mutations and distance-based phylogenetic analysis, genomics and gene recognition, polymorphisms and forensic applications, nucleic-acid and protein array analysis, and structure prediction of biological macromolecules. Pre-requisites: BIOL 3301, BIOL 3361 and two semesters of calculus. Suggested additional preparation: one semester introductory statistics. (3-0) T
BIOL 4380 Cell and Molecular Biology Laboratory (3 semester hours) Current techniques that are utilized in a modern Molecular Biology research laboratory. Practical skills taught include monitoring bacterial growth, phenotype testing, plasmid isolation, restriction digest analysis, DNA cloning, and DNA fingerprinting using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Advanced techniques include fundamental microscopy, DNA transfection and general characterization of animal cell cultures, sub-cellular fractionation using differential centrifugation, basic immunological techniques, and chemical mutagen testing. Prerequisite: BIOL 3380. Pre- or co-requisite: BIOL 3302. (1-2) S
BIOL 4382 Advanced Molecular Biology Laboratory (3 semester hours) Advanced techniques for the study of biological systems: spectroscopy, ultracentrifugation, radioactive labeling, and construction and screening of cDNA expression libraries. Prerequisites: BIOL 3301, BIOL 3302, and BIOL/CHEM 3361 or their equivalents, or the written consent of the instructor. (1-2) Y
BIOL 4390 Senior Readings and Advanced Writing (3 semester hours) For students conducting independent literature research and scientific writing in Biology or Molecular and Cell Biology. Subject and scope to be determined on an individual basis. Satisfies the Advanced Writing Requirement for Biology and Molecular Biology majors. Topics may vary. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. (3-0) S
BIOL 4391 Senior Research and Advanced Writing (3 semester hours) For students conducting laboratory research and scientific writing in Biology or Molecular and Cell Biology. Subject and scope to be determined on an individual basis. Satisfies the Advanced Writing Requirement for Biology and Molecular Biology majors. Topics may vary. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. (3-0) S
BIOL 4398 Senior Honors Readings and Thesis (3 semester hours) For students conducting independent literature research for honors in Biology or Molecular and Cell Biology. Besides the university specifications the student should contact the undergraduate advisor in biology for program requirements. Satisfies the Advanced Writing Requirement for Biology and Molecular Biology majors. Topics may vary. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. (3-0) S
BIOL 4399 Senior Honors Research and Thesis (3 semester hours) For students conducting independent research for honors in Biology or Molecular and Cell Biology. Besides the university specifications the student should contact the undergraduate advisor in biology for program requirements. Satisfies the Advanced Writing Requirement for Biology and Molecular Biology majors. Topics may vary. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. (3-0) S
BIOL 4461 Biophysical Chemistry (4 semester hours) For students interested in the interface between biochemistry and structural biology. Provides an advanced treatment of the physical principles underlying modern molecular biology techniques. Topics include classical and statistical thermodynamics, biochemical kinetics, transport processes (e.g., diffusion, sedimentation, viscosity), chemical bonding, and spectroscopy. Prerequisites: MATH 2417 and 2419; PHYS 2325 and 2326, PHYS 3341 and 3342, or equivalent; BIOL/CHEM 3361. (Same as CHEM 4461) (4-0) Y
BIOL 4V00 Special Topics in Biology (1-6 semester hours) May be repeated as topics vary (9 hours maximum). Prerequisites: BIOL 3301, BIOL 3302, and BIOL/CHEM 3361 or their equivalents, or the written consent of the instructor. ([1-6]-0) S
BIOL 4V01 Topics in Biological Sciences with Lab (1-6 semester hours) May be repeated as topics vary (6 hours maximum). Prerequisites: BIOL 3301, BIOL 3302, and BIOL/CHEM 3361 or their equivalents, or the written consent of the instructor. ([1-5]-[1-5]) R
BIOL 4V04 Biology Seminar (1-6 semester hours) May be repeated as seminar topics vary (6 hours maximum). Prerequisites: BIOL 3301, BIOL 3302, and BIOL/CHEM 3361 or their equivalents, or the written consent of the instructor. ([1-6]-0) R
BIOL 4V40 Special Topics in Molecular and Cell Biology (1-6 semester hours) May be repeated as topics vary (9 hours maximum). Prerequisites: BIOL 3301, BIOL 3302, and BIOL/CHEM 3361 or their equivalents, or the written consent of the instructor. ([1-6]-[0-5]) S
BIOL 4V51 Techniques in Medical Microbiology (1-3 semester hours) This course will teach students to become proficient in laboratory techniques used in both basic and medical microbiology. The initial portion of the course will cover basic techniques such as safe handling of microorganisms, media preparation, pure culture techniques, and staining of microorganisms. The majority of the course will involve the theory and use of physical and biochemical methods to examine microbial physiology, and the use of these methods in organism identification. Microorganisms to be studied include bacterial (and their viruses), fungi, and protozoa. Students will demonstrate proficiency by identifying unknown organisms in pure and mixed cultures, and by the ability to distinguish potential pathogens from resident and normal flora in various clinical specimens. Prerequisite: BIOL 3301 or BIOL 3V20. (0-[2-6]) T
BIOL 4V95 Advanced Topics in Biology (Individual Instruction) (1-6 semester hours) Individual study under a faculty member's direction. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Consent of instructor required. ([1-6]-0) S
BIOL 4V99 Senior Honors Research in Biology (3-6 semester hours) For students conducting independent research for honors theses or projects. Besides the university specifications, the student should contact the undergraduate advisor in biology for program requirements. Topics may vary. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. ([3-6]-0) S

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PHYS
PSY
RHET
SE
SOC
SOCS
SPAU
STAT
TE

     

This catalog is a general information publication only. It is not intended to nor does it contain all regulations that relate to students. The provisions of this catalog do not constitute a contract, express or implied, between any applicant, student or faculty member and The University of Texas at Dallas or The University of Texas System. The University of Texas at Dallas reserves the right to withdraw courses at any time, to change fees or tuition, calendar, curriculum, degree requirements, graduation procedures, and any other requirements affecting students. Changes will become effective whenever the proper authorities so determine and will apply to both prospective students and those already enrolled.

Statement on Equal Educational Opportunity
The University of Texas at Dallas is committed to an educational and working environment that provides equal opportunity to all members of the University community. In accordance with federal and state law, the University prohibits unlawful discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, gender, age, disability, and veteran status. Discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation is also prohibited pursuant to University policy.