2006-2008 Undergraduate Catalog (2007 Supplement)
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Chemistry Course Descriptions

CHEM 1011 General Chemistry I Recitation (0 semester hours) Introduces concepts and demonstrates techniques that will be covered in CHEM 1111 laboratory. Corequisites: CHEM 1013, CHEM 1111 and CHEM 1311. (0-0) S
CHEM 1012 General Chemistry II Recitation (0 semester hours) Introduces concepts and demonstrates techniques that will be covered in CHEM 1112 laboratory. Corequisites: CHEM 1014, CHEM 1112 and CHEM 1312. (0-0) S
CHEM 1013 General Chemistry I Exams (0 semester hours) Hour exams for CHEM 1311. Corequisites: CHEM 1011, CHEM 1111 and CHEM 1311. (0-0) S
CHEM 1014 General Chemistry II Exams (0 semester hours) Hour exams for CHEM 1312. Corequisites: CHEM 1012, CHEM 1112 and CHEM 1312. (0-0) S

CHEM 1111 (CHEM 1111) General Chemistry Laboratory I
(1 semester hour) Introduction to the chemistry laboratory. Experiments are designed to demonstrate concepts covered in CHEM 1311; including properties and reactions of inorganic substances and elementary qualitative and quantitative analysis. Corequisites: CHEM 1011, CHEM 1013 and CHEM 1311. (0 3) S
CHEM 1112 (CHEM 1112) General Chemistry Laboratory II (1 semester hour) A continuation of CHEM 1111 demonstrating the concepts covered in CHEM 1312, including acid base chemistry, reaction kinetics, electrochemistry, polymers, and organic synthesis. Prerequisite: CHEM 1111 or 1115. Corequisites: CHEM 1012, CHEM 1014 and CHEM 1312. (0 3) S
CHEM 1115 Honors Freshman Chemistry Laboratory I (1 semester hour) This course and its follow-on (CHEM 1116) reinforce the concepts of Freshman Chemistry via experiments. Students are offered the opportunity to acquire basic laboratory skills and an appreciation for the presence of chemistry in daily living through a combination of laboratory and computer experiments and applied research modules. Corequisite: CHEM 1315. (0 6) Y
CHEM 1116 Honors Freshman Chemistry Laboratory II (1 semester hour) A continuation of CHEM 1115. This course reinforces concepts presented in CHEM 1316. Prerequisite: CHEM 1115. Corequisite: CHEM 1316. (0 6) Y
CHEM 1311 (CHEM 1311) General Chemistry I (3 semester hours) Introduction to elementary concepts of chemistry theory. The course emphasizes chemical reactions, the mole concept and its applications, and molecular structure and bonding. Corequisites: CHEM 1011, CHEM 1013 and CHEM 1111. (3-0) S
CHEM 1312 (CHEM 1312) General Chemistry II (3 semester hours) A continuation of CHEM 1311 treating metals; solids, liquids, and intermolecular forces; chemical equilibrium; electrochemistry; organic chemistry; rates of reactions; and environmental, polymer, nuclear, and biochemistry. Prerequisite: CHEM 1311 or 1315. Corequisites: CHEM 1012, CHEM 1014 and CHEM 1112. (3-0) S
CHEM 1315 Honors Freshman Chemistry I (3 semester hours) An advanced course dealing with the principles of structure and bonding and the physical laws that govern the interactions of molecules. The course is intended for students who have a solid background in chemistry at the secondary level and the desire to explore general chemistry concepts more deeply. Corequisite: CHEM 1115. (3-0) Y
CHEM 1316 Honors Freshman Chemistry II (3 semester hours) A continuation of the presentation of concepts begun in CHEM 1315. This course will present advanced topics including those in organic, biochemistry, and environmental chemistry. Prerequisite: CHEM 1315 or consent of instructor. Corequisite: CHEM 1116. (3-0) Y
CHEM 2023 Introductory Organic Chemistry Laboratory I Recitation (0 semester hour) Introduces concepts and demonstrates techniques that will be covered in CHEM 2123 laboratory. Corerequisite: CHEM 2123 and CHEM 2323. (0-0) S
CHEM 2025 Introductory Organic Chemistry Laboratory Recitation (0 semester hours) Introduces concepts and demonstrates techniques that will be covered in CHEM 2125 laboratory. Corequisite: CHEM 2125 and CHEM 2325. (0-0) S
CHEM 2123 (CHEM 2123) Introductory Organic Chemistry Laboratory I (1 semester hour) The experimental skills associated with organic functional group reactions. Corequisites: CHEM 2023 and CHEM 2323 (may be taken concurrently). (0-4) S
CHEM 2125 (CHEM 2125) Introductory Organic Chemistry Laboratory II (1 semester hours) Continuation of Organic Chemistry Laboratory I. Prerequisites: CHEM 2323 and 2123. Corequisites: CHEM 2025 and CHEM 2325. (0-4) S
CHEM 2323 (CHEM 2323) Introductory Organic Chemistry I (3 semester hours) The covalent bond. Organic chemistry: aliphatic and aromatic compounds; covalent inorganic and organometallic compounds; a survey of the organic functional groups and their typical reactions; stereochemistry. The first course in organic chemistry. Satisfies the basic organic chemistry lecture requirements for pre health profession students. Prerequisite: CHEM 1312 or 1316. Corequisites: CHEM 2023 and CHEM 2123. (3-0) S
CHEM 2325 (CHEM 2325) Introductory Organic Chemistry II (3 semester hours) Continuation of CHEM 2323. Methods of structure determination. Synthesis, degradation, spectroscopy. Naturally occurring compounds: carbohydrates, amino acids and proteins, lipids, alkaloids. Prerequisite: CHEM 2323. Corequisites: CHEM 2025 and CHEM 2125. (3-0) S
CHEM 2401 (CHEM 2401) Introductory Quantitative Methods in Chemistry (4 semester hours) A study of the theory, applications, and calculations involved in the methods of analysis. Theory and practice of volumetric, gravimetric, and spectrophotometric methods. Prerequisites: CHEM 1312 and 1112. (2-6) Y
CHEM 2V01 Topics in Chemistry (1 3 semester hours) Subject matter will vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (9 hours maximum). Prerequisite: Consent of instructor ([1-3]-0) R
CHEM 2V95 Individual Instruction in Chemistry (1 3 semester hours) Individual study under a faculty member’s direction. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (9 hours maximum). Consent of instructor required. ([1-3]-0) R
CHEM 3321 Physical Chemistry I (3 semester hours) Fundamental properties of macroscopic biophysical chemical systems are introduced and described in quantitative terms. A core of topics in thermodynamis, molecular motion, kinetics, molecular distribution and statistical thermodynamics is supplemented with topics germane to students taking physical chemistry with biophysical applications. Prerequisites: CHEM 2325 and MATH 2451, or consent of intructor (CHEM 3361 is recommended). (3-0) Y
CHEM 3322 Physical Chemistry II (3 semester hours) Fundamental microscopic properties of matter and radiation are discussed. A core of topics including quantum chemistry, atomic and molecular structure and spectroscopy, non-bonded interactions, and computational chemistry is supplemented with topics germane to students taking physical chemistry with biophysical applications. Prerequisites: CHEM 3321 and MATH 2451, or consent of instructor. (3-0) Y
CHEM 3341 Inorganic Chemistry I (3 semester hours) Survey of inorganic chemistry with emphasis on the modern concepts and theories of inorganic chemistry including electronic and geometric structure of inorganic compounds. Topics address contemporary physical and descriptive inorganic chemistry. (3-0) Y
CHEM 3361 Biochemistry I (3 semester hours) Structures and chemical properties of amino acids; protein purification and characterization; protein structure and thermodynamics of polypeptide chain folding; catalytic mechanisms, kinetics, and regulation of enzymes; energetics of biochemical reactions; carbohydrate structure and metabolism; the citric acid cycle, electron transport mechanisms and oxidative phosphorylation. Prerequisites: CHEM 2323 and 2325, or equivalent. (Same as BIOL 3361) (3-0) Y
CHEM 3362 Biochemistry II (3 semester hours) Membrane structure and function; glycogen metabolism, gluconeogenesis, and pentose pathway; lipid structure and metabolism; amino acid metabolism; photosynthesis; nucleic acid structure and metabolism; sequencing and genetic engineering; replication, transcription, and translation; chromosome structure. Prerequisite: BIOL/CHEM 3361, or consent of instructor. (Same as BIOL 3362) (3-0) Y
CHEM 3471 Advanced Chemical Synthesis Laboratory (4 semester hours) Careful handling practices and controlled variation of reaction parameters to obtain high yield syntheses. Use of standard separation techniques and spectrophotometric methods to identify reaction products and assess their purity. Prerequisite: CHEM 2125 and CHEM 3472 or consent of instructor. (1-7) Y
CHEM 3472 Instrumental Analysis (4 semester hours) Basic processes, instrumentation and applications of ultraviolet, visible, fluorescence, atomic and mass spectroscopy, electrochemistry, surface and microanalysis, and separations. Emphasis will be placed upon acquisition, treatment, and interpretation of data and report writing. Prerequisite: CHEM 2401. (2-6) Y
CHEM 3V92 Undergraduate Research in Biochemistry (2 6 semester hours) Students will pursue an independent project under the supervision of a member of the Chemistry, Biology or U. T. Southwestern faculty. May be repeated for credit (9 hours maximum). Prerequisites: Consent of supervising faculty and filing a research plan approved by supervising faculty and the Undergraduate Advisor in Biochemistry prior to the 12th class dayinstructor. This course satisfies the university advanced writing requirement. (Same as BIOL 3V92) ([2-6]-0) S
CHEM 4335 Polymer Chemistry (3 semester hours) Macromolecules. Synthesis, structure, and properties of polymers. Polymer polymer and polymer solvent interactions. Applications in industry and biochemistry. Prerequisite: CHEM 3321 or consent of instructor (CHEM 3322 recommended). (3-0) Y
CHEM 4355 Computational Modeling (3 semester hours) This course will introduce students to computational modeling approaches commonly used to tackle chemical and biophysical problems. The students will learn, through lectures and projects, that the appropriate modeling tool depends on the time and length scales of the problem under study. Prerequisites: CHEM 3321 and MATH 2451, or consent of instructor. (3-0) Y
CHEM 4381 Environmental Chemistry (3 semester hours) This course encompasses the study of the sources, reactions, transport, effects, and fates of chemical species in water, soil, and air environments and the effects of technology thereon. Prerequisite: CHEM 2325 or consent of instructor. (3-0) T
CHEM 4461 Biophysical Chemistry (4 semester hours) For students interested in the interface between biochemistry and structural biology. Provides an advanced treatment of the physical principles underlying modern molecular biology techniques. Topics include classical and statistical thermodynamics, biochemical kinetics, transport processes (e.g. diffusion, sedimentation, viscosity), chemical bonding, and spectroscopy. Prerequisites: MATH 2417 and 2419; PHYS 2325 and 2326 or equivalent; BIOL/CHEM 3361, CHEM 3312, or consent of instructor. (Same as BIOL 4461) (4-0) Y
CHEM 4390 Research and Advanced Writing in Chemistry (3 semester hours) For students conducting independent research and scientific writing. Students will pursue an independent project under the supervision of a member of the Chemistry faculty. Subject and scope to be determined on an individual basis. This course satisfies the university advanced writing requirement. Prerequisites: Senior in chemistry, consent of supervising faculty and filing a research plan approved by supervising faculty and the Undergraduate Committee in Chemistry prior to the 12th class day. (3-0) S
CHEM 4399 Research and Advanced Writing in Chemistry for Honors Students (3 semester hours) For students conducting independent research for honors theses or projects. Satisfies the university advanced writing requirement. Prerequisites: Senior in chemistry, consent of supervising faculty and filing a research plan approved by supervising faculty and the Undergraduate Committee in Chemistry prior to the 12th class day. (3-0) S
CHEM 4473 Physical Measurements Laboratory (4 semester hours) Modules may include topics in physical chemistry and biophysics such as bionantechnology, calorimetry, centrifugation, computational methods, computer-instrument interfaces, electrochemistry, electronics, kinetics, literature skills, property of matter, spectroscopy, and statistical methods. Prerequisites: CHEM 3472 and CHEM 3321, or consent of instructor. (1-7) Y
CHEM 4V01 Topics in Chemistry (1 9 semester hours) Subject matter will vary from semester to semester. Examples would include, as required, bioorganic chemistry, industrial processes, applied spectroscopy, drugs and people, practical analysis, or other topics that span several subdisciplines. May be repeated for credit (9 hours maximum). Prerequisites: CHEM 2325 and 3322, or cConsent of instructor. ([1-9]-0) R
CHEM 4V91 Research in Chemistry (2 6 semester hours) Students will pursue an independent project under the supervision of a member of the Chemistry faculty. Prerequisites: Consent of supervising faculty and filing a research plan approved by supervising faculty and the Undergraduate Committee in Chemistry prior to the 12th class dayinstructor. This course satisfies the university advanced writing requirement. ([2-6]-0) S

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