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Cadet Corps Alumni Council

Reveille

The Cadet Corps Alumni Newsletter

Reveille is mailed or emailed to the members of CCAC as the issues are released. You can view back issues by clicking on the issue you would like to see. To download these issues you will need Adobe® Acrobat® Reader® which can be downloaded free from Adobe's website.

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Reveille or Rousse, the Wake Up Call

"Reveille" originated in medieval times, possibly around 1600, to wake the soldiers at dawn; "Rouse" was the signal for the soldier to arise. Rouse is the bugle call more commonly used in conjunction with the Last Post and to the layman is often incorrectly called Reveille. Although associated with the Last Post, Reveille is rarely used because of its length.

Today, the Rouse is associated with the last Post at all military funerals and services of Dedication and remembrance. It is played on the completion of one minute's silence, after the Last Post has been sounded. It calls the soldier's spirit to rise and prepare for another day.


Words to Reveille

Rev-eil-lee! Rev-eil-lee is sounding
The bugle calls you from your sleep; it is the break of day.
You've got to do your duty or you will get no pay.
Come, wake yourself, rouse yourself out of your sleep
And throw off the blankets and take a good peek at all
The bright signs of the break of day, so get up and do not delay.

Get Up!

Or-der-ly officer is on his round!
And if you're still a-bed he will send you to the guard
And then you'll get a drill and that will be a bitter pill:
So be up when he comes, be up when he comes,
Like a soldier at his post, a soldier at his post, all ser-ene.


Words to Rouse

Get up at once, get up at once, the bugle's sounding,
The day is here and never fear, old Sol is shining.
The Orderly Officer's on his rounds,


Reveille and Retreat begin with the firing of a cannon and the playing of a bugle. During these traditional ceremonies you can perform a few simple actions that are appropriate to honor the flag.

  • Pedestrians within earshot of the bugle call should stop and stand with their arms at their sides at the position of attention and face the flag. Civilians and military members in civilian clothes should place their right hand over their heart, while military members in uniform should render a salute throughout the ceremony.
  • Those operating a vehicle should come to a stop, step out and render appropriate courtesy as above, as should passengers.
  • In the case of large vehicles such as busses or trucks, where all occupants are in uniform, the driver should remain seated while the passengers disembark and render a salute.
  • During inclement weather, vehicle operators should bring their vehicle to a halt at the very least.