Fall Semester 2008

Auditory Neuroscience – Neural Basis of Speech Sound Processing HCS 7372     

Meeting time:  11:30 am – 2:30 pm CR1.202

Instructor: Dr. Michael P. Kilgard
Office: JO 4.304    
Office hours: Tuesday 10-11am
Office phone: (972) 883-2339
E-mail address: [email protected]

Course Description

    This course will review the basic neural mechanisms of speech sound processing.  Introductory lectures will provide students with the appropriate background for each topic, and discussions will explore classic and modern primary papers. Workload will consist of readings, class presentations, class participation, and weekly written critiques.  

   The focused nature of this course will be a useful supplement to a general education of brain function based on surveys of many fields. Because similar sensory coding principles apply throughout the brain the detailed description of speech processing provided by this course will serve as a conceptual starting point for thinking about other modalities. An additional aim of this course is to relate the discussed concepts to clinically relevant issues. This course assumes only a general understanding of basic neuroscience principles and will be useful to students interested in neuroscience, communication disorders, cognitive science, developmental psychology, biology, computer science, or neural networks.

Concepts:

·         Spectral cues

·         Temporal cues

·         Pitch

·         Generalization

·         Plasticity

Techniques/Approaches:

·         Psychophysics

·         Neurophysiology

·         Functional imaging (MEG, fMRI, PET)

·         Neuroethology

·         Rehabilitation

Course Requirements

    All assigned readings must be completed before each class.

Critiques -- one-fourth of final grade.

    Each week you will need to type a concise, thoughtful critique of one of the papers for discussion. Support your conclusions using concrete evidence and quotations, not merely your opinion. The following outline is suggested: (1) Summarize in 1-2 sentences the key take-home message(s) of the paper. (2) Place the paper in context within the literature we have covered in class. What central problems does it address? How does it differ from other work we studied? How does it advance the field? (3) Critique the methods and conclusions. Are there any flaws in technique or logic? Are the experiments or conclusions believable? (4) Discuss the paper in terms of key concepts we have covered in class. (5) Suggest improvements or additional work. What important related questions does the paper leave open? Critique assignments should be about a page long and should be on the primary research papers not the review articles.

Individual class participation – one-half of final grade (this will be highly quantitative).

In class presentations – one fourth of final grade.

 

Objectives
        On completion of this course, students should be able to:

 

Topics (and papers for discussion):

1.    Introduction Sensory Cortex – 8/27

2.    Cortical activity patterns predict speech discrimination ability.Nature Neuroscience, 2008 – 9/3


 

 

 

Speech + Cortex

9/10

Speech Sound Discrimination by Cats - Get It! UTDallas - all 4 versions »
JH Dewson - Science, 1964 - sciencemag.org
... show that after bilateral ablation of the in- sular-temporal cortex, cats are also
un- able to retain or relearn a discrimina- tion between the speech sounds [u ...
Cited by 34 - Related Articles - Web Search - Import into EndNote

Effects of ablations of temporal cortex upon speech sound discrimination in the monkey. - Get It! UTDallas - all 2 versions »
JH Dewson 3rd, KH Pribram, JC Lynch - Exp Neurol, 1969 - ncbi.nlm.nih.gov
Exp Neurol. 1969 Aug;24(4):579-91. Effects of ablations of temporal cortex upon
speech sound discrimination in the monkey. Dewson JH 3rd, Pribram KH, Lynch JC. ...
Cited by 25 - Related Articles - Web Search - Import into EndNote

9/17

Speech evoked activity in the auditory radiations and cortex of the awake monkey.
M Steinschneider, J Arezzo, HG Vaughan Jr - Brain Res, 1982 - ncbi.nlm.nih.gov
Click here to read Speech evoked activity in the auditory radiations and cortex
of the awake monkey. Steinschneider M, Arezzo J, Vaughan HG Jr. ...
Cited by 37 - Related Articles - Web Search - Import into EndNote - Check the Library Catalog

Responses of the human auditory cortex to vowel onset after fricative consonants - all 3 versions »
E Kaukoranta, R Hari, OV Lounasmaa - Experimental Brain Research, 1987 - Springer
... processing. Key words: Auditory cortex - Speech sounds - Magnetoencephalography
- Evoked responses - Man Introduction Paradoxically ...
Cited by 62 - Related Articles - Web Search - Import into EndNote - Check the Library Catalog

9/24

Tonotopic features of speech-evoked activity in primate auditory cortex.
M Steinschneider, JC Arezzo, HG Vaughan Jr - Brain Res, 1990 - ncbi.nlm.nih.gov
Click here to read Tonotopic features of speech-evoked activity in primate
auditory cortex. Steinschneider M, Arezzo JC, Vaughan HG Jr. ...
Cited by 18 - Related Articles - Web Search - Import into EndNote - Check the Library Catalog

Lateralization of phonetic and pitch discrimination in speech processing - Get It! UTDallas - all 4 versions »
RJ Zatorre, AC Evans, E Meyer, A Gjedde - Science, 1992 - sciencemag.org
... J. Neurosci. 22: 10501-10506 | Abstract » | Full Text » | PDF » Modulation
of the Auditory Cortex during Speech: An MEG Study. ...
Cited by 671 - Related Articles - Web Search - Import into EndNote

10/1

Speech-evoked activity in primary auditory cortex: effects of voice onset time. - all 2 versions »
M Steinschneider, CE Schroeder, JC Arezzo, HG … - Electroencephalogr Clin Neurophysiol, 1994 - ncbi.nlm.nih.gov
1994 Jan;92(1):30-43. Speech-evoked activity in primary auditory cortex: effects
of voice onset time. Steinschneider M, Schroeder CE, Arezzo JC, Vaughan HG Jr. ...
Cited by 68 - Related Articles - Web Search - Import into EndNote - Check the Library Catalog - BL Direct

Discrimination of speechlike contrasts in the auditory thalamus and cortex - Get It! UTDallas - all 5 versions »
N Kraus, T McGee, T Carrell, C King, T Littman, T … - The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 1994 - link.aip.org
Discrimination of speech
like contrasts in the auditory thalamus and cortex. [The
Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 96, 2758 (1994)]. ...
Cited by 45 - Related Articles - Web Search - Import into EndNote - BL Direct

10/8

Central Auditory System Plasticity Associated with Speech Discrimination Training - Get It! UTDallas - all 4 versions »
N Kraus, T McGee, TD Carrell, C King, K Tremblay, … - Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 1995 - MIT Press
... gle auditory cortex neurons have been observed to change their firing patterns during ...
of the central auditory system to just-perceptible differences in speech. ...
Cited by 108 - Related Articles - Web Search - Import into EndNote - BL Direct

Activation of Auditory Cortex During Silent Lipreading - Get It! UTDallas - all 12 versions »
GA Calvert, ET Bullmore, MJ Brammer, R Campbell, … - Science, 1997 - sciencemag.org
... suggests that these visual cues may influence the perception of heard speech before
speech sounds are categorized in auditory association cortex into distinct ...
Cited by 407 - Related Articles - Web Search - Import into EndNote - BL Direct

10/15

May BJ, Prell GS, Sachs MB.

Free Full TextVowel representations in the ventral cochlear nucleus of the cat: effects of level, background noise, and behavioral state.

J Neurophysiol. 1998 Apr;79(4):1755-67.

Towards a functional neuroanatomy of speech perception - Get It! UTDallas - all 13 versions »
G Hickok, D Poeppel - Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 2000 - Elsevier
... representations that are used during lexical access), but rather serves to interface
sound-based representations of speech in auditory cortex with articulatory ...
Cited by 281 - Related Articles - Web Search - Import into EndNote

10/22

Speech comprehension is correlated with temporal response patterns recorded from auditory cortex - all 11 versions »
E Ahissar, S Nagarajan, M Ahissar, A Protopapas, H … - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2001 - National Acad Sciences
... Taken together, these findings suggest that the auditory cortex can process speech
sentences at various rates, but that the extent of the "decodable ranges" of ...
Cited by 45 - Related Articles - Web Search - Import into EndNote - Check the Library Catalog - BL Direct

Spectral and Temporal Processing in Human Auditory Cortex - Get It! UTDallas - all 4 versions
RJ Zatorre, P Belin - Cerebral Cortex, 2001 - Oxford Univ Press
... Classic observations of aphasic patients have pointed to the importance of left
posterior temporal cortex in speech comprehension, and more recent evidence ...
Cited by 236 - Related Articles - Web Search - Import into EndNote - BL Direct

10/29

Modulation of the Auditory Cortex during Speech: An MEG Study - Get It! UTDallas - all 11 versions »
JF Houde, SS Nagarajan, K Sekihara, MM Merzenich - Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 2002 - MIT Press
Page 1. Modulation of the Auditory Cortex during Speech: An MEG Study John F.
Houde* ,1 , Srikantan S. Nagarajan* ,1 , Kensuke Sekihara 2 , ...
Cited by 61 - Related Articles - Web Search - Import into EndNote - BL Direct

Functional Neuroimaging of Speech Perception in Infants - Get It! UTDallas - all 16 versions »
G Dehaene-Lambertz, S Dehaene, L Hertz-Pannier - Science, 2002 - sciencemag.org
... yet known, however, whether this asymmetry reflects an early specialization for
speech perception or a greater responsivity of the left temporal cortex to any ...
Cited by 191 - Related Articles - Web Search - Import into EndNote - BL Direct

11/5

From Ear to Cortex A Perspective on What Clinicians Need to Understand About Speech Perception and … - Get It! UTDallas - all 5 versions »
S Nittrouer - Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, 2002 - ASHA
Page 1. From Ear to Cortex: A Perspective on What Clinicians Need to Understand
About Speech Perception and Language Processing Susan ...
Cited by 17 - Related Articles - Web Search - Import into EndNote - BL Direct

Hierarchical processing in spoken language comprehension - Get It! UTDallas - all 7 versions »
MH Davis, IS Johnsrude - Journal of Neuroscience, 2003 - Soc Neuroscience
... Key words: speech; language; auditory cortex; hierarchical processing; primate;
human; inferior frontal gyrus; temporal lobe; hippocampus; sentence processing ...
Cited by 85 - Related Articles - Web Search - Import into EndNote - BL Direct

The neuroanatomical and functional organization of speech perception - Get It! UTDallas - all 14 versions »
SK Scott, IS Johnsrude - Trends in Neurosciences, 2003 - Elsevier
... analysis of the peaks of activation seen in functional imaging studies that have
looked at speech and non-speech auditory processing in the temporal cortex. ...
Cited by 159 - Related Articles - Web Search - Import into EndNote

11/12

 [PDF] The analysis of speech in different temporal integration windows: Cerebral lateralization as … - Get It! UTDallas - all 5 versions »
D Poeppel - Speech Communication, 2003 - ling.umd.edu
... Keywords: Temporal integration; Timing; Hemispheric asymmetry; Neural basis of speech;
Auditory cortex; Gamma band; Theta band; Oscillations 1. Introduction ...
Cited by 92 - Related Articles - View as HTML - Web Search - Import into EndNote

Multisensory Integration of Dynamic Faces and Voices in Rhesus Monkey Auditory Cortex - Get It! UTDallas - all 5 versions »
AA Ghazanfar, JX Maier, KL Hoffman, NK Logothetis - Journal of Neuroscience, 2005 - neuroscience.org
... Bernstein LE, Auer ET, Moore JK, Ponton CW, Don M, Singh M (2002) Visual speech
perception without primary auditory cortex activation. ...
Cited by 80 - Related Articles - Web Search - Import into EndNote

11/19 Student Presentations

Liikkanen LA, Tiitinen H, Alku P, Leino S, Yrttiaho S, May PJ.

The right-hemispheric auditory cortex in humans is sensitive to degraded speech sounds.

Neuroreport. 2007 Apr 16;18(6):601-5.  – presented by _________

 

Teismann IK, Sörös P, Manemann E, Ross B, Pantev C, Knecht S.

Responsiveness to repeated speech stimuli persists in left but not right auditory cortex.

Neuroreport. 2004 Jun 7;15(8):1267-70. – presented by _________

 

?  – presented by _________

 

? – presented by _________

 

? – presented by _________

 

11/26 – Student Presentations

 

Luo H, Poeppel D.

Phase patterns of neuronal responses reliably discriminate speech in human auditory cortex.

Neuron. 2007 Jun 21;54(6):1001-10. – presented by _________

 

Schatteman TA, Hughes LF, Caspary DM.

Aged-related loss of temporal processing: altered responses to amplitude modulated tones in rat dorsal cochlear nucleus.

Neuroscience. 2008 Jun 12;154(1):329-37.  – presented by _________

 

?  – presented by _________

 

? – presented by _________

 

? – presented by _________

 

 

12/3

Cortical activity patterns predict speech discrimination ability - Get It! UTDallas
… , JA Shetake, V Jakkamsetti, KQ Chang, MP Kilgard - NATURE NEUROSCIENCE, 2008 - nature.com

Unpublished observations from Engineer, Ranasinghe, and Shetake

 

 Any schedule changes will be posted at:  www.utdallas.edu/~kilgard/AuditorySP08.htm

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