Last Name

First Name

Language

Annotation

Hacikyan

Agop J.

French

Hacikyan, Agop J. and Jean-Yves Soucy.  Summer Without Dawn.  Translated by Christina Le Vernoy and Joyce Bailey.  Toronto: McClelland and Stewart, 516 pp.  Cloth: $29.95.  ISBN 0-7710-3752-X.  [Un été sans aube. Montreal: Éditions Libre Expression, 1991].  This novel is the saga of one family’s struggle to survive the collapse of  the Ottoman Empire during the First World War.  The story takes place against the backdrop of the Armenian Massacre, when the Armenian people were deported from the empire and slaughtered or left to die of starvation.  The novel tells the story of Armenian journalist Vartan Balian who searches for his family throughout the Ottoman Empire.  Agop J. Hacikyan is the author of twenty-one books, including three novels, and has translated and edited the works of major Armenian poets and fiction writers.  Jean-Yves Soucy is the author of several novels, short story collections, and books of essays.  Both writers live in Montreal.

 

Hafiz

 

Farsi

Hafiz. The Gift: Poems by Hafiz, the Great Sufi Master. Tr. Daniel Ladinsky. Penguin Arkana. 1999. 333 pp. Paperback original: $13.95; ISBN 0-14-019581-5. Although relatively little known in the Western world, Shams-ud-d-dim Muhammad Hafiz is often considered one of the most beloved poets of Persia, along with Rumi, Kabir, and Saadi. He lived about the same time as Chaucer and when he died at the age of 70, he was thought to have produced as many as 5,000 poems, 500-700 of which have survived. Continuing the effort begun by Ralph Waldo Emerson, who translated Hafiz in the late 1800s, Daniel Ladinsky uses modern language that some might criticize as being too contemporary for such a venerable work. "To that I say—nothing doing," Ladinsky responds in his Preface. "The word translation comes from the Latin for 'to bring across.' My goal is to bring across, right into your lap, the wondrous spirit of Hafiz that lifts the corners of the mouth. I view this as a primary, no-holds-barred task. And I apologize for any language that may stop the beguine and not let the reader remain in Hafiz's tender strong embrace." Ladinsky has previously translated Hafiz's The Subject Tonight is Love and I Heard God Laughing.

 

 

Hahn

Oscar

Spanish

Oscar Hahn. Stolen Verses and Other Poems. Tr. and intro. James Hoggard. Evanston, IL. Northwestern University Press. 2000. 109 pp. Cloth: $22.95; ISBN 0-8101-1778-9. Bilingual. Oscar Hahn has been hailed by postmodernist master Enrique Lihn as "the premier poet of his generation." Pablo Neruda has praised Hahn's "great originality and intensity," and Mario Vargas Llosa has called Hahn's work "the most personal I've read in the poetry of our language in a long time." Stolen Verse and Other Poems features Hahn's newest works as well as a selection of poetry previously unavailable in English, including pieces such as "A Pensive Drowned Man Who Sometimes Drifts" and "Old Year 1973" that express Hahn's rage over the Pinochet coup. Employing forms ranging from sonnet to free verse, these poems embody what translator James Hoggard calls "strangeness in the world." Other translations by Hoggard include Hahn's The Art of Dying (1988) and Love Breaks (1991), and Tino Villanueva's Chronicle of My Worst Years (1994) published by TriQuarterly Books from Northwestern University Press.

 

Haidegger

Christine

German

Haidegger, Christine.  Mama Dear: Memoir of a Postwar Childhood in Europe.

            Translated by Heidi J. Petermichl with an afterword by Renate Welsh.

            Riverside, CA: Ariadne Press, 2002.  209 pp.  Paper.  ISBN 1-57241-

103-1.       [Zum Fenster hinaus, 1979].

 

In this novel, Haidegger’s protagonist, Irene, a ten-year-old girl, tells the story of her life in Europe in the aftermath of World War II.  She reveals her insights on the end of the war, the arrival of the American soldiers, her mother’s daily struggle for survival, and the unkind treatment her German mother receives from the villagers in their Austrian town.  Christine Haidegger has published seven books (poetry, novels, and short prose).  Mama Dear, her first novel, was published in German in 1979.  Translator ,  J. Petermichl was born in 1973.  She teaches English and German in Linz.

 

Hamsun

Knut

Norwegian

Knut Hamsun. Mysteries [Mysterier]. Tr. and intro. Sverre Lyngstad. New York. Penguin. 2001 [P. G. Philipsens Forlag, Kobenhavn, 1892]. 313 pp. Paper: $14.00; ISBN 0-14-118618-6. Mysteries is the story of John Nilsen Nagel, a mysterious stranger who suddenly disappears. Nagel is a complete outsider, a sort of modern Christ treated in a spirit of near parody. He condemns the politics and thought of the age, brings comfort to the "insulted and injured," and gains the love of two women suggestive of the biblical Mary and Martha. But there is a sinister side of him: in his vest he carries a vial of prussic acid . . . ." The novel creates a powerful sense of Nagel's stream of thought as he increasingly withdraws into the torture chamber of his own subconscious psyche.

 

Hamsun

Knut

Norwegian

Knut Hamsun.  Rosa [Rosa].  Tr. Sverre Lyngstad.  Sun & Moon Press/Consortium Book Sales and Distribution [Gyldendal Norsk Forlag, Christiana, 1909].  1997.  254 pp.  Paper:  $12.95; ISBN 1-55713-359-X.  In Rosa the reader encounters the narrator, the 22-year-old Parelius, as he observes the often comic and near-tragic events surrounding the lovely young widow Rosa, her previous husband Arentsen, and Hartvigsen, who desires to marry her and ultimately does.  As the story unfolds, we begin to see each of the characters, trapped in a small fishing village, hiding the truth:  Hartvigsen has, in fact, lied to Rosa about her husband's death, and, soon after, her "dead" husband shows up in Sirilund. 

 

Hamsun

Knut

Norwegian

Knut Hamsun. On Overgrown Paths [ gjengrodde stier]. Tr. Sverre Lyngstad. Green Integer. 1999 [Gyldendal Norsk Forlag, Oslo, 1949]. 244 pp. Paper: $12.95; ISBN 1-892295-10-5. Green Integer 22. On Overgrown Paths was written after World War II, at a time when Knut Hamsun was in police custody for his openly expressed Nazi sympathies during the German occupation of Norway. A Nobel laurate deeply beloved by his countrymen, Hamsun was now reviled as a traitor. The conclusion of the psychiatric report, which declared him to be sane but with "permanently impaired" faculties was emphatically refuted by the publication of this book in 1949—his apologia, filled with the proud sorrow of an old man. This is the first authoritative English translation of Hamsun's last work. Sverre Lyngstad translated Hamsun's Rosa, Pan, and Hunger, as well as several novels by Sigurd Hoel.

 

 

Handke

Peter

German

Peter Handke.  Walk About the Villages:  A Dramatic Poem [Über die Dörfer.  Dramatisches Gedicht].  Tr. Michael Roloff.  Ariadne Press [Suhrkamp Verlag, 1981].  1996.  Paper:  ISBN 1-57241-000-0.  The fourth part of Handke's "homecoming cycle," whose other three parts can be found under the American title A Slow Homecoming.  In Walk About the Villages the "prodigal" writer Gregor returns to his home village.  He and his brother Hans, a construction worker, and his shopkeeper sister have a dispute over the disposition of the house which the parents had built and the land which they had cleared with their own hands many years before. 

Hanh

Thich Nhat

Vietnamese

Thich Nhat Hanh.  The Blooming of a Lotus:  Guided Meditation Exercises for Healing and Transformation.  Tr. Annabel Laity.  Beacon Press.  1993.  139 pp.  Cloth:  $12.00; ISBN 0-8070-1222-X.  Based on the practices of conscious breathing and mindfulness, the 34 guided exercises in this new meditation manual bring beginning and experienced practitioners alike into closer touch with the state of our physical bodies, our inner selves, and the elements of the world around us.

 

HaNigrid

Shmuel

Hebrew

Shmuel HaNagid.  Selected Poems of Shmuel HaNagid.  Tr. Peter Cole.  Princeton University Press. 1996.  236 pp.  Cloth: $39.95; ISBN 0-691-01121-4.  Paper:  $14.95; ISBN 0-691-01120-6.  The first major poet of the Hebrew literary renaissance of Moslem Spain, HaNagid was also the prime minister of the Moslem state of Granada, battlefield commander of the non-Jewish Granadan army, and one of the leading religious figures in a medieval Jewish world that stretched from Andalusia to Baghdad.  Cole's translations capture the poet's combination of secular and religious passion, as well as his inspired linking of Hebrew and Arabic poetic practice.  Includes such works as "In Fact I Love That Fawn," "The War with Yadir," "Stab Your Heart," "Could Kings Right a People Gone Bad," and "See the Fraud Flow By."  Cole is the author of Rift, a book of poems.

 

Haqqi

Yahya

Arabic

Yahya Haqqi. Blood and Mud: Three Narratives by Yahya Haqqi [Dima' wa-tin]. Tr. Pierre Cachia. Pueblo, CO. Passeggiata Press. 1999 (1986). 127 pp. Paper: ISBN 1-57889--093-4. Yahya Haqqi (1905-1990) was an Egyptian fiction writer noted for his touches of humor, for a deft, fine-textured style in which he made free use of the colloquial, and for a restrained, emotionally calibrated, and often tangential approach to his subjects. The narratives published together in this collection each has a sufficiently elaborate plot to have the makings of a novelette. "The Postmaster" is woven around an actual occurrence, in which a father was driven by a stern code of conduct to kill his daughter for having yielded to a sexual temptation. The story entitled "Abu Foda" is an exposition of elemental—not to say crude—passions in a grim environment, and the third narrative, "The Gypsy: A Prison Tale," casts an intriguing sidelight on the life of Egypt's gypsies, who have been all but ignored in modernist writings.

 

Haqqi

Yahya

Arabic

Yahya Haqqi.  Blood and Mud: Three Novelettes by Yahya Haqqi[Dima 'wa-tin]. Tr. Pierre Cachia. Passegiata Press. 1999 [Cairo, 1986]. 133 pp. Paper: ISBN 1-57889-093-4. Yahya Haqqi (1905-1990) was an Egyptian fiction writer noted for his touches of humor, a deft, fine-textured style in which he made free use of the colloquial, and a restrained, often tangential approach to his subject, even at a time when the reading public relished heavy, melodramatic effects. The three narratives collected here are representative of Haqqi's early literary output, each of them with a sufficiently elaborate plot to have the making of a novelette. "The Postmaster" is a tale woven around an actual occurrence, in which a father was driven by a stern code of honor to kill his daughter for having yielded to a sexual temptation. The story entitled, "Abu Foda" is an exposition of elemental passions in a grim environment, and the third work, "The Gypsy," casts an intriguing light on the life of Egypt's gypsy population.

 

Harpman

Jacqueline

French

Jacqueline Harpman. Orlanda. Tr. Ros Schwartz. Harvill Press. 1999 [Editions Bernard Grasset, Paris, 1996]. 214 pp. Paper: 1-86046-488-2. How would it be to jump into the skin of another? To be both man and woman at once? Orlanda is the story of Aline Berger, mousy, middle-aged college lecturer who struggles to get through Virginia Woolf's Orlando while preparing for a seminar. As she reads, her subconscious frustrations with a nagging mother and indifferent lover find their voice in a young man, Lucien Lefrčne, who is sitting at a nearby table in the café at the Gare du Nord. Aline takes the train back to her sensible life and is followed by Aline/Lucien, dubbed Orlanda, who brings along chaos, yearning, joy, and a powerful new sense of liberation. Jacqueline Harpman is a psychoanalyst-cum-novelist who was awarded the Prix Médicis for Orlanda. Ros Schwartz has translated fiction by authors such as Ousmane Sembene, Andrée Chedid, and Sebastien Japrisot, as well as many non-fiction works.

 

Härtling

Peter

German

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe.  Goethe: The Collected Works:  Vol. 9:  Wilhelm Meister's Apprenticeship.  Ed. and Tr. Eric A. Blackall.  Princeton University Press.  1995.  387 pp.  Paper:  ISBN 0-691-04344-2.  Wilhelm Meister's Apprenticeship, a novel of self-realization greatly admired by the Romantics, has been called the first Bildungsroman and has had a tremendous influence on the history of the German novel.  The story centers on Wilhelm, a young man living in the mid-1700s who strives to break free from the restrictive world of economics and seeks fulfillment as an actor and playwright.  Along with Eric Blackall's fresh translation of the work, this edition contains notes and an afterword by the translator that aims to put this novel into historical and artistic perspective for 20th-century readers while showing how it defies categorization.

 

Hasegawa

Machiko

Japanese

Machiko Hasegawa. The Wonderful World of Sazae-san. Tr. Jules and Dominic Young. Kodansha International (Tokyo) and Kodansha America. 1999. 160 pp. Paper: $12.00; ISBN 4-7700-2157-7. Bilingual. First published in 1946, the Sazae-san comic strip appeared daily in the Asahi Shimbun newspaper from 1949-1974 and is still Japan’s best-loved strip, centering on Sazae, a cheerful, scatter-brained heroine with a very ordinary family. Endearing itself to two generations of Japanese, the strip has become a phenomenal publishing success, with more than 62 million copies of the comic sold in book form. A host of popular adaptations has appeared in other media, from radio programs to an animated television series and even movies. For readers unfamiliar with Japan, the Sazae-san comic offers a rare glimpse into the culture’s daily life, customs, and family relationships. Twelve volumes are available in this bilingual series.

 

Hasler

Eveline

German

Eveline Hasler.  Flying with Wings of Wax:  The Story of Emily of Kempin-Spyri [Die Wachsflügelfrau].  Tr. Edna McCown.  Fromm International.  1994.  213 pp.  Cloth:  $21.95; ISBN 0-88064-151-7.  Eveline Hasler brings to life one of the pioneering feminists of the 19th-century─Emily Kempin, the first woman to earn a Doctorate of Law in Europe and the founder of the first women's school in New York City.  Though she emerges in America as a leading public figure, Kempin's family is homesick for Zurich.  She follows her family home, but her marriage comes apart.  She is eventually committed to an asylum in Basel.

 

Hauptman

Gerhart

German

Gerhart Hauptman.  Plays:  Before Dark, The Weavers, The Beaver Coat.  Eds. Reinhold Grimm and Caroline Molina y Vedia.  Continuum Books.  1994.  227 pp.  Cloth:  ISBN 0-8264-0726-9.  Paper:  0-8264-0727-7.  The German Library, Volume 57.  Three plays by one of the pioneers of modern drama.

 

Hayes

Joe

Spanish

Joe Hayes. Little Gold Star/Estrellita de Oro: A Cinderella Cuento retold in Spanish & English. El Paso. Cinco Puntos Press. 2000. Distributor: Consortium. 32 pp. Cloth: $15.95; ISBN 0-938317-49-0. Bilingual. The Cinderella story—common to cultures the world over—was brought to the New World by Spanish settlers and gradually evolved into the version that master storyteller Joe Hayes relates in Little Gold Star/Estrellita de Oro. Like every Cinderella tale, this is a wonderful celebration of the human spirit. As always, the kind heroine triumphs over her envious stepmother and stepsisters, but Hayes weaves the elements of the story together to show how the inner qualities of the characters are revealed in their appearance. Hayes is well-known for his bilingual tellings of stories where he slips back and forth between Spanish and English. He is the author of 18 books for children, including eight in both Spanish and English, including La Llorona/The Weeping Woman, Watch Out for Clever Women!/ˇCuidado con las mujeres astutas!, and most recently, Tell Me a Cuento/Cuéntame un Story (Cinco Puntos).

 

Hébert

Anne

French

Anne Hébert.  Burden of Dreams [L'enfant chargé de songes].  Tr. Sheila Fischman.  House of Anansi Press Limited [Editions du Seuil, 1992].  1994.  165 pp.  Cloth:  $22.95; ISBN 0-88784-166X.  As Julien seeks liberation in Paris, he is haunted by the memories of a fateful autumn on the banks of the Duchesnay River near Quebec City.  Until then, his reclusive childhood had been centered on his protective mother, Pauline, and his sister, Hélčne.  A wild and beautiful young woman captivates both Julien and Hélčne.  She promises them freedom, but her reckless urgings turn ecstasy and seduction into bitter tragedy.  This novel won the Governor General's Award for French fiction in 1992.  Hébert's acclaimed other works include Kamowiaska, In the Shadow of the Wind, and The First Garden.  Fischman won the Félix Antoine-Savard Prize for her translation of The First Garden. 

 

Hébert

Anne

French

Anne Hébert.  Day has no equal but the night [Le Jour n'a d'égal que la nuit].  Tr. Lola Lemire Tostevin.  Anansi [Les Editions du Boréal, 1992].  1997.  61 pp.  Paper:  $14.95; ISBN 0-88784-593-2.  Hébert's poems find profundity even in the most common occurrences in poems that meditate on nature, solitude, war, love, aging, and the creative process.  Some of the almost 50 poems are "Cities on the March," "The Sister of Charity," "Parricide," "Devastated Garden," "Reseal the Water," and "Let There Be God." 

 

Heidegger

Martin

German

Martin Heidegger.  Plato's Sophist [Platon:  Sophistes].  Trs. Richard Rojcewicz and André Schuwer.  Indiana University Press [Vittorio Klostermann].  1997 [1992].  496 pp.  Cloth:  $39.95; ISBN 0-253-33222-2.  This volume reconstructs Heidegger's lecture course at the University of Marburg in the winter semester of 1924-25, which was devoted to an interpretation of Plato and Aristotle.  Published originally as volume 19 of Heidegger's Collected Works, it is a major text not only because of its intrinsic importance as an interpretation of the Greek thinkers, but also because of its close, complementary relationship to Being and Time, composed in the same period.  In Plato's Sophist, Heidegger approaches Plato through Aristotle, devoting the first part of the lectures to an extended commentary on Book VI of the Nichomachean Ethics.  In a line-by-line interpretation of Plato's later dialogue, the Sophist, Heidegger takes up the relation of Being and non-being, the ontological problematic that forms the essential link between Greek philosophy and Heidegger's thought.

Heine

Heinrich

German

Heinrich Heine.  Songs of Love & Grief.  Tr. Walter W. Arndt.  Northwestern University Press.  1995.  227 pp.  Cloth: ISBN 0-8101-1323-6.  Paper: ISBN 0-8101-1324-4.  Bilingual.  Although many of Heine's poems are deceptively simple on the surface, the multiple allusions, word plays, and shifts and breaks in diction and tone make them almost untranslatable.  Arndt not only renders the meaning of the originals, but preserves the poems' rhyme schemes, moods, and multiple cultural resonances.  Arndt captures both the simplicity of the Germanic folk song structure and the Romantic pathos and imagery that Heine both evokes and undermines, revealing the identification with and alienation from German culture expressed so poignantly in Heine's poetry.  This bilingual edition includes an illuminating introduction by Heine scholar Jeffrey L. Sammons.  Arndt's distinguished translations include works by Goethe, Rilke, Busch, Morgenstern, Pushkin, Akhmatova, Schulz, Konwicki, and Benski. 

 

Heker

Liliana

Spanish

Liliana Heker.  The Stolen Party.  Tr. Alberto Manguel.  Coach House Press.  1994.  136 pp.  Paper:  $10.95; ISBN 0-88910-446-Z.  A collection of six stories from Heker, winner of the Casa de las Americas Prize.  It includes "Georgina Requeni or The Chosen One," "Early Beginnings or Ars Poetica," "Family Life," "Bishop Berkeley or Mariana of the Universe," "Jocasta," and "The Stolen Party."

 

Hellens

Franz

French

Franz Hellens. Memoirs from Elsinore [Mémoires d'Elseneur]. Tr. Howard Curtis. New York. Peter Lang AG. 2000. Cloth: $58.95; ISBN 0-8204-4469-3. Belgian Francophone Library 12. Memories from Elsinore is the first English publication of a major work by Belgian writer Franz Hellens. As a prime example of "fantastic realism," this novel takes its narrator through a series of adventures that range from the touchingly down-to-earth to the extravagantly bizarre. With its rich multiplicity of character and incident, as well as a narrative that surprises the reader at every turn, this book is an ideal introduction to a unique voice in 20th-century literature. Howard Curtis has translated three novels by Georges Simenon and works by Francophone writers from the Arab world.

 

Henisch

Peter

German

Peter Henisch. Stone's Paranoia: A Novel [Steins Paranoia]. Tr. and intro. Craig Decker. Riverside, CA. Ariadne Press. 2000 [Residenz Verlag, Salzburg, 1988]. 97 pp. Paper: ISBN 1-57241-089-2. Studies in Austrian Literature, Culture, and Thought. Translation Series. Paperback original. Born in Canada as the son of Austrian Jewish émigrés, Max Stone has been living peacefully in Vienna since the age of five, wanting only to be a "good Austrian." But one day in the mid-1980's, Stone enters a tobacco shop and becomes the unwitting and unwilling target of an anti-Semitic remark. Stone's inability to react to this sentence subsequently splits his identity in two, giving rise to a crisis that becomes both psychological and political, personal and national. Writer Peter Henisch has published numerous novels, plays, poems, and essays. His first text to be translated into English was Negatives of My Father, published by Ariadne in 1990. Craig Decker is currently editing Balancing Acts: Textual Strategies of Peter Henisch, forthcoming with Ariadne.

 

Henshui

Zhang

Chinese

Zhang Henshui.  Shanghai Express:  A Thirties Novel [P'ing Hu t'ung ch'e].  Gen. Ed. Howard Goldblatt.  Tr. William A. Lyell.  University of Hawaii Press.  1997.  258 pp.  Cloth:  ISBN 0-8248-1825-3.  Paper:  $12.95; ISBN 0-8248-1830-X.  In this suspenseful tale of seduction and deception, a wealthy banker is smitten by an alluring young woman while traveling aboard the express train from Beijing to Shanghai.  A consummate storyteller and one of the most popular novelists of his day, Zhang Henshui sweeps us on board with them and takes us through train stations and back and forth between first-, second-, and third-class cars, evoking the sights, sounds and smells of this microcosm of the urban world.  We see what the various travelers wear; we hear their conversations; we feel the chill or the warmth of each car; we detect a trace of perfume in one, pickled vegetables and greasy meats in another.  In addition to a gripping, fast-paced story filled with vivid sensory detail, Zhang's novel offers brilliant characterization that is at once cynical and sympathetic, and always humane.  Lyell has translated Lu Xun's Diary of a Madman. 

 

Herling

Gustav

Polish

Gustav Herling.  The Island:  Three Tales.  Tr. Ronald Strom.  Viking Penguin.  1993.  151 pp.  Cloth:  $20.00;  ISBN 0-670-84002-5.  The title story takes place on an island off the coast of Naples, where a decaying monastery casts its shadow over the timeless, isolated world.  A gifted young stonemason loses his sight and his senses in a mysterious grisly accident, an accident that deeply affects all associated with him. "The Tower" tells of a leper in the 18th century confined to the "Tower of Fright."  His story is that of the capacity of the human spirit to rise above suffering and alienation.  The final tale, "The Second Coming," is set in the medieval city of Orvieto during the Black Death.  Herling is best known for his acclaimed novel A World Apart.

 

Hermann

Ungar

German

Ungar, Hermann.  The Maimed.  Translated by Kevin Blahut.  Illustrated by

Pavel Růt.  Prague: Twisted Spoon Press, 2002.  220 pp.  Paper: $14.50.  ISBN 80-86264-13-0. 

 

            Ungar’s novel tells the dark tale of a highly neurotic, socially inept bank clerk who finds his meticulously ordered life overcome by emotional and physical chaos.  Hermann Unger wrote only two novels, several plays, and short stories before his untimely death in 1929 from acute appendicitis.  Over the past decade, there has been a resurgence of interest in his work, with the publication of new editions in Germany and new translations abroad.  Translator Kevin Blahut has an M.A. in German Language and Literature from Washington University and has spent time in Berlin and Prague studying German and Czech.  Specializing in Prague-German, his translations include three volumes of Kafka’s short prose and Severin’s Journey into the Dark by Paul Leppin.  He currently lives in New York.  Pavel Růt is a book designer and illustrator.  He is also the author of Prague Mysteries, which has been translated into a number of languages.    

 

Hernández

Miguel

Spanish

Miguel Hernández.  I Have Lots of Heart:  Selected Poems.  Tr. Don Share.  Bloodaxe Books/Dufour Editions, Inc.  1997/1998.  160 pp.  Paper:  $18.95; ISBN 1-85224-332-5.  Bilingual.  The poems of Miguel Hernández (1910-42) beam with a gentleness of heart.  After fighting on the Republican side in the Spanish Civil War, he was imprisoned until his death at the age of 31.  From his early formalism, paying homage to Góngora and Quevedo, to the final poems, which are passionate and bittersweet, Hernández's work is a dazzling reminder that force can never defeat spirit, and that courage is its own reward.  Poems include "Like the bull," "Soldiers and the snow," "You were like the young fig tree," "Before hatred," and "Imagination's tomb."  Share works as editor for Partisan Review. 

Hernández

Miguel

Spanish

Miguel Hernández. I Have Lots of Heart: Selected Poems. Tr. Don Share. Foreword Willis Barnstone. Newcastle upon Tyne. Bloodaxe Books/Dufour Editions. 1998. 160 pp. Paper: $18.95; ISBN 1-85224-332-5. Bilingual. Miguel Hernández (1910-1942) is one of the most revered poets in the Spanish-speaking world. After fighting on the Republican side in the Spanish Civil War, Hernández was imprisoned in several of Franco's jails, where he continued to write until his death from untreated tuberculosis in 1942 at the age of 31. From his early formalism, paying homage to Góngora and Quevado, to the final poems, which are passionate and bittersweet, Hernández's work is a dazzling reminder that force can never defeat spirit, and that courage has its own reward. Don Share's translations of Miguel Hernández received the P.E.N./New England Discovery Award for translation.

 

Hikmet

Nâzim

Turkish

Nâzim Hikmet.  Poems of Nâzim Hikmet.  Trs. Randy Blasing and Mutlu Konuk.  Persea Books.  1994.  242 pp.  Paper:  $12.95; ISBN 0-89255-198-4.  Hikmet (1902-1963), the greatest modern Turkish poet, was a political prisoner in Turkey for 18 years and spent the last 13 years of his life in exile.  This revised and enlarged selection of his finest work enables us at last to hear, in a single volume, the full range of his distinctive voice in the highly acclaimed versions that have made him an influential presence in contemporary poetry.  Includes such works as "A Spring Piece Left in the Middle," "Letters from a Man in Solitary," "Hazel Are My Lady's Eyes,"  "The Strangest Creature on Earth," "Faust's House," and "I'm Getting Used to Growing Old."

 

Hinton

David

Chinese

The Selected Poems of Po Chü-i. Tr. David Hinton. New Directions.   1999.   192 pp.   Paperback original:  $14.95;  ISBN 0-8112-1412-5.  The first separate edition in English of poetry by the classical Chinese poet, Po Chü-i (772-846 C.E.), one of the formulators of Zen thought, this volume encompasses the full range of his work, from the early poems of social protest to the later recluse poems that reflect Po Chü-i's lifelong devotion to both Taoist and Ch'an (Zen) Buddhist practice. Writing during the T'ang Dynasty, the period during which Chinese poetry experienced its first great flowering, Po Chü-i composed over 3,000 poems, many of which figure prominently in the 10th-century Japanese novel, The Tale of the Genji.  David Hinton was awarded the Harold Morton Landon Translation Award from the Academy of American Poets in 1997. Other translations by David Hinton published by New Directions include The Selected Poems of Tu Fu and The Selected Poems of Li Po.

 

Hiroshi

Noma

Japanese

Noma Hiroshi. "Dark Pictures" and other Stories. Tr. James Raeside. Ann Arbor. Center for Japanese Studies, University of Michigan. 2000. Cloth: $32.95; ISBN 0-939512-02-5. Paper: $15.95; ISBN 0-939512-03-3. Michigan Monograph Series in Japanese Studies, vol. 30. Contents include stories written in 1947, 1948, and 1951 respectively: "Dark Pictures" [Kurai E], "The Feeling of Disintegration" [Hokai Kankaku], and "A Red Moon in Her Face" [Kao No Naka No Akai Tsuki].

 

Hiršal

Josef

Czech

Josef Hiršal.  A Bohemian Youth [Pise_ mládí].   Tr. Michael Henry Heim.  Northwestern University Press.  1997.  85 pp.  Cloth:  ISBN 0-8101-1223-X.  Paper:  $14.95; ISBN 0-8101-1592-1.  Hiršal's experimental novel is a Dada-like romp through the life of a young man born into a Bohemian peasant family.  Told in five parts, the novel begins with "a word to the wise," moves on to the text proper, continues with notes and with notes to the notes, and ends with a note on the notes to the notes.  More than just a tongue-in-cheek parody of a literary memoir, however, it is a social history of the first rank:  it is a glimpse of the First Czechoslovak Republic as seen through the eyes of a young peasant firmly grounded in the provinces.  It abounds in the kind of intimate detail not found in history books--the manners of a Slovak peasant girl;  the mores of the town's homosexual; the sounds of popular music; the way people eat in wartime.  Heim is the translator of numerous works by Czech authors such as Bohumil Hrabal and Milan Kundera.  His translations of Dubravka Ugreši_'s Fording the Stream of Consciousness and Felix Roziner's A Certain Finkelmeyer have also been published by Northwestern. 

Hlawaty

Graziella

German

Graziella Hlawaty.  Bosch [Bosch oder Die Verwunderung der Hohltierchen].  Tr. Lutz Kümmling.  Ariadne Press.  1995.  298 pp.  Paper: ISBN 0-929497-87-2.  Michael Rodnoc, star director of historical films at an Italian Film Festival, feels himself haunted by the "subject" of his next film, a historical treatment of the medieval painter Hieronymus Bosch.  His life parallels that of the painter; they are both driven by the burning need to express the scenes played out around them.  In dealing with the historical past, Rodnoc finds he must also deal with his own personal past, fringed by the skeletons that those who surround him have in their closets.

 

Hnadke

Peter

German

Peter Handke.  Voyage to the Sonorous Land or The Art of Asking and The Hour We Knew Nothing of Each Other.  Tr. Gitta Honegger.  Yale University Press.  1996.  160 pp.  Cloth:  $25.00; ISBN 0-300-06273-7.  Paper:  $12.00; ISBN 0-300-06274-5.  In these two plays, here translated into English for the first time, Handke inquires into the boundaries and life-affirming qualities of language.  At a time when language no longer seems to serve the purposes of a genuine human community, Handke asks, is such a community possible?  In Voyage, a cockeyed optimist and a spoilsport lead a group of characters to the hinterland of their imaginations, where they search not for the right answers but for the right questions. Hour takes place in a city square where more than 400 characters pass by one another without speaking a single word.  Honegger is chair of the Department of Drama at the Catholic University of America.

 

Hřeg

Peter

Danish

Peter Hřeg.  Smilla's Sense of Snow [Frřken Smillas fornemmelse for sne].  Tr. Tiina Nunnally.  Farrar Straus and Giroux [Munksgaard, Copenhagen, 1992].  1993.  453 pp.  Cloth:  $21.00; ISBN 0-374-26644-1.  Smilla Qaavigaaq Jaspersen, the protagonist of this novel, which was published originally in 1992, is a 37-year-old single woman without children.  Her six-year-old Inuit neighbor, Isaiah, falls off a roof and is killed.  Smilla does not believe that it is an accident.  She decides to investigate and discovers that even the police do not want her to get involved.  But she is stubborn enough to pursue her course of action and her investigation takes her from a fervently religious accountant to a tough-talking pathologist and an alcoholic shipping magnate and into the secret files of the Danish company responsible for extracting most of Greenland's mineral wealth.  Her saga finally ends up on a ship with an international cast of villains bound for a mysterious mission on an uninhabitable island of Greenland.  The chapters of the novel are entitled, respectively, "The City," "The Sea," "The Ice."  Included are two maps of Greenland and downtown Copenhagen.  This is Hřeg's first novel to be published in English. 

Peter Hřeg.  Borderliners [De mĺske egnede].  Tr. Barbara Haveland.  Farrar, Straus and Giroux [Munksgaard/ Rosinante, 1993].  1994.  277 pp.  Cloth:  $22.00; ISBN 0-374-11554-0.  Borderliners is set in the sealed-off world of an elite private school in Copenhagen in the 1970s.  Peter, the narrator, has grown up in institutions and is given a last chance to join "normal" society when he is accepted at Biehl's Academy.  Of course, he is drawn to the school's outsiders:  Katarina, a recently orphaned young woman with whom he falls in love; and August, a psychotic boy who has murdered his parents after years of abuse.  Together they discover that the school is using them in an experiment in controlling children, an experiment that, almost inevitably, has tragic consequences.

 

Hoel

Sigurd

Norwegian

Sigurd Hoel.  The Road to the World's End [Veien til verdens ende].  Tr. Sverre Lyngstad.  Sun & Moon Press/Consortium Book Sales [Gyldendal Norsk Forlag, Oslo, 1933].  1995.  351+ pp.  Paper:  $13.95; ISBN 1-55713-210-0.  A classic study of childhood and adolescence, this book has a dense image structure and a thematic range and depth that only an adult mind and sensibility could master.  Hoel's other major writings are The Troll Circle and Meeting at the Milestone.  Sverre Lyngstad has translated Tolstoy, Hoel, Knut Faldbakken, and Kjell Askildsen. 

 

Hoem

Edvard

Norwegian

(Nynorsk) Edvard Hoem. Ave Eva: A Norwegian Tragedy [Ave Eva: Herregĺrdsroman]. Tr., intro., and notes Frankie Belle Shackelford. Riverside, CA. Xenos Books. 2001 [Forlaget Oktober, 1987]. 296 pp. Paper: $17.00; ISBN 1-879378-42-6. Edvard Hoem is a major writer of modern Norway, following the radical tradition of Knut Hamsun and Jens Bjorneboe. He writes in Nynorsk, or "New Norwegian," which is the second official language of the country and the one with roots in the speech of the people. In this dark, brooding novel, Edmund Saknevik is an orphan and outcast who returns to Norway from exile to Norway in order to farm his ancestral estate. He finds his country drastically transformed: friends have matured and made their careers, foreign influences have supplanted native ones, and oil interests have ravaged the landscape. Yet the past endures in traditional celebrations, the prominence of the church, and bitter memories of the Nazi occupation. Edmund's attempts to reclaim his history, his language, and his purpose in life retell the timeless and universal story of a man seeking to regain paradise. Translator Frankie Belle Shackelford includes a short Introduction, a list of characters, and notes on the language and editing.

 

Hoffman

Yoel

Hebrew

Yoel Hoffman.  Katschen & The Book of Joseph.  Trs. David Kriss, Alan Treister, Eddy Levenston.  New Directions.  1998.  176 pp.  Cloth:  $17.95; ISBN 0-8112-1373-0.  These two novellas display the poetry and hypnotic verve of Hoffman's atomized language.  "The Book of Joseph" tells the tragic story of a widowed Jewish tailor and his son in 1930s Berlin.  "Katschen" gives a child's-eye view of a boy orphaned in Palestine.

 

Hoffman

Yoel

Hebrew

Yoel Hoffmann. The Christ of Fish [Kristus shel dagim]. Tr. Eddie Levenston. New Directions. 1999 [Keter Publishing, Israel, 1991]. 160 pp. Cloth: $21.95; ISBN 0-8112-1419-2. Yoel Hoffmann creates a novel out of a mosaic of two hundred and thirty-three pieces of Aunt Magda's life in Tel Aviv. Magda is a widow from Vienna who still speaks German after decades of living in Israel. The myriad mini-chapters offer multiple views of the heroine—her childhood, marriage, nephew, best friend, stolen handbags, apple strudel, a gentleman admirer. The Christ of Fish was originally published in English translation in Conjunctions 24: Critical Mass in 1995, which was Yoel Hoffmann's first appearance in print in the U. S. Two of his previous novels, Bernhard and Katschen & The Book of Joseph, were published by New Directions in 1998. 

 

Hoffmann

Yoel

Hebrew

Yoel Hoffmann. The Heart is Katmandu [Lev hu Katmandu]. Tr. Peter Cole. New York. New Directions. 2001 [Keter, Israel, 1999]. 144 pp. Cloth: $22.95; ISBN 0-8112-1465-6. First published last year in Israel to enormous acclaim, The Heart is Katmandu tells a tale of new love—paradise gained. Set in today's Haifa and presented in a mosaic of 237 dream-like small chapters, it is a book in which shyness and stumbling tenderness emerge triumphant. Poet Peter Cole captures the kaleidoscopic colors of the intense original style of one of Israel's most celebrated avant-garde writers. Other novels by Hoffmann include Katschen & The Book of Joseph, Bernhard, and The Christ of Fish, all available from New Directions. Peter Cole's most recent book of poems is Hymns & Qualms. He has translated widely from medieval and contemporary Hebrew.

 

Hofmann

Gert

German

Gert Hofmann.  The Film Explainer [Der Kinoerzähler].  Tr. Michael Hofman.  Northwestern University Press [Carl Hanser Verlag Munchen, 1990].  1996.  250 pp.  Cloth:  $26.95; ISBN 0-8101-1293-0.  Winner of the 1995 Independent Foreign Fiction Award.  The story begins in the early 1930s in Limbaugh, a small industrial village in Saxony suffering a severe depression; most people are out of work.  A young boy lives with his mother and grandparents in a small apartment.  The boy, grandfather, Karl Hofmann, narrates silent movies at the local Apollo cinema.  The job pays poorly and is largely unnecessary, as the films have subtitles and the audiences are quite small, but Karl sees himself as an artist.  Obsessed to the point of megalomania, he is convinced that only his explanation will make the movies accessible to the ever-shrinking audience.  Soon the "talkies" arrive, and Karl is explaining only two films per week.  He argues with the Jewish theater owner and loses his sense of purpose and joins the Nazi Party─the first step toward his horrible end.

 

Holappa

Pentti

Finnish

Pentti Holappa. A Tenant Here: Pentti Holappa-Selected Poems, 1977-1997. Tr. Herbert Lomas. Dublin. Dedadus Press/Dufour Editions. 2000. 120 pp. Paper: $13.95; ISBN 1-901233-47-2. Poetry Europe Series No. 7. Pentti Holappa was born in Finland in 1927 and is currently the President of the European Academy of Poetry. Since his first volume of poetry, A Fool in the Hall of Mirrors, Holappa has been considered a "fool" among those who are at home in the conventional wisdom. He invents intriguing parables, but he speaks from the heart and his persona comes across clearly and engagingly in his poems of tortured love, revealing fantasies, surrrealistic excursions, and simple lyric statements. Although his work has been widely translated abroad, this is his first volume in English. Herbert Lomas won the Poetry Society's 1991 biennial translation award for his Contemporary Finnish Poetry (Bloodaxe).

 

Hřlmebakk

Sigbjřrn

Norwegian

Sigbjřrn Hřlmebakk.  The Carriage Stone [Karjolsteinen].  Tr. Frances D. Vardamis.  Dufour Editions, Inc. [Gyldenal Norsk Forlag, 1975].  1996.  192 pp.  Cloth: $25.00; ISBN 0-8023-1305-1.  Paper: $13.95; ISBN 0-8023-1309-4.  Winner of the 1975 Norwegian Critics' Prize.  Hřlmebakk explores the question of how we can thrive knowing that death is our reward by describing an unusual friendship between a socialist writer and a former Lutheran minister, each confronting the death of a loved one.  Central to the plot is the minister's unsettling confession in which he describes the sinister events in his childhood that led to his calling, his subsequent loss of faith, his struggles with the problem of evil, and his encounter with the Carriage Stone─the pivotal point between life and death where hope is found and lives are forever changed.  Hřlmebakk's other works include The Fimbul Winter, The Maiden's Leap, and Twelve Men from Trřndelag and Two Other Stories.

 

Holub

Miroslav

Czech

Miroslav Holub.  Supposed to Fly:  A Sequence from Pilsen, Czechoslovakia.  Tr. Ewald Osers.  Bloodaxe Books/Dufour Editions.  1996.  160 pp.  Paper:  $16.95; ISBN 1-85224-274-4.  Supposed to Fly is a highly original and entertaining gathering of poems─with some prose interruptions─drawn from his native city Plzen (Pilsen).  The book also includes surrealist photographs accompanied by equally surrealist or absurdist captions.  Poems include, among others, "Punch's dream," "On fencing," "Escalation," "Spinal cord," "Pocket Christmas," "Herbarium," "The searching tram," "Central cemetery," "Deukalion's people," "Half a hedgehog," and "What to ink out." 

 

Holubová

Miloslava

Czech

Miloslava Holubová. More Than One Life [Vic než jeden život]. Tr. Alex Zucker with Lyn Coffin and Zdenka Brodská. Hydra Books/Northwestern University Press. 1999 [Melantrich, Prague, 1994]. 104 pp. Cloth: $22.95; ISBN 0-8101-1705-3. More than One Life is a chronicle of several generations of an upper-middle-class Czech family, told from the point of view of an unnamed woman who reached adulthood in the 1930s. Beginning in the years preceeding WW II, the novel concentrates on the narrator's tragically mismatched parents and the children's attempts to come to terms with each of them. The frustrated father takes his hostility out on his children, his volatility increasing to the point of ultimately abandoning his family. The narrator is forced to analyze her own half-buried memories and feelings of relief, guilt, and fear. As she tries to reconstruct childhood events by comparing her own recollections with those of her siblings, she comes to view her entire family in a new way, with respect and even forgiveness. This is the first novel by Miloslava Holubová to be translated into English.

 

Homer

 

Greek

Homer in English.  Ed. George Steiner.  Penguin Books.  1996.  357 pp.  Paper:  $14.95; ISBN 0-14-044621-4.  From Lydgate's Troy Book, Chaucer's Troylus and Criseyde, and Shakespeare's Troilus and Cressida to Pound's Cantos, Joyce's Ulysses, and Derek Walcott's Omeros, Homer has been the most translated author in our literature.  Homer has elicited a fantastic wealth and quality of response, from Hobbes to Gladstone, from T. E. Lawrence to Robert Graves.  Translations by Chapman, Dryden, Pope, Shelley, and Christopher Logue are masterpieces in their own right.  This selection assembles highlights and representative movements from six centuries.

 

Homer

 

Greek

Homer. Iliad, Books 1-12 and Books 13-24. Tr. A. T. Murray. Revised by William F. Wyatt. Harvard University Press. 1999. Volume 1: 591 pp. Cloth: ISBN 0-674-99579-1. Volume 2: 656 pp. Cloth: ISBN 0-674-99580-5. The Loeb Classical Library 170-171. Bilingual. The writer called Homer, author of the Iliad and the Odyssey, was the eighth-century B.C. Ionian Greek who first brought literacy to Greece and, in a sense, to the world. This new edition of Homer's stirring heroic account of the Trojan War and its passions features the Greek text facing William F. Wyatt's updated version of A. T. Murray's 1925 prose translation. Although the diction has been modernized throughout, there is little substantive change to Murray's faithful English rendering.

 

Horace

 

Latin

Horace.  Horace's Odes and Epodes.  Tr. David Mulroy.  The University of Michigan Press.  1994.  242 pp.  Cloth:  ISBN 0-472-10531-0.  Mulroy presents the Odes and Epodes of Horace, who was one of the Augustan regime's best known and most talented poets.  Intended for those with little knowledge of these works as well as for those with a more experienced ear, Mulroy's translations are accompanied by explanatory notes on the individual poems.  Appendices are also provided that offer information on Suetonius' biography of Horace, on ambiguity in Horace's personal allusions, and on the theme of sadism in Horace's writings.

 

Houellebecq

Michel

French

Michel Houellebecq. The Elementary Particles [Particules élémentaires]. Tr. Frank Wynne. New York. Alfred A. Knopf. 2000 [Flammarion, Paris, 1998]. 263 pp. Cloth: $25.00; ISBN 0-375-40770-7. An international phenomenon, The Elementary Particles is being called France's biggest literary sensation since Françoise Sagan and Albert Camus, having spread throughout Europe and now available in 30 languages. The novel's central characters, Bruno and Michel, were born to a bohemian mother (but they had different fathers, of course) at the height of the 60s. Following their parents' inevitable divorce, the boys endured separate childhoods and developed distinct identities. Bruno—a failure to his own family and literary calling—is pursued by sexual obsession and madness. Michel—a wholly asexual molecular biologist—expresses his disgust with society by engineering one that frees mankind at last from its uncontrollable, destructive urges. Michel Houellebecq's previous novel is entitled Whatever [Extension du domaine de la lutte].  

 

Houellebecq

Michel

French

Michel Houellebecq. Whatever: A Novel [Extension du domaine de la lutte]. Tr. Paul Hammond. Serpent's Tail. 1999 [Editions Maurice Nadeau, 1994]. 155 pp. Paper: $14.99; ISBN 1-85242-584-9. Just thirty, with a well-paid job and no love-life, the narrator of this novel smokes four packs of cigarettes a day and writes weird animal stories in his spare time. He is tolerably content in his boredom until he's packed off with the "unimaginably ugly" Raphaël to train provincial civil servants in the use of a new computer system. A huge hit in France and now being made into a movie, Whatever made poet, essayist, and cultural commentator Michel Houellebecq the spokesman for a new generation. Free from the baggage of history, Houellebecq has found a sarcastic and witty voice with which to capture the rituals of daily life and to articulate the vanishing freedom of a world over-determined by science.

 

Hrabal

Bohumil

Czech

Bohumil Hrabal.  The Little Town Where Time Stood Still [Mestecko, kde se zastavil cas].  Tr. James Naughton.  Pantheon Books.  1993.  302 pp.  Cloth:  $23.00; ISBN 0-679-42225-0.  Also includes Cutting It Short.  In the 1930s Europe is tangoing to the tune of a new age, but in rural Czechoslovakia Maryska dances to a rhythm all her own.  As World War II draws to a close and communism looms on the horizon, Maryska and her town appear to have survived unscathed.  But subtle changes begin to appear--in Maryska and her family, and most notably at the brewery which dominates her town, where the new political order creates tensions that tear through the social fabric of the town in ways that she in her wildest days could not possibly have imagined.  Hrabal also wrote Closely Watched Trains, the film version of which received an Academy Award in 1967.

 

Hsiung

Yang

Chinese

Yang Hsiung.  The Canon of Supreme Mystery [T'ai hsüan ching].  Tr. Michael Nylan.  State University of New York Press.  1993.  680 pp.  Cloth:  ISBN 0-7914-1395-0.  As the first grand synthesis of classic Chinese thought, Canon of Supreme Mystery (ca. 4 B.C.) occupies a place in all of Chinese intellectual history roughly comparable to that of the Summa Theologica of Thomas Aquinas in the West.  As one of the few original works by a recognized philosophical master to have survived from the formative Han period, the Mystery provides us today with the single best remaining clue to early attempts to situate the individual in family, state bureaucracy, and cosmos.

 

Hua

Bai

Chinese

      Bai Hua.  The Remote Country of Women [Yüan fang yu ko erh kuo].  Series:  Fiction from Modern China--General Editor:  Howard Goldblatt.  Trs. Qingyun Wu and Thomas O. Beebee.  University of Hawaii Press [Sanmin Publishers, 1988].  1994.  375 pp.  Cloth:  ISBN 0-8248-1591-2.  Paper:  ISBN 0-8248-1611-0.  Bai Hua shifts from tragicomic farce to earthy eroticism to modernist playwriting in this carefully wrought exploration of the clash between two ways of life.  In alternating chapters, the novel tells the stories of Sunamei, a winsome young woman from a rural matriarchal community, and Liang Rui, a self-absorbed man who is also weary witness to the Cultural Revolution.  Through his two protagonists, Bai Hua addresses themes of the repression and freedom of sexuality, the brutality of modernity, and the fluidity of gender roles as the novel moves hypnotically and inevitably toward a collision between two worlds.  The work has been translated into French, German, and Russian.  It appears now in English for the first time.

 

Hua

Yu

Chinese

Yu Hua.  The Past and the Punishments.  Tr. Andrew F. Jones.  University of Hawaii Press. 1996.  277 pp.  Cloth:  $32.00; ISBN 0-8248-1782-6.  Paper:  $14.95; ISBN 0-8248-1817-2.  This is the first collection of short fiction by Yu Hua to appear in English.  It takes one on a haunting and harrowing journey from classical China through the Cultural Revolution and into the new era of economic reform.  It includes eight stories:  "On the Road at Eighteen," "Classical Love," "World Like Mist," "The Past and the Punishments," "1986," "Blood and Plum Blossoms," "The Death of a Landlord," and "Predestination." 

 

Huerta

Efraín

Spanish

Efraín Huerta. 500,000 Azaleas: The Selected Poems of Efraín Huerta. Tr. Jim Normington. Ed. Jack Hirschman. Intro Ilan Stavans. Willimantic, CT. Curbstone Press. 2001. 200 pp. Paper: $15.95; ISBN 1-880684-73-X. Bilingual. In verses that fuse highly original imagery with exuberant rhythms, Efraín Huerta probes the cultures of both Mexico and "el Norte" from the impact of racism in Mississippi to political corruption in Mexico. Since he demanded for life and art the same freedom he demanded for politics, his poems are passionate outcries to love and justice, characterized by original metaphors and an acerbic wit that earned him the nickname "Crocodile." Ilan Stavan's introduction defines Huerta's place in Mexican letters and illuminates his remarkable originality, noting especially the literary culture in which Huerta has his roots. Translator Jim Normington was a founding member of ALTA who has been widely published for the past 20 years. Jack Hirschman has published more than 30 translations of poetry from eight languages.

 

Hugo

Victor

French

Victor Hugo. Selected Poems of Victor Hugo. Tr. E. H. and A. M. Blackmore. Chicago. University of Chicago Press. 2001. 631 pp. Cloth: $35.00; ISBN 0-226-35980-8. Bilingual. Although best known as the author of Les Misérables and Notre Dame de Paris, Victor Hugo was primarily a poet—one of the most important and prolific in French history. Despite his renown, however, there are few comprehensive collections of his verse available and fewer translated editions. E. H. and A. M. Blackmore have collected Hugo's essential verse into a single bilingual volume that showcases all facets of his oeuvre, including intimate love poems, satires against the political establishment, serene meditations, religious verse, and narrative poems illustrating his mastery of storytelling and his abiding concern for the social issues of his time. More than half of the 8,000 lines of verse included in this volume appear for the first time in English, providing readers with a new perspective on each period of Hugo's career and aspects of his style. Introductions to each section guide the reader through the stages of his writing, while notes on individual poems provide information not found in most French-lanugage editions. Illustrated with Hugo's own paintings and drawings, this new edition is being published on the eve of the tricentenary of Hugo's birth in 1802. The Blackmores are editors and translators of Six French Poets of the Nineteenth Century.

 

Huong

Duong Thu

Vietnamese

Duong Thu Huong. Memories of a Pure Spring. Tr. Nina McPherson and Phan Huy Duong. New York. Hyperion East. 1999. 340 pp. Cloth: $23.95; ISBN 0-7868-6581-4. Although her novels are banned in her native country, Duong Thu Huong remains Vietnam's most popular writer and her books have received critical acclaim all over the world. Memories tells the story of the marriage between Suong, a young peasant girl, and her husband, Hung, and their relationship's passionate growth amidst the chaos of war and its tragic aftermath. During the war, the two meet and become a team; however, when the war ends, Hung is forced from his job and sent to a brutal "re-education camp." The author vividly depicts the betrayal she and a generation of Vietnamese artists and writers experienced after the war and the corruption that gnaws at the heart of the postwar regime. Nina McPherson and Phan Huy Duong also translated Huong's Paradise of the Blind (the first Vietnamese novel to be translated into English and published in the U.S.) and Novel Without a Name.

 

Huraev

Mikhail

Russian

Mikhail Huraev.  Night Patrol and Other Stories.  Duke University Press.  1994.  285 pp.  Paper:  ISBN 0-8223-1415-0.  Though steeped in history, Kuraev's stories pluck from obscurity the little people history ignores─and, in a Soviet Union of Stalin, often crushed.  In the complex "Captain Dikshtein," a fictional account of an incident in 1921 Kronstad, Kuraev evokes life within Soviet military culture and draws a vivid, difficult portrait of one particular life amid the ships and artillery.  In "Night Patrol," a lowly member of the Soviet secret police narrates his evening rounds, interspersing the nightly arrests with reflections on his long career in the KGB.  In "Petya on His Way to the Heavenly Kingdom," set in a construction site for a hydroelectric dam near Murmansk, a soldier's murder of the village simpleton resonates through a small community committed to an enormous and enormously dubious technological project.  Thompson has translated My Life with Bulgakov by Lyubov Belozerskaia and By Right of Memory by Aleksander Tvardovsky.

 

Hussein

Abdullah

Urdu

Abdullah Hussein.  The Weary Generations [Udas Naslein]. Tr. by the author. Peter Owen Ltd./Dufour Editions. 1999 [1963]. 334 pp. Cloth: $36.95; ISBN 0-7206-1062-1. A bestseller on the Indian subcontinent since its publication in 1963, The Weary Generation appears here in English for the first time. This classic novel was the first to fictionalize the struggle of the people of India against the British. Naim, the son of a peasant farmer, loses an arm fighting for the British during the First World War and is decorated for his bravery. But his faith in the Raj has been shattered and upon his return to his village in northern India, he joins the newly formed Congress Party and later the Muslim League, eventually being jailed for his activities. The widespread disillusionment that set in at the time of the Partition is vividly depicted as Naim's youthful idealism and hopes for social harmony are destroyed by the political upheavals experienced by his family and his country. Two books of short fiction by Hussein, Stories of Exile and Alienation and Night and Other Stories, have been translated from the Urdu into English. A novel, emigré journey, was written in English.    

 

Huysmans

Joris-Karl

French

Huysmans, Joris-Karl.  The Damned.  Translated and with an introduction and

notes by Terry Hale.  London: Penguin Books, 2001.  275 pp.  Paper: $8.00.  ISBN 0-14-044767-9.  [-bas, 1891].

 

            The Damned tells the story of Durtal, a shy man who becomes involved in occult activities in the Paris of the late nineteenth-century.  The novel is an almost documentary exploration of the occult, medieval alchemy, and Satanism.

Huysmans work suffered from censorship and condemnation, although it is now considered to be challenging and innovative.  Translator Terry Hale is British Academy Research Fellow in the Performance Translation Centre at the University of Hull.  He holds degrees in Law, Applied Linguistics, and French Literature.  He has published more than a dozen translations, including Great French Detective Stories (1983), The Automatic Muse (1994), and The Dedalus

Book of French Horrow: The Nineteenth Century (1998).  He has also written and lectured extensively on the history and practice of literary translation.

 

Hyder

Qurratulain

Urdu

Qurratulain Hyder. River of Fire [Aag ka Darya]. Transcreated by the author from her Urdu original. New York. New Directions. 1999 [Kali for Women, New Delhi, 1998]. 446 pp. Cloth: $25.95; ISBN 0-8112-1418-4. Now available in English for the first time, this novel was originally published in Urdu in 1959 and is one of the most discussed in contemporary India. The story begins sometime in the 4th century BC, in a cool grotto, where Gautam Nilambar, a student at the forest University of Shravasti, happens upon Hari Shankar, a princeling yearning to be a Buddhist monk. He falls in love with the beautiful, sharp-witted Champak, and thus begins a tale that flows through Time, through Maghadhan Pataliputra, the Kingdom of Oudh, the British Raj, and into a Time of Independence. The tale comes full circle in post-Partition India when modern-day incarnations of the two friends meet in a grotto in the forest of Shravasti and mourn the passing of their lives into meaninglessness. What happens then and now is history. Qurratulain Hyder is one of the leading writers of Urdu fiction in India and is also the translator of the Indian classic The Dancing Girl by Hasan Shah (New Directions, 1993).