Last Name

First Name

Language

Annotation

Saer

Juan José

Spanish

Juan José Saer.  The Event [La Ocasión].  Tr. Helen Lane.  Serpent's Tail/Consortium [Ediciones Destino, S.A., Barcelona, 1988].  1995.  224 pp.  Paper:  $14.99; ISBN 1-85242-249-1.  The Event takes place in London 1855.  Blanco, the magician, is at the height of his powers.  His telepathic gifts have made him famous throughout Europe─the Prussian secret service wants to hire him to divine the secrets of their French counterparts.  At a public meeting held to consecrate his fame, Blanco is undermined by a conspiracy of the Paris positivists.  Exposed as a charlatan, he is forced to flee to the pampas of Argentina where he takes up with Gina, whose voluptuousness matches her promiscuity.  An elegant reflection on the control of knowledge by the first world, The Event won for Saer Spain's prestigious Nadal Prize in 1988.  Helen Lane, winner of the National Book Award, Gulbenkian and PEN Club Translation Prizes, is the translator of Octavio Paz, Luisa Valenzuela, Michel Butor, Mario Vargas-Llosa, Juan Goytisolo as well as Saer.

 

Saer

Juan José

Spanish

Juan José Saer. The Investigation [La Pesquisa]. Tr. Helen Lane. Serpent's Tail. 1999 [Companía Editora Espasa Calpe, Argentina, 1994]. 182 pp. Paperback original: $14.99; ISBN 1-85242-297-1. The Investigation seeks to unravel two cases—one criminal, one literary.  The protagonist is "the monster of the Bastille," so-called for having brutally murdered 27 elderly women in one area of Paris. Meanwhile, an untitled manuscript by an unnamed author is discovered in Argentina among the papers of a missing poet, known for his hatred of the novel. Part police investigation, part historical account, and part novel, The Investigation  shows Juan José Saer to be a virtuosic writer, orchestrating different layers into a Hitchcockian blend of suspense and descriptions of everyday life. Saer is considered by many to be the leading Argentinian writer of the post-Borges generation. His work has been translated into all major languages, including The Witness (1991) and Nothing Nobody Never, both published by Serpent's Tail. Helen Lane has also translated works by Octavio Paz, Luisa Valenzuela, Claude Simon, Mario Vargas-Llosa, and Juan Goytisolo

 

Sahagún

Bernardino De

Nahuatl (Aztec)

Bernardino de Sahagún.  Psalmodia Christiana (Christian Psalmody).  Tr. Arthur J. O. Anderson.  University of Utah Press.  1993.  375 pp.  Cloth:  ISBN 0-87480-373-X.  After the Spanish Conquest of Mexico, some Franciscan friars realized that they must bring Christianity to the natives through their own language.  Sahagún stands at the forefront of understanding traditional native religion through song-dance.  He set out  "putting the new religious message into the same vessels that had made the old religion attractive."  This Psalmodia is a bilingual collection of the rare book of canticles sung in the song-dance ceremonies the natives performed in the churches.

 

Sainte-Beuve

Charles-Augustine

French

Charles-Augustine Sainte-Beuve.  Volupté:  The Sensual Man.  Tr. Marilyn Gaddis Rose.  The State University of New York Press.  1995.  287 pp.  Cloth:  ISBN 0-7914-2451-0.  Paper:  $19.95; ISBN 0-7914-2452-9.  Sainte-Beuve's own fictionalized biography was Volupté, translated here for the first time.  It is at once a roman à clef, a historical novel, and a pre-Freudian psychological novel.  Disguising his relationship with Victor Hugo's wife Adèle by setting the novel in the 1790s during the Breton Chouan uprising against Napoleon, he weaves together fictitious and historical personages.  His analysis of the narrator's inner psychological state and the love-hate language games of courtship is framed by parallel intrigues in politics and society.  Two of Rose's many translations are Axel and Eve of the Future Eden by Villiers d'Isle Adam and Lui: A View of Him by Louise Colet.

 

Šalamun

Tomaž

Slovenian

Tomaž Šalamun. Feast: Poems. Tr. by the poet and Christopher Merrill, Joshua Beckman, Phillis Levin, Andrew Wachtel, Marko Jakše, W. Martin, and Michael Biggins. Ed. Charles Simic. Foreword Edward Hirsch. New York and San Diego. Harcourt. 2000. 112 pp. Cloth: $22.00; ISBN 0-15-100560-5. Tomaž Šalamun is one of the major names in the international avant-garde. Irreverent, self-mythologizing, tragic, and visionary, he is a poet of immense range and cunning, able to encompass everything from Balkan wars and politics to the most intimate personal experiences. Feast, his latest collection of 65 poems in English, brings together both early and more recent work. Šalamun has published 26 books of poetry that have been translated into almost every European language. Works in English include Poker, The Selected Poems of Tomaž Šalamun (1988) and The Four Questions of Melancholy: New and Selected Poems (1997).

 

Sallust

 

Latin

Sallust.  Samuel Johnson's Translation of Sallust:  A Facsimile and Transcription of the Hyde Manuscript.  Eds. David L. Vander Meulen and G. Thomas Tanselle.  The Johnsonians (Bibliographical Society of the University of Virginia).  1993.  40 pp.  Paper:  $25.00; ISBN 1-883631-01-5.  The manuscript reproduced here, with a transcription of its text, contains the only known surviving portion of Samuel Johnson's translation of Sallust's Bellum Catilinae commonly entitled Conspiracy of Catiline. 

 

Salvayre

Lydie

French

Lydie Salvayre.  The Award [La Médaille].  Tr. Jane Davey.  Four Walls Eight Windows [Editions du Seuil, 1993].  1997.  151 pp.  Cloth:  $18.00; ISBN 1-56858-075-4.  A parable of the corporate world, The Award takes place at a ceremony in a massive automobile factory.  One by one, speakers step up to the podium.  A company officer introduces each award recipient with a short speech on his or her merits.  Then, the winner makes a short speech of acceptance.  As the speeches/short stories progress, the reader learns there is a growing chorus of striking workers outside the auditorium who threaten to descend on the proceedings. 

 

Samman

Ghada

Arabic

Ghada Samman. The Square Moon: Supernatural Tales [Al-Qamar Al-Murabba':Qisas Ghara'ibiyya]. Tr. Issa J. Boullata. University of Arkansas Press. 1998 [Manshurat Ghada Al-Samman, Beirut, 1994]. 208 pp. Cloth: $28.00; ISBN 1-55728-534-9. Paper: $16.00; ISBN 1-55728-535-7. Marking collisions of culture and character, these ten short stories arise at the frontiers where Arabic tradition melds with both the modern European world and a Gothic strata of the supernatural. The Square Moon mixes the ghoulish with the everyday, the playful and witty with the terrifying, intermingling surprise endings, uncommon turns of plot, and the strange but realistic details of daily life. Ghada Samman has written thirty-one books, which have been translated into ten languages, including Beirut '75 translated by Nancy N. Roberts, which won the University of Arkansas Press Award for Arabic Literature in Translation. Issa Boullata's translation of The First Well: A Bethlehem Boyhood also won the Arabic translation award in 1995.

 

Samodeva

 

Sanskrit

Samodeva.  Tales from the Kath_sarits_gara.  Tr. Arshia Sattar.  Penguin Books.  1997.  264 pp.  Paper:  $12.95; ISBN 0-14-044698-2.  The Kath_sarits_gara, which literally means the "Ocean of the Sea of Story," is often described as the mother-lode of the world's stories.  The Kath_sarits_gara is said to have been compiled by a Kashmiri Saivite Br_hmin called Somadeva around AD 1070 for Queen S_ryavat_, wife of King Anantadeva who ruled Kashmir.  The stories of this book are retold from 10 of the 18 books of the original.  The main narrative deals with the adventures of Narav_hanadatta and culminates in his eventual coronation as the king of the sky-dwellers with magical powers.  The most remarkable feature of the Kath_sarits_gara is that, unlike other classics of the time, it offers no moral conclusions and is throughout a celebration of earthly life.  Thus, we have promiscuous married women and clever courtesans; imbecile Br_hmins and incompetent kings; and men and women who are cursed and granted boons and experience exciting adventures.

Samona

Carmello

Italian

Carmelo Samona.  Brothers [Fratelli].  Tr. Linda Lappin.  Carcanet [Guilio Einaudi s.p.a., Turin, 1978].  1992.  131 pp.  Cloth:  £13.95; ISBN 0-85635-990-4.  Awarded the Strega Prize.  The narrator of Brothers is his brother's keeper, trying to impose order on the domestic vortex caused by the latter's inadequacies and demands.  He tells the story in order to retain a grip on himself, trying to analyze their relationship in a clinical way, but his account is infected by his brother's problems.  Their relationship of dependence and authority begins to turn:  is he reading and rearranging the written account of their relationship?  Samona published one other novel, Il Custode, before his death in 1990.

 

Samperio

Guillermo

Spanish

Guillermo Samperio.  Beatle Dreams and Other Stories [Antología personal, 1971-1990].  Trs. Russell M. Cluff and L. Howard Quackenbush.  Latin American Literary Review Press [Universidad Veracruzana, 1990].  1994.  169 pp.  Paper:  $15.95; ISBN 0-935480-60-9.  In this playful and sometimes political collection of short stories, Samperio continuously toys with the prejudices and fashionable fetishes of his contemporaries, as exemplified in his "poetic portraits" of women.  Much of his seemingly serious prose is tongue-in-cheek humor, as in "Yurécaro," an initiation story that combines the poetic, the erotic, the rural, and the urban, laced with a youthful, picaresque humor.  Includes works such as "Mystical Serpents," "Lenin and Soccer," "Complicated Woman of the Afternoon," "Gertrudis," "Yellow High-Heeled Shoes," and "A Night for News."  Samperio has won the Casa de las Americas prize and La Palabra y El Hombre.  Cluff and Quackenbush have translated works by Gonzalo Rojas, José Emilio Pacheco, Silvia Molina, and Carlos Montemayor.

 

Sand

George

French

George Sand.  Horace.  Tr. Zack Rogow.  Mercury House.  1995.  352 pp.  Paper: $15.95: ISBN 1-56279-082-X.  Set in Paris during the 1832 student rebellion, Horace interweaves the lives of bohemian students, political rebels, and jaded aristocracy.  Vying for the affections of Marthe, a barmaid and dressmaker, are hard-working artist and handyman Paul Arsène, and the indolent student and would-be writer Horace Dumonet.  Théophile, a medical student (and Sand's alter ego), recounts the story of how the witty Horace wins Marthe but proceeds to make their life together miserable.  When Marthe becomes pregnant, Horace fails to rise to the occasion and Marthe runs away.  Horace retreats from his pledge to join the revolutionary Jean Laravinière in the 1832 student revolt and, instead, flees Paris, trying to duck dishonor by claiming his mother is ill.  He joins Théophile and his grisette, Eugénie, near the Chailly Chateau and enters a dangerous liaison with the Viscountess, Madame de Chailly.  Meanwhile, Paul, wounded in battle, stumbles upon Marthe with her newborn.  After extreme poverty, Marthe becomes a successful actress and, no longer dependent on Paul's charity, can now accept him as her mate and equal.  Translator Zack Rogow won the 1994 PEN/Book-of-the-Month Translation Prize for his co-translation of André Breton's Earthlight. 

 

Sand

George

French

George Sand. The Marquise & Pauline. Tr. Sylvie Charron and Sue Huseman. Intro. Sylvie Charron. Chicago. Academy Chicago Publishers. 1999. 200 pp. Cloth: $23.00; ISBN 0-89733-449-3. Amadine Aurore Lucie Dupin (George Sand) was born in Paris in 1804 to a working-class mother and an aristocratic father. When she was five years old, she went to live with her grandmother Dupin on the family estate at Nohant. Married to Casimir Dudevant when she was 18, she and her husband admitted to a mutual and irrevocable antipathy nine years (and three children) later. Aurore moved to Paris to begin a literary career, where her first book, Rose et Blanche, was written in collaboration with Jules Sandreau and signed "Jules Sand." Thereafter, she wrote continuously under the name "George Sand"—novels, journalism, essays, memoirs, stories, and plays. Everything she experienced or imagined went into her writing, which shocked English and American readers especially by describing fully and frankly the emotional turmoils of its female characters. These two works were both conceived in 1832, although Pauline was not published until 1839. Now available in English for the first time, these novellas will attract even more new readers to Sand's growing library of freshly translated works. 

 

Sanguinetti

Edoardo

Italian

Edoardo Sanguineti. Libretto [Libretto]. Tr. Pádraig J. Daly. Dedalus Press/Dufour Editions. 1998. 40 pp. Paper: $14.95; ISBN 1-901 233-20-0. Poetry Europe Series No. 5. Bilingual. Edoardo Sanguineti is one of the most important poets of the neo-vanguard movement in Italy. His poems capture the anguish, the wit, and the need for human love at this moment of world-wide millennial chaos. Sanguineti's exploitation of the music of the Italian language has made the composer Luciano Berio do settings of many of his poems. This is the first Sanguineti book in English translation, possibly due to the author's proclivity for word play, puns, jokes, and inventive juxtapositioning. Pádraig J. Daly accepted the difficult task of translating Libretto because the book excited him, because he finds Sanguineti's poetry so life-affirming, and because he believes that even the poorest translation may lead people to read more of him. A formal note: the seventeen poems in this volume are printed vertically, with the unusually long lines of each verse running up-and-down, rather than across, the page.

 

Santanello

Manlio

Italian

Manlio Santanello. Emergency Exit: A Play in Two Acts [Uscita di emergenza]. Tr. Anthony Molino and Jane House. Riverside, Ca. Xenos Books. 2000. 119 pp. Paper: $13.00; ISBN 1-879378-40-X. The action of Emergency Exit takes place in a place where there should be no action—two squatters in an abandoned house in Naples wage psychological war on one another as the house, shaken by earthquakes, teeters on the brink of collapse. Thus unfolds a play of comic desolation that is reminiscent of Beckett's Waiting for Godot, Pinter's The Caretaker, and Albee's Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? with the addition of a distinct Neopolitan flavor. Emergency Exit won Italy's IDI Award for Best Play, which is the equivalent of our Tony Award, was named Best Play by the Italian Association of Theater Critics, and is here translated into English for the first time. Anthony Molino has previously translated Antonio Porta's Dreams and Other Infidelities (Xenos, 1999). Jane House has performed in theater, film, and television, and translates from French and Italian.

 

Santareno

Bernardo

Portuguese

Bernardo Santareno.  The Judgment of Father Martinho [A Traição do Padre Martinho].  Tr. Celso Lemos de Oliveira.  Gávea-Brown [Luiz Francisco Rebello].  1994.  134 pp.  Paper:  ISBN 0-943722-19-5.  The Judgment of Father Martinho, an epic drama in the Brechtian tradition, pits a village priest and his parishioners, factory laborers and peasants, against the forces of capital, feudalism, and the Church hierarchy.  The play was censored in Portugal in 1969 and was first performed in Cuba.  Santareno wrote this play during the early years of the liberation theology movement; his sociopolitical criticism and ultimate optimism are timely today.  Lemos de Oliveira's works include Understanding Graciliano Ramos (1988) and a translation of Graciliano Ramos's Childhood (1979). 

 

Santiago

Silviano

Portuguese

Silviano Santiago.  Stella Manhattan.  Tr. George Yúdice.  Duke University Press.  1994.  212 pp.  Paper:  ISBN 0-8223-1498-3.  Twice the winner of the Brazilian national book award, Santiago caused a sensation in 1985 with the publication of this story of sexual scandal and political intrigue.  Set in the Brazilian exile community in New York City in the late 1960s, this noir novel is an electrifying adventure story of a young gay Brazilian man trying to survive in New York.  Working through two complex themes─politics and sex─Santiago emphasizes the interaction of the seemingly contradictory impulses of liberation and Americanization that Brazil underwent in the late 1960s.  Exploring the complexities of repression that affect all forms of identity, Santiago mingles tragedy and farce as international intrigues are played out in New York's Latino and black neighborhoods, and the genteel world of international diplomacy is thrust into the milieu of urban gay street life.

 

Sappho

 

Greek

(Ancient)  Sappho.  Poems.  Tr. Willis Barnstone.  Sun & Moon Classics.  1998.  143 pp.  Paper:  $10.95; ISBN 1-55713-358-1.  Barnstone reintroduces the reader to Sappho's spare and intense line.  Among the more than 100 poems presented here are:  "Supreme Sight on the Black Earth," "Brightness in Time of Storm," "About My Brother's Lover," "Her Rival's Pedigree," "Pigeons Playing Dead," "On Fabrics from the Island of Amorgos," "Cicada," "Rules of Love," and "Sappho I Loved You."  Barnstone also translated The Cosmic Fragments of Heraclitus, Greek Lyric Poetry, and a literary version of the New Testament.

 

Sappho

 

Greek

The Love Songs of Sappho. Tr. with essay by Paul Roche. Intro. Page du Bois. Prometheus Books. 1998. 251 pp. Paper: $8.95; ISBN 1-57392-251-X. Literary Classics. Called the “Tenth Muse” by the ancients, Greece’s greatest female lyric poet, Sappho, spent the majority of her life on the island of Lesbos. Passionate and breathtaking, Sappho’s poems survive only in fragments following religiously biased and homophobic conspiracies to silence her. Sappho penned immortal verse on the intense power of female love, on the themes of romance, yearning, heartbreak, and personal relationships with women. This work retains the standard numerical order of the fragments and has been arranged into six sections. Paul Roche’s translation is enhanced by an essay “Portrait of Sappho,” as well as by a lucid historical introduction by celebrated feminist and classicist Page du Bois. In his Translator’s Preface, Roche explains that he did his best to get near not only to what Sappho said but the way she said it. "I have tried to catch the penumbra of her spontaneity, the sharpness and jewelry of sound. Of course, this is only an illusion. When a poetry is stripped of its original music, a completely new set of sounds and rhythms has to be found. It is not that English is inferior to Greek for the expression of feelings and concepts, but that it is different.”

 

Sappho Says. . .: Poems and Fragments of Sappho of Lesbos. Tr. Frank Salvidio. Ibis Books. 1999. 67 pp. Paper: $7.50; ISBN 0-935140-01-8. For over 2,500 years, western poets have imitated and echoed Sappho of Lesbos. Byron called her "burning Sappho," and borrowed from her, as did Hardy and Housman. Catullus paraphrased her in passionate Latin verses addressed to the woman he called Lesbia, in her honor. Dante, who did not know Greek but did know Latin, sublimated Catullus's lines in the greatest sonnet of the Vita Nuova. And Swinburne both celebrated and imitated her in his "Sapphics." Among western poets, only Homer has lasted longer, even though Sappho's works have been banned and burned more often than those of any other writer in history. In his Introduction, Frank Salvidio addresses the problem of recreating the musicality of the classical Greek verses within the naturalness of ordinary English speech by incorporating occasional alliteration and an irregular iambic beat. Salvidio is the author of Between Troy & Florence, a collection of original poems and translations (Bloodaxe Books), and a translation of Dante's Vita Nuova (Aegina Press).

 

Saramago

José

Portuguese

José Saramago. All the Names [Todos os Nomes]. Tr. Margaret Jull Costa. Harcourt. 2000 [Editorial Caminho SA, 1997]. 256 pp. Cloth: $24.00; ISBN 0-15-100421-8. All the Names is the eighth work of fiction by the writer who became an "overnight" literary sensation after winning the Nobel Prize two years ago. Through the character of Senhor Jose, a lonely clerk in the Central Registry of Births, Marriages, and Deaths who becomes obsessed with the record of an unknown woman, Saramago once again creates a timeless story of love and the effects of chance on our lives. His other fiction titles in English translation are all published by Harcourt, most recently The Tale of the Unknown Island (1999), Blindness (1998), The History of the Siege of Lisbon (1997), and The Stone Raft (1995). For her translation of All the Names, Margaret Jull Costa recently won the 1999 Weidenfeld Translation Prize.

 

Saramago

José

Portuguese

José Saramago. Blindness [Ensaio sobre a Cegueira]. Tr. Giovanni Pontiero. Harvest Book/Harcourt Brace & Co. 1999 [Harvill, Great Britain, 1997]. 352 pp. Cloth: ISBN 0-15-100251-7. Paper: $14.00; ISBN 0-15-600775-4. Written by the winner of the 1998 Nobel Prize for Literature, Blindness is the suspenseful story of a city hit by an epidemic of sudden “white blindness,” a mysterious malady that causes no color or shape other than white to be perceived. As the malady spreads, authorities confine the newly blind in an abandoned mental hospital secured by armed guards, while inside, the criminal element among the blind holds the rest captive. The compound is set ablaze and the blind escape into what is now a deserted city strewn with unburied corpses. A thought-provoking parable of loss and disorientation that vividly evokes the horrors of living in the 20th century, Blindness portrays humanity’s worst appetites and weaknesses as well as, ultimately, the indominability of the human spirit. Other novels by Saramago available in English translation include Balthasar and Blimunda, The Year of the Death of Ricardo Reis, The Gospel According to Jesus Christ, The Stone Raft, The History of the Siege of Lisbon, and The Tale of the Unknown Island, all published by Harcourt Brace. Following the death of Giovanni Pontiero before completing this work, his translation was finalized by Margaret Jull Costa.   

 

Sarduy

Savero

Spanish

Severo Sarduy. From Cuba with a Song [De dónde son los cantantes]. Tr. Suzanne Jill Levine.  Sun & Moon Press [Joaquín Mortiz, Mexico, 1967].  1994.  162 pp.  Paper: $10.95; ISBN: 1-55713-158-9.  Divided into three sections--each corresponding to the ethnic groups that make up Cuban nationality:  Spanish, African, and Chinese--Sarduy's first truly experimental work explores the disparate elements at work in Latin American culture through the tropes of transvestitism, carnival, violence, and fantasy. 

Sarduy

Severo

Spanish

Severo Sarduy.  Cobra and Maitreya.  Tr. Suzanne Jill Levine.  Dalkey Archive Press.  1995.  273 pp.  Paper:  $13.95; ISBN 1-56478-076-7.  Cobra recounts the tale of a transvestite named Cobra, star of the Lyrical Theater of Dolls, whose obsession is to transform his/her body.  She is assisted in her metamorphosis by the Madam and Pup, Cobra's dwarfish double.  They too change shape, through the violent ceremonies of a motorcycle gang, into a sect of Tibetan lamas seeking to revive Tantric Buddhism.  Maitreya continues the theme of metamorphosis, this time in the person of Luis Leng, a humble Cuban Chinese cook, who becomes a reincarnation of Buddha.  Through Leng, Sarduy traces the metamorphosis of two hitherto incomparable societies, Tibet at the moment of Chinese invasion, and Cuba at the moment of revolution.  Translator Levine is the author of The Subversive Scribe:  Translating Latin American Fiction. 

 

Sarsini

Monica

Italian

Monica Sarsini. Eruptions. Tr. and intro. Maryann De Julio. New York. Italica Press. 1999. 82 pp. Paper: $12.00; ISBN 0-934977-68-2. Eruptions is a collection of short fiction by Monica Sarsini, a contemporary writer and multimedia artist from Florence. The book comprises selected translations from two of Sarsini's works: Crepacuore, her 1985 work on colors, and Crepapelle, her 1988 work on the senses which was the basis for a series of short narrative pieces in New Italian Women that introduced Sarsini to American readers. All of these pieces are sensual explorations in Sarsini's experimental, yet concrete narrative style and important introductions to the wide variety of recent Italian fiction. Maryann De Julio writes in her Introduction that although her aim was to make this translation of Monica Sarsini's work simpatica (à la Lawrence Venuti's 1991 essay), "there remains intact in her narratves an inevitable specificity that the American reader will experience as foreign."

 

Schaechter-Gotetsman

Beyle

Yiddish

Beyle Schaechter-Gottesman.  Lider.  Trs. Thomas E. Bird, Itzik Gottesman, Seymour Levitan, Gabriel Preil, Mindy Rinkewich, Elinor Robinson, Charne Schaechter, Jeffrey Shandler.  Cross-Cultural Communications.  1995.  48 pp.  Paper:  $7.50; ISBN 0-89304-170-X.  Bilingual.  Yiddish Writers 1.  Among the 21 translations included are "Those Moments," "Houses in the Bronx," "Window of My Night," "Halftones," "In the Mists of an Empty Sunday," and "Yes Men."

 

Schami

Rafik

German

Rafik Schami.  Damascus Nights [Erzähler der Nacht].  Tr. Philip Boehm.  Farrar, Straus and Giroux [Beltz Verlag, 1989].  1993.  263 pp.  Cloth:  $20.00; ISBN 0-374-13446-4.  Once upon a time, it happens that Salim the coachman, the most famous storyteller in all of Damascus, is mysteriously struck dumb.  To break the spell, seven friends gather for seven nights to present Salim with seven wondrous "gifts," seven stories of their own invention.

 

Scharang

Michael

German

Michael Scharang. Charlie Tractor and Harry, A Reckoning. Tr. with afterword Daniel Slager. Riverside, CA. Ariadne Press. 2001 [1973 and 1984 respectively]. 186 pp. Paper: $19.50; ISBN 1-57241-066-3. Studies in Austrian Literature, Culture, and Thought. Translation Series. This volume contains two works of fiction which can be read independently, yet are inherently connected. Charlie Tractor, the author's first novel, traces the trying and sometimes hilarious experiences of a young working class protagonist who has recently moved from the Austrian provinces to Vienna. Much of the novel consists of an account of Charlie's efforts to organize and present his and his co-workers' demands for improved working conditions. The novel also engages questions concerning Austria's post-war history, and the legacy of Nazism in Austria. In Harry, A Reckoning, Charlie Tractor's son, Harry, delivers a monologue to the author of the novel based on his father's experiences. The work contains, among other things, a reconsideration of changing historical conditions in Austria, and the role of literature in this context. Both works are simultaneously funny and seriously engaged. Michael Scharang's previous works include novels, short prose, radio plays, films, and essays.

 

Schlag

Evelyn

German

Evelyn Schlag.  Quotations of a Body [Die Kränkung].  Tr. Willy Riemer.  Ariadne Press [S. Fischer Verlag, 1987].  1998.  211 pp.  Paper:  $19.95; ISBN 0-57241-050-7.  In Quotations the reader encounters the shadowy presence of Katherine Mansfield as Schlag probes the day-to-day experiences of women.  Women with resilience and subtle irony, women who endure the projects and large visions of men, women who are made invisible by their association with such men.

 

Schmidt

Arno

German

Arno Schmidt.  Collected Novellas:  Collected Early Fiction 1949-1964, Volume 1.  Tr. John E. Woods.  Dalkey Archive Press.  1994.  432 pp.  Cloth:  $22.95; ISBN 1-56478-066-X.  1994 ALTA Outstanding Translation Award Winner.  This is the first in a four-volume edition of the early fiction of one of the most daring and influential writers of postwar Germany.  The novella was Schmidt's preferred form at the beginning of his writing career, and this volume collects ten novellas he wrote between Enthymesis (1949) and Republica Intelligentsia (1957), most of them appearing here in English for the first time.  Includes such works as "Leviathan," "The Displaced," "Cosmas," "Lake Scenery with Pocahontas," and "Gadir."  Woods won both the 1981 American Book Award and PEN award for his translation of Schmidt's Evening Edged in Gold and recently published a new translation of Thomas Mann's Buddenbrooks. 

 

Schnitzler

Arthur

German

Arthur Schnitzler.  Paracelsus and Other One-Act Plays.  Tr. G. J. Weinberger.  Ariadne Press.  1995.  220 pp.  Paper:  ISBN 0-929497-96-1.  The works in this volume, several appearing for the first time in English translation, deal with some of Schnitzler's favorite themes.  "The Green Cockatoo" intermingles illusion and reality.  "Paracelsus" introduces an "All the world's a stage" flavor and combines it with an interest in hypnotism.  Other plays have as a motif the tendency of some humans to treat others as mere playthings, or puppets.  Weinberger's previous translations include Schnitzler's Frau Berta Garlan, as well as Three Late Plays (The Sisters or Casanova in Spa, Seduction Comedy, The Way to the Pond) and Professor Bernhardi and Other Plays. 

 

Schnitzler

Arthur

German

Arthur Schnitzler. Dream Story [Traumnovelle]. Tr. J. M. O. Davies. Warner Books. 1999 [1926]. 281 pp. Paper: $12.99; ISBN 0-446-67632-2. Austrian dramatist and novelist Arthur Schnitzler's novella, Dream Story, which is the basis for Stanley Kubrick's controversial final film, Eyes Wide Shut, appears here in a new English translation. Also included in the volume is the screenplay written by Kubrick and Frederick Raphael, and a 16-page insert of black and white stills from the movie. Dream Story is a sensual tale that explores the subconscious, forbidden desires of a husband and wife, in both their dreams and fantasies and in their increasingly daring sexual adventures. Ahead of its time and marked by the deep influence of the author's contemporary, Sigmund Freud, Schnitzler's work has become a modernist classic. The original story's themes of depravity and the elusive ambiguity of dream and reality can be compared to Kubrick's own transforming vision in the film that culminates his illustrious career.

 

Schoenberg

Arnold

German

Arnold Schoenberg.  Coherence, Counterpoint, Instrumentation, Instruction in Form [Zusammenhang, Kontrapunkt, Instrumentation, Formenlehre].  Ed. Severine Neff.  Trs. Charlotte M. Cross and Severine Neff.  University of Nebraska Press.  1994.  135 pp.  Cloth:  ISBN 0-8032-4230-1.  Bilingual.  Only Stravinsky can claim as much credit as Schoenberg for the most dramatic innovations in 20th-century music.  Inventor of the 12-tone row, explorer of atonality and the hexachord, composer of tone poems, songs, and chamber music, and chief spokesman for the Vienna Circle, Schoenberg has become ever more influential as his successors have come to understand him.  This volume collects four short works, each concentrated on a key issue in composition.  Written in 1917, but altered and augmented many times in later years, the manuscripts edited and translated in the volume have never been published before.

 

Schulze

Ingo

German

Ingo Schulze. Simple Stories: A Novel from the East German Provinces [Simple Storys]. Tr. John E. Woods. New York. A Borzoi Book by Alfred A. Knopf. 2000 [Berlin Verlag, 1998]. 280 pp. Cloth: $25.00; ISBN 0-375-40541-0. From the author of the prize-winning 33 Moments of Happiness, Simple Stories is a heartbreaking and funny first novel about the people in a deadbeat little town in East Germany who make us understand, as nothing else, what life has been like since the fall of the Berlin Wall. Gradually revealed in the minutiae of their daily experiences is the collapse of an entire world and the dramatic fault line that has run through so many East German lives since 1990.  Schulze moves back and forth through the town, cross-cutting events and lives cinematically and allowing their elements to reassemble. By the time the last story ends, Schulze has woven a remarkable  tragicomic tapestry of ordinary people caught up in the last great historical cataclysm of our time.

 

Schutting

Julian

German

Julian Schutting. The Morning Before the Journey [Am Morgen vor der Reise]. Tr. and afterword Barbara Zeisl Schoenberg. Riverside, CA. Ariadne Press. 1999 [Residenz Verlag, Salzburg, 1978]. 120 pp. Paper: $14.50; ISBN 1-57241-071-X. Paperback original. The Morning Before the Journey sketches everyday Austrian life as seen through the protective, rose-colored glasses of imaginary childhood siblings. Judith and Stephan's musings encompass a variety of subjects ranging from humorous, critical, and at times melancholy school and after-school experiences, to word-games and playfulness with language, to critical appraisals of art and unavoidably, to threatening, gruesome scenes suggesting lewdness, brutality, violence, and death. This is the first of Julian Schutting's works to be translated into English. Other translations by Barbara Zeisl Schoenberg include Hollywood Haven: Homes and Haunts of the European Emigres and Exiles in Los Angeles by Cornelius Schnauber (Ariadne, 1997) and the 1912 Festschrift included in the volume Schoenberg and His World, edited by Walter Frisch (Princeton University Press, 1999).

 

Scliar

Moacyr

Portuguese

Moacyr Scliar. The Collected Stories of Moacyr Scliar. Tr. Eloah F. Giacomelli. Intro. Ilan Stavans. University of New Mexico Press. 1999. 475 pp. Cloth: $45.00; ISBN 0-8263-1911-4. Paper: $19.95; ISBN 0-8263-1912-2. Jewish Latin America series. Moacyr Scliar is Brazil's most distinguished writer. Although his works have been translated into many languages, none of the stories in this volume is currently available in English, and many have never been translated into English before. This anthology is a compilation of six collections: The Carnival of the Animals (1968); The Ballad of the False Messiah (1976); The Tremulous Earth (1977); The Dwarf in the Television Set (1979); The Enigmatic Eye (1986); and Van Gogh's Ear (1989).

 

Scorza

Manuel

Spanish

Manuel Scorza. The Ballad of Agapito Robles [Cantar de Agapito Robles]. Tr. Anna-Marie Aldaz. Peter Lang. 1999 [Monte Avila Editores, Caracas, Venuzuela, 1976]. 175 pp. Cloth: $44.95; ISBN 0-8204-4174-0. Wor(l)ds of Change 41. In this, the fourth volume in his chronicle, "La guerra silenciosa," Manuel Scorza describes the increasingly militant stance taken by the dispossessed Indian peasants of Peru in their struggle to regain their ancestral lands. Agapito Robles carries out the mission entrusted to him at the end of the preceding novel, The Sleepless Rider; namely, to encourage his fellow Indians to intensify their fight to bring down their archenemy, Judge Francisco Montenegro. The judge's defeat awakens the Indians to reality and initiates a process of demythification that is the focus of the chronicle's fifth and final volume, Requiem for a Lightning Bolt. Anne-Marie Aldaz has written a book-length translation of Rosalía de Castro's poetry, and translations of two of Scorza's previous novels, Garabombo, the Invisible (1994) and The Sleepless Rider (1996), both published by Peter Lang.

Scotellaro

Rocco

Italian

Rocco Scotellaro.  The Garden of the Poor.  Trs. Ruth Feldman and Brian Swann.  Cross-Cultural Communications.  1993.  48 pp.  Paper:  $5.00; ISSN 0271-6070.  Bilingual.  Italian Heritage Chapbook 1.  Collection of such poems as "The Catherine Wheels," "At Peace with My Dead,"  "The Grain of the Sepulchre," "Octopuses," and "The Friar's Boundary Wall."

 

Sebald

W.G.

German

W. G. Sebald.  The Emigrants [Die Ausgewanderten].  Tr. Michael Hulse.  New Directions [Vito von Eichborn GmbH & Co. Verlag KG, Frankfurt am Main, 1993].  1996.  276 pp.  Cloth:  $22.95; ISBN 0-8112-1338-2.  Part fiction, part historical fact, The Emigrants is composed of four long narratives which at first appear to be the straightforward accounts of the lives of several Jewish exiles in England, Austria, and America.  The narrator literally follows their footsteps, studding each story with actual photographs and creating the impression that the reader is poring over a family album.  But gradually, Sebald's prose, which combines documentary description with almost hallucinatory fiction, exerts a new magic, and the four stories merge into one overwhelming evocation of exile and loss.

 

Sebald

W.G.

German

W. G. Sebald.  The Rings of Saturn [Die Ringe des Saturn, Eine englische Wallfahrt].  Tr. Michael Hulse.  New Directions [Vito von Eichborn GmbH & Co Verlag KG, 1995].  1998.  256 pp.  Cloth:  $23.95; ISBN 0-8112-1378-1.  A fictional account of a walking tour through England's East Anglia, The Rings of Saturn explores Britain's pastoral and imperial past.  As the narrator walks, a company of ghosts keeps him company--Thomas Browne, Swinburne, Chateaubriand,  Joseph Conrad, Borges--conductors between the past and present.  The narrator meets lonely eccentrics inhabiting tumble-down mansions and hears of furious coastal battles of two world wars.  He tells of far-off China and the introduction of the silk industry to Norwich.  He walks to the now forsaken harbor where Conrad first set foot on English soil and visits the site of the once-great city of Dunwich, now sunk in the sea, all the while blending history and fiction.  Sebald has won the Berlin Literature, Literatur Nord, and Mörike Prizes, as well as the Johannes Bobrowski medal.  He wrote The Emigrants (New Directions, 1996), and Vertigo is forthcoming from New Directions in 1999.

 

Sebald

W.G.

German

W. G. Sebald. Vertigo [Schwindel. Gefühle]. Tr. Michael Hulse. New York. New Directions. 2000 [Vito von Eichborn GmbH & Co Verlag, Frankfurt am Main, 1990]. 224 pp. Cloth: $23.95; ISBN 0-8112-1430-3. German expatriate W. G. Sebald's first novel, Vertigo is a highly sophisticated and urban work, typified by a rare sense of humor, delighting in fictional patterns of the most dizzying kind, and never before translated into English. Vertigo also tells a profoundly moving story of lost love, sickness, death, and the making of memories. Line by line, the reader is lured into an almost inescapable maze as the text employs devices and modes of biographical and autobiographical writing, of travelogue, thriller fiction, case history, childhood reminiscences, legend and horror story. Other works by Sebald available in English from New Directions include The Emigrants (1996) and The Rings of Saturn (1998).

 

Sebbar

Leïla

French

Leïla Sebbar. Sherazade [Shérazade, 17ans, brune, frisée, les yeux verts]. Tr. Dorothy S. Blair. London. Quartet Books Limited. 1999 [Editions Stock, 1982; Quartet, 1991]. U. S. Distributor: Interlink. 304 pp. Paper: $13.95; ISBN 0-7043-8125-7. Sherazade is 17 years of age, Algerian, and a runaway in Paris. This novel exposes with honesty and lyricism the various issues that affect a young woman living in a city which is both sophisticated and provincial, liberal and conservative, tolerant and prejudiced. It is the powerful account of a young woman who is haunted by her Algerian past and caught between different worlds—Africa and Europe, her parents' and her own, colony and capital. Ultimately, Sherazade is the story of possession, identity, and the realities of urban life in the late 20th century. In addition to her own works of criticism, Dorothy S. Blair has published many translations of books written in French by African women, concentrating on writers from the Mahgreb. 

 

Seifert

Jaroslav

Czech

Jaroslav Seifert.  The Early Poetry of Jaroslav Seifert.  Tr. Dana Loewy.  Northwestern University Press.  1997.  221 pp.  Cloth:  $25.00; ISBN 0-8101-1383-X.  This collection contains more than 100 poems from City in Tears, Sheer Love, On the Waves of TSF, and The Nightingale Sings Poorly.  Seifert's poetry is strongly situated within the Czech literary tradition of Poetism, which evolved into a playful, lighthearted refuge from world history while maintaining an edge of social consciousness.  The playfulness of Seifert's early poetry expresses itself in anecdotes and witty aphorisms, and relies importantly on such sound patterns as alliteration, assonance, and euphony. 

Selimovi

Meši

Russian

Meša Selimovi_.  Death and the Dervish [Derviš i smrt].  Tr. Bogdan Raki_ and Stephen M. Dickey.  Northwestern University Press.  1996.  480 pp.  Cloth: $39.95; ISBN 0-8101-1296-5.  Paper:  $15.95; ISBN 0-8101-1297-3.  Death and the Dervish is a first-person narrative told from the point of view of Sheikh Nuruddin, a dervish at a Sarajevo monastery in the 18th century during the Turkish occupation.  The spiritual leaders of a group of Moslems, Sheikh Nuruddin has deliberately removed himself from the day-to-day activities of society.  This distance is shattered, though, by the arrest of his brother.  As Sheikh Nuruddin attempts to find out what has happened to his brother and to intervene on his behalf, he is drawn into the Kafkaesque world of Turkish authorities.  As he does so, he begins to question his relations with society as a whole and his life choices in general.  Raki_ is a visiting assistant professor in the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures at Indiana University.

 

Selimovic

Meša

Serbo-Croatian

Meša Selimovic. The Fortress. [Tvrdjava]. Tr. E. D. Goy and Jasna Levinger. Northwestern University Press. 1999 [1970]. 406 pp. Cloth: $59.95; ISBN 0-8101-1712-6. Paper: $19.95; ISBN 0-8101-1713-4. Writings from an Unbound Europe. The Fortress is one of the most significant novels to come out of the former Yugoslavia. Profound in its understanding and re-creation of Bosnian history and the cultural undercurrents of its narrative and psychological self-reflection, Meša Selimovic's novel is also an exploration of the universal forces of human nature, morality, and society. Selimovic's subtle and complex characterization, his vivid evocation of the political and social framework of a historical moment and its associations with modern Yugoslavian history, and the insight of his moral and philosophical explorations all contribute to the book's dark power. Selimovic's novel Death and the Dervish was published by Northwestern in 1996.

Sencion

Viriato

Spanish

Viriato Sención.  They Forged the Signature of God [Los que falsificaron la firma de Dios].  Tr. Asa Zatz.  Curbstone Press/Consortium Book Sales.  1995.  250 pp.  Paper:  $14.95; ISBN 1-880684-33-0.  Winner of the Dominican Republic's National Fiction Award for 1993 and the nation's all-time best seller, They Forged the Signature of God exposes the collaboration between Church and State to maintain the Dominican people under the control of a dictatorial regime.  Sención's novel follows the lives of three seminary students who suffer church-state oppression.  Two of them are ultimately murdered while the third makes his accommodation with the government.  The book also gives a chilling portrait of Dr. Ramos, a sinister autocrat, who comes to power following the assassination of the dictator Tirano and through manipulation and tyranny survives six terms as president of his country.

 

Seneca

Lucius Annaeus

Latin

Lucius Annaeus Seneca.  Seneca:  The Tragedies, Volume 2.  Ed. David R. Slavitt.  The Johns Hopkins University Press.  1995.  261 pp.  Cloth:  $45.00; ISBN 0-8018-4931-4.  Paper:  $15.95; ISBN 0-8018-4932-2.  Seneca confronts the irrationality and cruelty of his world─the Rome of Caligula, Claudius, and Nero─and his art reflects the stress of the encounter.  Slavitt brings together a second group of Seneca's extant tragedies, including Oedipus (tr. Rachel Hadas), Hercules Furens (tr. Dana Gioia), Hercules Oetaeus (tr. Stephen Sandy), Octavia (tr. Kelly Cherry), and The Phoenician Women (tr. David R. Slavitt). 

 

Seneca

 

Latin

Seneca.  Dialogues and Letters.  Ed. and Tr. C. D. N. Costa.  Penguin Books.  1997.  132 pp.  Paper:  $12.95; ISBN 0-14-044679-6.  This selection includes the Consolation to Helvia, written to Seneca's mother from exile in Corsica, in which he tenderly tries to soothe the pain of separation, and the dialogues On the Shortness of Life  and On Tranquillity of Mind, which, like the letters about fortitude and self-reliance, are classic statements of Stoic ideals.  Extracts from the Natural Questions reveal a passionate and informed interest in phenomena such as earthquakes. 

Sepúlveda-Pulvirenti

Emma

Spanish

Emma Sepúlveda-Pulvirenti.  Death to Silence/Muerte al silencio.  Tr. Shaun T. Griffin.  Arte Público Press.  1997.  97 pp.  Paper:  $8.95; ISBN 1-55885-203-4.  Bilingual.  The terror and beauty that color this collection of spare and evocative poetry bear witness to the disquieting circumstances that inspired the poet, who fled Chile when the military junta led by Pinochet came to power in 1973.  Among the almost three dozen poems are "You Cannot Listen to Death/Ya no se oye en la muerte," "To Your Blind Eyes/A tus ojos ciegos," "The Last Prayer of September/El último rezo de septiembre," and "If I Renounce the Word/Si reunucio a la palabra." 

Sepúlvida

Luis

Spanish

Luis Sepúlveda.  The Old Man Who Read Love Stories [El viejo que leía novelas de amor].  Tr. Peter Bush.  Harcourt Brace & Company.  1994.  131 pp.  Cloth:  $14.95; ISBN 0-15-168550-9.  1994 ALTA Outstanding Translation Award Winner.  An old man lives in a hut in El Idilio, a village on the Nangaritza River, in the southeast corner of Ecuador.  The village is so small, the dentist comes only twice a year, to pull teeth and bring books to the old man─love stories, with gliding gondolas and ardent kisses, the kind that guarantee maximum heartache.  This is a story of the jungle, green hell and Eden; of the Shuar Indians, who know how to live in harmony with it; of the machines and settlers and gold prospectors and gringos who have invaded it.  Nature, out of balance, becomes vengeful and violent.  An ocelot stalks the village, and only the old man, who once lived with the Indians and knows the jungle, is able to face the animal.

 

Sereni

Vittorio

Italian

Vittorio Sereni. Variable Star [Stella Variabile]. Ed. and tr. Luigi Bonaffini. Afterword Laura Baffoni Licata. Guernica. 1999 [Garzanti Editore, 1981]. 84 pp. Paper: $13.00; ISBN 1-55071-087-7. Essential Poets Series 89. Vittorio Sereni's last book of verse and one containing, as the author himself underlined, perhaps his best poetry, was first published in 1981. That same year, it won the Viareggio Award for poetry. Answering a question on the meaning of the title, Sereni observed, "It has an allusive value, . . . but it is better for each individual to look for a meaning." The book's discourse centers on "variations" of a few fundamental themes, the most predominant being the theme of death. Laura Baffoni Licata explains that these constant thoughts of death are "counterbalanced, in an almost oscillatory movement of lights and shadows, by inventive—I would say solar— outbursts, attesting on the one hand to a vitalistic energy very much present in the poet, and on the other the great transfigurating power of this poetry."

 

Serrao

Achille

Italian

Achille Serrao.  The Crevice ['A Canniatura].  Ed. and Tr. Luigi Bonaffini.  Peter Lang Publishing, Inc.  1995. 106 pp.  Cloth:  ISBN 0-8204-2517-6.  Bilingual.  Serrao, who writes in the dialect of Caivano, a small town in Campania, in this book deals with his own "anxiety of influence" vis-a-vis the great melodic tradition of Neapolitan poetry by reclaiming instead another, anti-melodic, anti-subjective legacy, from Basile to Capurro to Russo.  The result is a poetry of striking originality and power, in which the painful incomprehensibility of life is affirmed with a language that can be sharp and refractory, yet subtle and elegant, confirming Serrao's position as one of Italy's foremost neo-dialect poets.  Bonaffini has translated Dino Campana (Orphic Songs and Other Poems:  Peter Lang, 1992); Mario Luzi (For the Baptism of Our Fragments:  Guernica, 1992); Giose Rimanelli (Moliseide:  Peter Lang, 1991); Guiseppe Jovine (The Peacock and The Scraper:  Peter Lang, 1994). 

 

Serrao

Achille

Italian

Achille Serrao. Cantalèsia: Poems in the Neapolitan Dialect 1990-1997. Ed. and tr. Luigi Bonaffini. Brooklyn. Legas. 1999. 156 pp. Paper: ISBN 1-881901-19-X. Italian Poetry in Translation 5. Bilingual. Achille Serrao, who writes in the dialect of Caivano, a small town in Campania, deals with his own "anxiety of influence" vis-à-vis the great melodic tradition of Neapolitan poetry, by reclaiming another, anti-melodic, anti-subjective legacy, from Basile to Capurro to Russo. The result is poetry of striking originality and power, in which the incomprehensibility of life is affirmed with a language that can be sharp and refractory, yet subtle and elegant. In addition to writing poetry, Serrao has translated into the Campania dialect poems by Catullus and G. G. Belli and is currently preparing a critical edition of La Tiorba a taccone of the baroque Neapolitan poet Felippo Sgruttendio de Scafato. Luigi Bonaffini has translated works by Eugenio Cirese, Albino Pierro, Dino Campana, Mario Luzi, and Giose Rimanelli.

 

Shaham

Nathan

 

Nathan Shaham.  Bone to the Bone [‘Etsem el ‘atsmo].  Tr. Dalya Bilu.  Grove Press [Am Oved Publishers, Ltd., 1981].  1993.  345 pp.  Cloth:  $22.00; ISBN 0-8021-1001-0.  A Russian Jew, Avigdor Barkov first leaves his homeland for Eretz Israel in the 1920s.  There he devotes himself to the political revolution in Palestine.  He has an affair, and although his lover gives birth to his son, he leaves them--without guilt--when his ardently leftist beliefs draw him back to postrevolutionary Russia.  In Moscow he falls in love again, marries, and fathers a daughter, but even this family cannot supplant political activism as Barkov's primary responsibility.  Indeed, he must survive interrogation, torture, imprisonment, and nearly 25 years' exile from Moscow as his true dedication to communism is questioned.  And it is not until he is 70 and returns to the Israel he left nearly 50 years before that he is reunited with his long-abandoned children, his wife, and even his lover.

 

She

Lao

Chinese

Lao She. Blades of Grass: The Stories of Lao She. Tr. William A. Lyell and Sarah Wei-ming Chen.  Honolulu. University of Hawaii Press. 1999. 310 pp. Cloth: $48.00; ISBN 0-8248-1506-8. Paper: $18.95; ISBN 0-8248-1803-2. Fiction from Modern China. Lao She’s stories have established him as a master of classic modern fiction, and now this collection of his stories is available in English translation. He is a writer eternally immersed in and fascinated by the kaleidoscope of humankind. The stories are characterized by humor and by intensely sympathertic explorations of human relationships. Some of them are unsettling, many are poignant, most make us laugh, and all evoke the color and energy of life. William A. Lyell is the translator of Lu Xan’s Diary of a Madman and Other Stories and Zhang Henshu’s Shanghai Express. Sarah Wei-ming Chen has also translated a Japanese story by Matsumoto Seicho.

 

Shems

Hmayyag

Armenian

Hmayyag Shems. For the House of Torkom. Tr. Vahé Baladouni & John Gery. Cross-Cultural Communication. 1999 [1994]. 47 pp. Cloth: $15.00; ISBN 0-89304-459-8. Paper: ISBN 0-89304-460-1. Armenian Writers 1. Bilingual. Over the years, critics have generally described Western Armenian literature as consisting of two strains: Keghabashd, the literature of the aesthetics or the senses, and Imatsabashd, the literature of the mind. As a Western Armenian poet, Hmayyag Shems was noted for having his own distinctive style, labeled by one critic as a propensity "toward spiritualization." This book collects the original and English translations of nine prose poems composed by Shems between 1937 and 1949. The original text derives from Hmayyag Shems: Select Works (Watertown, MA: Baikar Association, 1994), edited by Vahé Baladouni. Baladouni's most recent work, Armenian Merchants of the Seventeenth and Early Eighteenth Centuries: English East Indian Company Sources, was published by the American Philosophical Society in 1998. An English-Serbian edition of John Gery's poetry, American Ghost: Selected Poems, is forthcoming from Nova Editions in Belgrade.

 

Shiki

Masaoka

Japanese

Masaoka Shiki.  Selected Poems.  Tr. Burton Watson.  Columbia University Press.  1998.  127 pp.  Cloth:  $16.50; ISBN 0-231-11090-1.  Paper:  ISBN 0-231-11091-X.  This selection consists of 144 haiku, 34 tanka, and 4 kanshi, or poems in classical Chinese, arranged in chronological order within each category. 

 

Shikishi

Princess

Japanese

Princess Shikishi.  String of Beads:  Complete Poems of Princess Shikishi.  Tr. Hiroaki Sato.  University of Hawaii Press.  1993.  177 pp.  Cloth:  ISBN 0-8248-1483-5.  Bilingual.  Princess Shikishi, Emperor Goshirakawa's third daughter, left a body of poems luminous with tranquil beauty and sadness.  In this volume, noted translator Hiroaki Sato makes available in one-line form all of the tanka--400 poems--attributed to Princess Shikishi.  To provide allusive contexts, many of the poems are accompanied by extensive footnotes and endnotes, often with complete episodes from Tale of Ise and other classical texts.  With his collaborator, Burton Watson, Sato won the PEN Translation Prize for From the Country of Eight Islands:  An Anthology of Japanese Poetry.

 

Shimazaki

Chifumi

Japanese

Chifumi Shimazaki. Troubled Souls: From the Japanese Noh Plays of the Fourth Group. Cornell University East Asia Program. 1998. 342 pp. Cloth: ISBN 1-885445-55-5. Paper: ISBN 1-885445-95-4. Cornell East Asia Series No. 95. Bilingual. Troubled Souls is devoted to the Japanese Noh plays in the fourth group, a colorful assembly of some 90 "miscellaneous Noh" that are performed fourth in a formal five-Noh program at the climax of the day's entertainment. While its predecessor, Restless Spirits (Cornell East Asia Series No. 76, 1995), deals with the first four of the nine subgroups into which these plays are divided, Troubled Souls focuses on six masterpieces chosen from each of the remaining five subgroups. This book includes line-by-line translations and Romanized versions of the original Japanese texts, as well as extensive running commentary on the plays, a highly informative introduction to the intricacies of Noh drama, notes on pronunciation, and a plan of a Noh stage based on the Kanze Noh Theater. Chifumi Shimazaki has studied Noh as a performing art for more than fifty years and has published a number of translations of medieval Noh texts.

 

Shono

Junzo

Japanese

Junzo Shono. Evening Clouds [Yobe no Kumo]. Tr. Wayne P. Lammers. Berkeley. Stone Bridge Press. 2000 [Japan, 1964-65]. 224 pp. Paper: $12.95; ISBN 1-880656-48-5. This celebrated work by one of Japan's literary stylists, Evening Clouds is a book filled with delicate images of ordinary life, richly and precisely observed. Life appears comfortable and serene, but Junzo Shono's portrayal has a strange and evocative undercurrent, as the most minute details slowly resonate through a universe that is unforgiving. The author's trademark "snapshot" prose style is a distinctive Japanese voice that combines the crafted naturalism of haiku with the Ozu-like clarity of film. Wayne P. Lammers's translation of Shono's Still Life and Other Stories, also published by Stone Bridge, won the PEN Center West Literary Award for Translation.

 

Shua

Ana María

Spanish

Ana María Shua.  Patient [Soy paciente].  Tr. David William Foster.  Latin American Literary Review Press/Consortium Book Sales.  1997.  128 pp.  Paper:  $14.95; ISBN 0-935480-90-0.  Patient is the humorous story of a man lost in the bureaucratic workings of a state hospital.  Anticipating only a brief stay for minor testing, he soon realizes that leaving the hospital will not be such a simple task.  In the most absurd situations, he patiently suffers his fate at the hands of absent-minded doctors, disgruntled nurses, eccentric family members, and complacent fellow patients.  Winner of the first prize in the Concurso Internacional de Narrativa de Editoral Losada. 

 

Shukshin

Vasily

Russian

Vasily Shukshin.   Stories from a Siberian Village.  Trs. Laura Michael and John Givens.  Northern Illinois University Press.  1996.  304 pp.  Cloth: $35.00; ISBN 0-87580-211-7.  Paper: $16.00; ISBN 0-87580-572-8.  This collection introduces Shukshin to English readers with 25 stories that reflect the Siberian origins of his artistic identity.  These stories, most of which have never before appeared in English, are set in a remote Siberian village caught between rural traditions and modern Soviet life.  There Shukshin's peasants─survivors of revolution, collectivization, and war─seek their identity in a "brave new world."  Stories include "Country Folk," "Styopka," "A Roof Over Your Head," "Passing Through," "Gogol and Raika," "Uncle Yermolai," and "Siberian Pies."  Michael is a freelance translator, and Givens is assistant professor of Russian at the University of Rochester.

 

Shunshin

Chin

Japanese

Chin Shunshin. The Taiping Rebellion [Taihei tengoku]. Tr. Joshua A. Fogel. New York. M. E. Sharpe. 2001 [Kodansha, Japan, 1982]. 716 pp. Cloth: $79.95; ISBN 0-7656-0099-4. A major historical novel by one of Japan's most popular modern writers, The Taiping Rebellion vividly portrays one of the most compelling and horrifying stories of the 19th century, when a quasi- religious and social movement attempted to overthrow the Qing dynasty and left 20 million dead in their wake. Using actual historical figures such as Hong Xiuquan, Feng Yunshan, Hu Linyi, Zuo Zongtang, Lin Zexu, and Zeng Guofan as characters, Chin brilliantly offers on a grand scale reminiscent of Herman Wouk a panoramic view of countless battles and other historical events and fascinating, probing character studies.

 

Siguad

Dominique

French

Dominique Sigaud. Somewhere in a Desert [L’Hypothèse du desert]. Tr. Frank Wynne. Arcade. 1999 [Editions Gallimard, 1996]. 128 pp. Cloth: $22.95; ISBN 1-55970-492-6. Desert Storm has ended. A body lies in no-man’s land in the desert, across the Iraqi border between the allied front and a small Saudi village. No wounds show how the man died. No tags or insignia identify which side he fought on. The man is John Miller, an American soldier who has gone missing in action. While his wife, Mary, waits at home in the States for news, John has disappeared and died an absurd death. Dominique Sigaud tells John’s story and those of the people who encounter him in his last hours of life and in the days that follow his death. The mystery and horror of war are revealed through the eyes and the death of this Unknown Soldier. Hailed internationally, this haunting novel marks Sigaud’s American debut.

 

Singer

Isaac Bashevis

Yiddish

Isaac Bashevis Singer.  Meshugah.  Trs. Isaac Bashevis Singer and Nili Wachtel.  Farrar, Straus and Giroux.  1994.  232 pp.  Cloth:  $22.00; ISBN 0-374-20847-6.  Meshugah is the story of Holocaust survivors in New York in the early 1950s, and its narrator is Aaron Greidinger, 47, a writer for the Forward who is just beginning to receive recognition for his stories and his Sunday radio talks.  He finds himself inextricably involved with a group of refugees on the Upper West Side after Max Aberdam of Warsaw, a "ghost" whom he had long thought dead, walks into his newspaper office.

 

Sinisgalli

Leonardo

Italian

Leonardo Sinisgalli.   I Saw the Muses--Selected Poems:  1931-1942 [Vidi le muse].  Ed. and Tr. Rina Ferrarelli.  Guernica Editions, Inc. [Mondadori Editore, 1943].  1997.  96 pp.  Paper:  $10.00;  ISBN 1-55071-025-7.  Bilingual.  Sinisgalli (1908-1981) was born in Lucania, Italy, and was a painter as well as a major poet.  His images and metaphors are from nature.  His muses perch on an ancient oak, eating, not ambrosia, but acorns and berries.  The dominant landscapes of his poetry are infinite, a world of affections, places and people, that transcend time and the particulars of culture and locality.  This collection of almost 60 poems includes such works as "Il sole ti apre"/"The Sun Opens," "Lazzaretto"/"The Hospital," "Sera di San Lorenzo"/"Night of the Shooting Stars," and "I vecchi versi tornano a memoria"/"Old Verses Come to Mind."

Skármeta

Antonio

Spanish

Antonio Skármeta.  Love─Fifteen.  Tr. Jonathan Tittler.  Latin American Literary Review Press/Consortium Book Sales.  1996.  128 pp.  Paper:  $13.94; ISBN 0-935480-82-X.  What would man be willing to sacrifice for love?  Dr. Raymond Papst suddenly leaves his wife, profession and reputation behind to pursue Sophie Mass, a 15-year-old tennis star.  Is it love, or is he blinded by her public image?  In this Latin American version of Lolita, Skármeta reveals with a mischievous smile, another side of the rich and famous, depicting the human hunger for endless youth and perfect love.  Skármeta has won the Casa de las Américas prize (1969) and the Giovanni Boccaccio (1996).  His best known work is The Postman.  Tittler is professor of Hispanic Literature at Cornell University.

 

Skram

Amalie

Norwegian

Skram, Amalie.  Lucie.  Translated by Katherine Hanson and Judith Messick.

            England: Norvik Press/Chester Springs, PA: Dufour Editions, 2002.

            168 pp.  Paper: $16.95.  ISBN 1-870041-48-8.  [Lucie.  1888].

 

            Amalie Skram, a contemporary of Ibsen, tells the story of Lucie, a beautiful dancing girl from Tivoli, who marries Theodor Gerner, a respectable straight-laced lawyer from the middle-class society of nineteenth-century Norway.  His attempts to turn Lucie into a proper wife are unsuccessful, and she ultimately rebels in a manner which brings misery and despair to them both.   In this novel, published in 1888, Skram contributes to the great debate about sexual morality which engaged many Scandinavian writers in the late nineteenth century.

 

Slutsky

Boris

Russian

Boris Slutsky. Things That Happened. Ed., tr., and intro. G. S. Smith. Birmingham, U.K. GLAS Publishers. U.S.  Distributor: Ivan R. Dee. 1999 [1998]. 314 pp. Paper: $14.95; ISBN 1-5663-235-8. Glas New Russian Writing, vol. 19. Unlike his contemporary Solzhenitsyn, Boris Slutsky (1919-1986) remained inside the Soviet literary establishment, and kept his unacceptable work to himself. His best poetry and prose were published only after his death. In this collection, the innermost thoughts of this clear-eyed tragedian are revealed as he endured the dynamism and terror of the 1930s, fought heroically in Russia, Romania, and Yugoslavia during the Second World War, and then became an increasingly sceptical witness to the de-stalinizations and re-stalinizations that preceded the "terminal senility" of the Brezhnev regime. Gerald Smith supplies a detailed running commentary to Slutsky's testament, which appears here for the first time in English translation.

 

Smaïl

Paul

French

Paul Smaïl. Smile. Tr. Simon Pleasance and Fronza Woods with Janine Dupont. London. A Five Star Paperback for Serpent's Tail. U. S. Distributor: Consortium. 2000 [Editions Balland, Paris, 1997]. 192 pp. Paper: $14.00; ISBN 1-85242-630-6. A literary sensation when first published in France, Smile chronicles everyday racism as experienced by a young Arab man in Paris today. Inspired by his love for literature, the narrator refracts his experience through the characters of Shakespeare and Melville, his favorite writers. "You can call me Smaïl I insisted, drawing the word out, leaving a good gap between the a and the i with its two dots: Smy-eel. It had been a while since I'd pronounced my name the Arab way . . . I can only get so far by being crafty, rubbing out those two dots on the i and touching up my photo, I can get given an interview but sooner or later I've got to show up in the flesh . . . An A-rab in other words." Paul Smaïl is a pseudonym for the author who lives in Morocco:

 

Smethurst

Mae J.

Japanese

Mae J. Smethurst. Dramatic Representation of Filial Piety: Five Noh in Translation. Cornell University East Asia Program. 1998. 172 pp. Cloth: 1-885445-50-4. Paper: ISBN 1-885445-97-0. Cornell East Asia Series No. 97. This volume of translations of noh is unique among those available in the West because rather than containing only narrative, song, and dance, the five genzaino, or real-life noh, translated here share many components of Aristotelian mimesis. In Shun'ei and Nishikido there are two brothers; in Shichikiochi, Nakamitsu, and Dampu, filial piety and loyalty to one's lord are important. These plays have either never been translated into English or have not been translated for a long time. Smethurst believes that her translations are "as close to the original as English allows, sometimes to a fault. It is the philosophy of this volume that the translation should assist the reader in recognizing how at the climactic moments the chorus takes over the words of the actors or the actor himself delivered his own stage directions and quotes himself as saying what he has just said. The English translation at these moments does not sound natural, because we do not have this convention in the traditional theatres of the West. However, the practice is not unusual in noh and this translator has attempted to remain true to the text." 

 

Sneok

Paul

Dutch

Paul Snoek. Hercules, Richelieu and Nostradamus. Tr. and intro. Kendall Dunkelberg. København & Los Angeles. Green Integer. 2000 [Manteau, Brussels, 1960, 1961, and 1964] Mant. 175 pp. Paper: $$10.95; ISBN 1-892295-42-3. Green Integer 65. The noted Flemish writer, Paul Snoek, was one of the most controversial figures of modern Flemish literature. He was often referred to in the mid-fifties as the "James Dean" of Belgium, in part because of his love of fast cars, wild living, and anti-establishment polemics. Despite this, he went on to receive most of the major Belgian and Flemish literary prizes, becoming an influential figure in 20th-century writing in Dutch. This collection of three of Snoek's most important books, represents a darkerm ironic, and at times even absurd side of Snoek's writing. As the translator, Kendall Dunkelberg, notes, "In these works clearly we are dealing with a mature poet who has undergone several transformations in his sense of poetics, and who had gained confidence as a result of this development."

 

Södergran

Edith

Spanish

Edith Södergran.  Violet Twilights.  Trs. Daisy Aldan and Leif Sjöberg.  Cross-Cultural Communications.  1993.  48 pp.  Cloth:  $15.00; ISBN 0-89304-733-3.  Paper:  $7.50; ISBN 0-89304-734-1.  Scandinavian Writers─Chapbook 1.  Bilingual collection of works such as "Violetta skymningar/Violet Twilights"; "Sången om de tre gravarna/The Song of the Three Graves"; "Verktygets klagan/The Tool's Lament"; "Vid soluppgång/At Sunrise"; and "Blixtens trängtan/The Lightning Is Yearning."  Aldan's latest translations include Barrabas and Climb Parnassus and Behold, both by the Swiss poet Albert Steffen, and To Purify the Words of the Tribe, complete poems of Stéphane Mallarmé.  Sjöberg has been a co-translator of:  Selected Poems of Gunnar Ekelöf (with W. H. Auden); A Mölna Elegy by Gunnar Ekelöf (with Muriel Rukeyser); Windows & Stones by Tomas Tranströmer (with May Swenson); and Markings by Dag Hammarskjöld (with W. H. Auden). 

 

Södergrun

Edith

Swedish

Edith Södergran.  Violet Twilights.  Trs.  Daisy Aldan and Leif Sjöberg.  Cross-Cultural Communications.  1993.  48 pp.  Cloth:  $15.00; ISBN 0-89304-733-3.  Paper:  $5.00; ISBN 0-89304-734-1.  Scandinavian Writers Chapbook 1.  Though she lived most of her short life in Finland, Södergran wrote in the Swedish language.  This bilingual collection includes such poems as "Autumn's Last Blossom," "The Tool's Lament," "Hamlet," "The Star," and "The Land That Is Nowhere."

 

Sola

Liu

Chinese

Liu Sola.  Chaos and All That [Hun tun chia li ko leng].  Tr. Richard King.  University of Hawaii Press [Breakthrough Publications, Hong Kong, 1991].  1994.  134 pp.  Cloth:  ISBN 0-8248-1617-X.  Paper:  ISBN 0-8248-1651-X.  This little novel, set against the backdrop of post-Mao China, juxtaposes recollections of childhood, pet ownership, and marriage with discussions of art, sex, and murder, weaving together an absurdist tapestry that is the inner life of the novel's felicitously named protagonist, Huang Haha.  Winner of the 1991 British Comparative Literature Association Translation Competition for Chinese.

 

Solares

Ignacio

Spanish

Ignacio Solares.  Lost in the City:  Tree of Desire and Serafín.  Trs. Carolyn and John Brushwood.  University of Texas Press.  1998.  160 pp.  Cloth:  $27.50; ISBN 0-292-77731-0.  Paper:  $14.95; ISBN 0-292-77732-9.  In these two novels, Solares describes Mexico's different social classes with Dickensian realism.  Cristina, the young protagonist of Tree of Desire, and her little brother Joaquín run away from a home that is outwardly normal but inwardly disfunctional.  Lost on the streets of Mexico City, they confront some of the most terrifying aspects of city life.  Or is it all a dream?  The story suggests, without confirming, that sexual abuse has driven Cristina to her desperate escape.  But is it an escape?  Are they awakening from a dream, or reentering a nightmare?  Serafín, too, is lost in the city.  Searching for his father, who has deserted the family, he is virtually helpless amid the city dangers.  Serafín finds compassion in surprising places, but will he survive to return to his mother and their rural village?

 

Solares

Ignacio

Spanish

Ignacio Solares. Lost in the City. Tree of Desire and Serafin: Two Novels by Ignacio Solares. Tr. Carolyn and John Brushwood. Austin. University of Texas Press. 1998. 160 pp. Cloth: $27.50; ISBN 0-292-77731-0. Paper: $14.95; ISBN 0-292-77732-9. The Texas Pan American Series. These two novels by one of Mexico's premier writers illuminate many aspects of contemporary Mexico City described with Dickensian realism. His focus on young protagonists, unusual in Mexican literature, opens a window onto problems of children's vulnerability that knows no national borders. At the same time, his use of elements of the fantastic and the paranormal, and his evocative writing style, make his work both terrifying and surprising. The worlds of the novels' protagonists intersect but do not parallel each other. Cristina, the 10-year-old main character of Tree of Desire, moves from middle-class to lower-class within Mexico City, while Serafin's story instead moves from a rural to an urban environment. The two novels, read together, offer a multidimensional view of Mexican society.

 

Šolijan

Antun

Croatian

Antun Šolijan. A Brief Excursion and Other Stories. Tr. and foreword by Ellen Elias-Bursac. Evanston. Northwestern University Press. 1999. 252 pp. Cloth: $16.95; ISBN 0-8101-1635-9. A Brief Excursion anchors this collection of fiction by Antun Šolijan, one of the most significant postwar Croatian writers. This novel and six stories, including some from Solijan's first book, Traitors (1961), reveal a sensibility both comic and poignant, devoted to questions of identity and solidarity, and of how the one and the many conflict and intermingle. These issues were at the center of both political and literary life for Šolijan, who, because of his politics, was persona non grata in public life from 1974 until his death in 1993, although his ideas and views became ubiquitous on the Croatian cultural scene. Ellen Elias-Bursac won the AATSEEL Translation Prize for her translation of David Albahari's Words Are Something Else (1996). 

 

Sonnevi

Göran

Swedish

Göran Sonnevi.  A Child is Not a Knife.  Tr. Rika Lesser.  Princeton University Press.  1993.  179 pp.  Paper:  ISBN 0-691-01543-0.  This collection of bilingual poems is preceded by an introduction by the author, followed by a bibliography of Sonnevi's books in Swedish and publication dates.  Next follows a selected list of translations of Sonnevi into English, and a list of translations of Sonnevi into other languages.  There is also a list of selected criticism of Sonnevi in Swedish.  Lesser writes of her thoughts, comments, and discoveries brought about by the translation of Sonnevi's poetry in her section entitled "Sonnevi:  A Translator's Retrospective Montage."

 

Sophocles

 

Greek

Sophocles. Philoctetes. Tr. Desmond Egan. Intro. Brian Arkins. Newbridge, Ireland. The Goldsmith Press, Ltd. U. S. Distributor: Milestone Press, Little Rock, AR. 1999. 62 pp. Paper: $15.00; ISBN 1-888-607-03-3. Desmond Egan has published 14 collections of poetry, one of prose, and one previous drama translation—Medea by Euripides (1991). In both English versions of these classic Greek plays, Egan resists any temptation to add to the original texts (unlike, for example, Seamus Heaney's version of Medea, which has the chorus refer to Northern Ireland).  Because the original significance of Philoctetes of 409 B.C. is now lost, and because Egan provides no modern equivalents to aid interpretation, readers must, according to Brian Atkins, "actualize the potential of the source text without recourse to familiar yardsticks. . . . The new body that Sophocles' spirit inhabits is, of course, the language of the target culture, English, a language that the translator must, since performance is central, hear. . . . Through hard, concrete language, Egan refutes Virginia Woolf's dictum that 'It is useless to read Greek in translation: translators can but offer us a vague equivalent' and puts into practice his own assertion that poetry 'consists of that essence which can be translated.'"

 

Sosa

Roberto

Spanish

Roberto Sosa.  The Common Grief [Máscara suelta].  Tr. Jo Anne Engelbert.  Curbstone Press/Inbook.  1994.  112 pp.  Paper:  $11.95; ISBN 1-880684-23-3.  Bilingual.  Sosa's childhood coincides with the Honduran dictatorship of Tiburcio Carías Andino, a period of severe repression.  After his Los Pobres (1969) won the Adonais Prize in Spain and Un mundo para todos dividido (1971) won the Casa de las Américas Prize in Cuba, Latin America began to recognize him as a major poetic talent.  Poems include "El Pequeñin" ("The Child"), "Del Odio" ("On Hate"), "La casa donde habita la poesía" ("The House Where Poetry Lives"), "De la bruma hice vino" ("From the Mist I Made Wine"), and "Los brutales amantes" ("The Brutal Lovers").

 

Soucy

Jean-Yves

French

Hacikyan, Agop J. and Jean-Yves Soucy.  Summer Without Dawn.  Translated by

            Christina Le Vernoy and Joyce Bailey.  Toronto: McClelland and Stewart,

2002.      516 pp.  Cloth: $29.95.  ISBN 0-7710-3752-X.  [Un été sans aube.

Montreal: Éditions Libre Expression, 1991].

 

This novel is the saga of one family’s struggle to survive the collapse of

the Ottoman Empire during the First World War.  The story takes place against the backdrop of the Armenian Massacre, when the Armenian people were deported from the empire and slaughtered or left to die of starvation.  The novel tells the story of Armenian journalist Vartan Balian who searches for his family throughout the Ottoman Empire.  Agop J. Hacikyan is the author of twenty-one books, including three novels, and has translated and edited the works of major Armenian poets and fiction writers.  Jean-Yves Soucy is the author of several novels, short story collections, and books of essays.  Both writers live in Montreal.

 

Spaziani

Maria Luisa

Italian

Maria Luisa Spaziani.  Star of Free Will [La stella del libero arbitrio].  Trs. Irene Marchegiani Jones and Carol Lettieri.  Guernica [Arnoldo Mondadori Editore, 1986].  1996.  136 pp.  Paper: $13.00; ISBN 1-55071-002-8.  Amidst the many literary movements in Italian poetry since World War II, Spaziani has carved out her own lyrical voice, using striking imagery, complex metrics, and classical control to evoke the disorder of the post­modern world.  This collection contains poems such as "Barcelona," "The Palette Goes Wild," "Flashes from an Italian Journey," "Fall at Prima Porta," and "Histrionic light give me back his cloudy profile."  In addition to her nine volumes of poetry, Spaziani has published critical essays, fiction and plays.  Jones is an Associate Professor of Italian at Cal State, Long Beach.  Lettieri is a San Francisco-based freelance writer and editor.

 

Spina

Michele

Italian

Michele Spina.  West of the Moon.  Tr. Ann Colcord.  Peter Owen/Dufour Editions [Sellerio editore, 1991].  1995.  103 pp.  Paper:  $16.95; ISBN 0-7206-0918-6.  A retired timber merchant encounters a beautiful woman during a winter journey to Venice.  On the train, the two begin a conversation which continues later in the cafés and restaurants of the city.  Yet they do not seek to communicate so much as to find a new and illuminating grammar with which to explore the shadows of the inexpressible.

 

Spina

Michele

Italian

Spina, Michele.  Sleep: A Utopian Bestiary.  Translated by Ann Colcord with Hugh

                Shankland.  England: Colin Smythe Ltd/Chester Springs, PA: Dufour

            Editions, 2002.  Paper: $19.95.  ISBN 0-8023-1334-5. 

 

            Spina’s novel Sleep follows an insomniac’s long journey to morning through a night of tormenting memories and lucid drunken speculation.  A sequence of bizarre encounters, throughout the interminable night, leads him to recover some meaning in his life.  Michele Spina was born in Messina (Sicily) in 1923.  His first book to appear in English was West of the Moon (Peter Owen, 1994).  Night and Other Short Stories (Colin Smythe) was published in 1998, and Sleep was completed in London in 1990, shortly before his death.

 

Stampa

Gaspara

Italian

Gaspara Stampa.  Gaspara Stampa:  Selected Poems.  Eds. and Trs. Laura Anna Stortoni and Mary Prentice Lillie.  Italica Press.  1994.  272 pp.  Paper:  $15.00; ISBN 0-93497703702.  This bilingual collection of selected poems presents the first English translation of Stampa's work.  Considered the greatest woman poet of the Italian Renaissance, she was a skilled musician and author of some of the most musical poetry in the Italian language.  Her Petrarchan sonnets of unrequited love speak in a language of honest passion and profound loss.  The volume includes an introduction to the poet and her work, notes to the poems, a bibliography, and a first-line index.

 

Steffen

Albert

German

Albert Steffen.  Barrabas:  Drama in Four Acts.  Tr. Daisy Aldan.  Adonis Press [Verlag für Schöne].  1993.  133 pp.  Paper:  ISBN 0-932776-19-1.  This four-act drama is set in the prison cell beneath Pilate's Hall of Judgment.  One of the few translations of works by Steffen, one of Switzerland's most noted 20th-century writers. 

Albert Steffen.  Climb Parnassus and Behold!  Tr. Daisy Aldan.  Adonis Press.  1993.  48 pp.  Paper:  ISBN 0-932776-20-5.  Collection of poems.

 

Stendhal

 

French

Stendhal. The Charterhouse of Parma [Chartreuse de Parme]. Tr. Richard Howard. Modern Library Edition/Random House. 1999. 507 pp. Cloth: $24.95; ISBN 0-679-60245-3. Balzac considered it the most important French novel of his time. André Gide later deemed it the greatest of all French novels, and Henry James judged it to be a masterpiece. Now Pulitzer Translator Richard Howard presents a new rendition of Stendhal's epic tale ("fifty-two days to write, twenty-eight weeks to translate") of romance, adventure, and court intrigue set in early 19th-century Italy. The novel chronicles the exploits of Fabrizio del Dongo, an ardent young aristocrat who joins Napoleon's army just before the Battle of Waterloo. Yet perhaps the novel's most unforgettable characters are the hero's beautiful aunt, the alluring Duchess of Sanseverina, and her lover, Count Mosca, who plot to further Fabrizio's political career at the treacherous court of Parma in a sweeping story that illuminates an entire epoch of European history. This edition includes original illustrations by Robert Andrew Parker and “Notes” and a “Translator's Afterword” by Howard.

 

Stétié

Salah

French

Salah Stétié. Cold Water Shielded: Selected Poems. Tr. Michael Bishop. Newcastle upon Tyne. Bloodaxe Books. U. S. Distributor: Dufour Editions. 224 pp. Paper: $22.95; ISBN 1-85224-487-9. Bloodaxe Contemporary French Poets, vol. 10. Salah Stétié is a French Lebanese poet and essayist of international renown in whose soberly beautiful poems, Western culture merges with Oriental and Arabic traditions. His writing has a swirling metaphysical dimension while never ceasing to root itself in earthy, sensuous experience. His poetry evokes a deep, half-questioning, half-serene meditation on all that is "hanging on the other side of being." Born in Beirut in 1929, Stétié turned his attention towards the problems of contemporary poetry after studies in Lebanon and France and soon developed parallel careers as a writer and distinguished diplomat. Michael Bishop's publications include books on Deguy and Char, Nineteenth-Century French Poetry (1993), Contemporary French Women Poets I and II (1995), and Women's Poetry in France 1965-1995: A Bilingual Anthology (1997).

 

Stifter

Adalbert

German

Adalbert Stifter. Indian Summer [Der Nachsommer]. Tr. Wendell Frye. Berne. Peter Lang. 1999. 479 pp. Cloth: ISBN 0-8204-4625-4. One of Stifter's great epic works, Indian Summer is the sensitive account of the formative years in the life of Heinrich, a student of natural sciences who is born into a bourgeois environment but is influenced and gently guided by a nobleman, the old Baron von Risach. In fact, it is the baron's own reminiscences which give the book its title. Comparable in some way to Gottfried Keller's Der grüne Heinrich, this novel nevertheless reflects Stifter's own moral values, his ethical thinking, and his deep reverence for nature. Here is one of the most complete statements of the "Humanitätsideal": the young geologist becomes totally immersed in traditional values and culture, thereby becoming a more complete and fulfilled human being. Wendell Frye's American English translation conveys a sense of Stifter's complex sentence structure and talent for description in the hopes that Indian Summer will be read as a narrative rather than as a translation.

    

Adalbert Stifter. Witiko. Tr. Wendell Frye. Berne. Peter Lang. 596 pp. Paper: ISBN 0-8204-4624-6. Set around the events of the succession struggle of 1142 in medieval Bohemia, the novel's main character, Witiko, searches for the Right, finds it and his beloved while never losing touch with the common folk. His quest is set against the panoramic backdrop of national Bohemian politics and history, with his fate paralleling that of the acknowledged rightful duke, Wladislaw, who is also seeking the path of justice. Witiko is considered one of the most significant German historical novels of the 19th century and is one of two major works by Adalbert Stifter (1805-1868), the other being Der Nachsommer.

 

Storm

Theodor

German

Theodor Storm. Hans and Heinz Kirch with Immensee and Journey to a Hallig. Tr. Denis Jackson and Anja Nauck. London. Angel Books, Ltd./Dufour Editions. 2000. 190 pp. Paper: $18.95; ISBN 1-946162-60-3. Theodor Storm's fictional achievement goes well beyond the celebrated Novelle Der Schimmelreiter [The Dykemaster], translated by Denis Jackson and published by Angel Classics. This selection of three more of his most impressive narratives, two of them appearing in English for the first time, represents three stages in the development of a German writer whose best work ranks with that of Thomas Hardy. Immensee (1850), a love story whose powerful atmosphere is heightened by all-pervasive symbols and folk song-like verse, has long been a favorite of both the German- and English-speaking worlds. Journey to a Hallig (1871) is both a magical evocation of the German North Sea coast in high summer and a layered account of an inner journey back into an old man's past. Hans and Heinz Kirch (1882) is one of Storm's masterpieces, a tragic tale of father-son conflict set among the seaside Kleinbürger mercantile community on the German Baltic.  

 

Strauss

Botho

German

Botho Strauss.  The Young Man [Der Junge Mann].  Tr. Roslyn Theobald.  Hydra Books, Northwestern University Press [Carl Hanser Verlag, Munich-Vienna, 1984].  1995.  274 pp.  $24.95; ISBN 0-8101-1338-4.  The young man of the title, Leon Pracht, has left the theater to write.  Contemplative, brooding, alienated from both society in general and those to whom he should be closest, Pracht moves numbly through a series of encounters, the precision of his observation of both the everyday and the fantastic underscored by his increasing detachment.  His reflections, meditations, and reactions build a compelling portrait of contemporary society and of the individual struggling to find a place both within and without it.  Strauss' Devotion is also published by Hydra Books, and his Paare, Passanten (Couples, Passersby, 1981) and Wohnen Dämmern Lügen (Living, Glimmering, Lying, 1994) are forthcoming.  Theobald is the translator of Lisa Fittko's Solidarity and Treason:  Resistance and Exile, 1933-1940, Richard Glazar's Trap with a Green Fence:  Survival in Treblinka, and Barbara König's Beneficiary. 

 

Strauss

Botho

German

Botho Strauss. Living Glimmering Lying [Wohnen Dämmern Lügen]. Tr. Roslyn Theobald. Hydra Books/Northwestern University Press. 1999. 171 pp. Cloth: $26.95; ISBN 0-8101-1283-3. Populated by characters who are seaching for meaning in life and in one another—a hiker waiting for a train in a deserted station, a television journalist who meets an old lover he doesn’t really recognize, mismatched lovers, couples married and casual, lost and lonely people—Botho Strauss’s Living Glimmering Lying is a melancholy collection of sketches and vignettes, a series of tableaux of post-reunification Berlin. Strauss is known for his powers of observation and his ability to filter the particulars of everyday existence through his singular sensibility. His works include The Young Man and Couples, Passersby (Northwestern, 1995), translated by Rosyln Theobald, who also translated Our House by Barbara König (Northwestern, 1998).

 

Strindberg

August

Swedish

August Strindberg. Strindberg—Other Sides: Seven Plays. Tr. and intro. Joe Martin. Foreword Björn Meidal. Peter Lang. 1997. 382 pp. Paper: $32.95; ISBN 0-8204-3691-7. Joe Martin's translations are based upon the new national Swedish edition of Stringberg's Collected Works, closely abiding by the playwright's techniques of "scoring" his scripts for actors and directors. The plays are illuminated in introductory essays that evaluate Strndberg's role in transforming theatre (and art) with his extraordinary new forms. The Ghost Sonata (1907) is a keystone in the construction of expressionistic theatre, designated by the author as "opus 3" of his "chamber play" sequence.  The Pelican (1907) was Strindberg's third attempt to write "opus 4" and except for The Ghost Sonata, has been the most frequently performed of the chamber plays in Europe. Carl XII (1901) is unique among Strindberg's works as a historical play little known outside his native Sweden. The Dance of Death (1900) Strindberg called his "strongest and simplest play" and his "deepest play, with a fair number of new discoveries in it." Three one-act plays include The Stronger (1888), Pariah (1889), and Simoom (1889). Joe Martin is a writer, translator, and theatre director residing in Washinton, D. C. His recent books include Keeper of the Protocols: The Works of Jens Bjørneboe and a translation of Bjørneboe's Semmelweis.

 

Strunge

Michael

Danish

Michael Strunge. A Virgin from a Chilly Decade [En jomfru fra et forfrossent årti]. Tr. Bente Elsworth. Intro. John Fletcher. Todmorden, Lancastershire, UK. Arc Publications. 83 pp. Paper: £7.95; ISBN 1-90007248-3. Visible Poets Series. Bilingual. With the publication of his first collection of poems in 1978 when he was only 20 years old, Michael Strunge was instantly recognized as a rebellious, angry poet who identified strongly with the poor and socially sidelined. Despite his success—he was a prolific writer who had 11 collections of his poetry published during his short life—Strunge became increasingly disillusioned and depressed, until he committed suicide at the age of 27. His poetry is still widely read in Denmark, and this new translation by Bente Elsworth of poems from eight of his collections makes Strunge's work available for the first time in English.

 

Subercaseaux

Elizabeth

Spanish

Elizabeth Subercaseaux. The Song of the Distant Root [Canto de la raiz lejana]. Tr. John J. Hassett. Pittsburgh. Latin American Literary Review Press. 2001 [1988]. 91 pp. Paper: $12.95; ISBN 1-891270-11-7. Series Discoveries. In this magical-realism novella, Salustio, a self-styled Utopian visionary, "dreams" a village where freedom and equality flourish and—like St. Exupéry's Little Prince—he goes in search of it, meeting en route many self-consciously symbolic figures. The only rational voice to be heard amid this whimsy is the earthy, sardonic one of Salustio's clear-eyed wife Clarisa. Elizabeth Subercaseaux, in addition to her numerous journalistic publications, is also an accomplished short story writer and novelist, joining an impressive group of Chilean women writers whose careers blossomed in the 80s and 90s, including Isabel Allende, Diamela Eltit, Ana María del Río, Pía Barros, and Marcela Serrano. The Song of the Distant Root is her second novel, preceded by Silencia in 1986.  

 

Sun-Won

Hwang

Korean

Hwang Sun-won.  The Descendants of Cain [K'ain _i Huye].  Trs. Suh Ji-moon and Julie Pickering.  M.E. Sharpe, Inc./UNESCO.  1997.  192 pp.  Cloth:  $52.95; ISBN 0-7656-0136-2.  Paper:  $19.95; ISBN 0-7565-0137-0.  This novel is based on Sun-won's own experience in his North Korean village at a historic turning point for modern Korea between the end of World War II (and with it the end of the 35-year Japanese occupation of Korea) and the eve of the Korean War, just when Korea had been divided into North and South by its two "liberators"--the United States and the Soviet Union.  Portrayed here is an entire community caught in a political and social firestorm that scathingly reveals the selfishness, cruelty, and ignorance of simple people, but also their loyalty and nobility.  Suh Ji-moon's translations include The Rainy Spell and Other Korean Stories and stories by Sun-won in the 1989 collection The Book of Masks. 

Supervielle

Jules

French

Jules Supervielle.  Naissances/Births [En songeant à un art poétique].  Tr. Philip Cranston.  Scripta Humanistica.  1992.  90 pp.  Cloth: $35.00; ISBN 0-916379-92-2.  Bilingual.  The first of a series of book-length translations of Supervielle.  "I translate Supervielle...for the sheer pleasure, the sheer torment.... The pleasure of holding, weighing, counting out that specie is enough─even if I have failed, by hook or by crook, to make it my own, to play the poet's double, to become...his alter ego.  Or, to return to the metaphor of Supervielle's title:  although most of these births may be miscarriages, a few may survive─or, at least, engender some new poem of mine or of others." (Cranston)  Among the poems included are "Ce pur enfant/Pure Child," "Le Sang/The Blood," "La Malade/The Patient," and "Le Galop souterrain/The Underground Gallop."

 

Swir

Anna

Polish

Anna Swir.  Talking to My Body.  Trs.  Czeslaw Milosz and Leonard Nathan.  Copper Canyon Press/Consortium Book Sales.  1996.  132 pp.  Paper:  $14.00; ISBN 1-55659-108-X.  Open in her feminism and eroticism, Swir's poetry explores the life of the female body from dread to delight, from the depths of agony during World War II to delirious sensual delights, and always with relentless honesty.  Some of the more than 100 poems collected here are "A Cardboard Suitcase," "He Did Not Jump from the Third Floor," "What is a Pineal Gland," "Iron Currycomb," "I Say to My Body:  You Carcass,"  and "I Look with My Eyes Flooded by Tears."  Translator Milosz, winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1980, is the author of dozens of books, including Facing the River, A Year of a Hunter, and Beginning with My Streets.  Nathan is the author of nine volumes of poetry, including Returning Your Call. 

 

Szabó

Magda

Hungarian

Magda Szabó.  The Door [Az Ajtó].  Tr. Stefan Draughon.  East European Monographs, Boulder/Columbia University Press.  1995.  318 pp.  Cloth:  $39.00; ISBN 0-88033-304-9.  The Door is a strong novel about the growing relationship between two women─Magda, a writer, and Emerence, her housekeeper─in the panorama of 20th-century Hungary. Emerence chooses to work for Magda, and a force of literature encounters a force of nature.  Emerence truly has the strength of ten because her heart is pure.  But Emerence has secrets─many secrets.  Gradually Magda pries open the doors of Emerence's past.  What she finds there is horrifying and astounding.  Yet there is humor, too, as the very different women interact with each other and with the dog they adopt.

 

Szewc

Piotr

Polish

Piotr Szewc.  Annihilation [Zagfada].  Tr. Ewa Hryniewicz-Yarbrough.  Dalkey Archive Press.  1993.  107 pp.  Cloth:  $16.95; ISBN 1-56478-034-1.  Annihilation is about a day in the life of a Polish-Jewish town shortly before World War II.  The reader participates in the life of the town instant by instant--from the moment when the local courtesan pours the contents of her chamber pot out her open window up to the moment when the city policemen return to night duty.  For the narrator, every object, every person and event belongs to the world he strives to save from impending annihilation:  the landscape of beer drops left on a counter, the dance of the Hasidim before the Town Hall, the taste of mint drops in an attorney's mouth.  As the minutes on the Town Hall's clock measure the day's passing, a Book of Days writes itself, preserving the town in memory against the ravages of time and history.

 

Szymborska

Wistawa

Polish

Wistawa Szymborska.  View with a Grain of Sand.  Trs.  Stanislaw Bara_czak and Clare Cavanagh.  Harcourt Brace & Company.  1995.  224 pp.  Cloth:  $20.00; ISBN 0-15-100153-7.  Paper:  $12.00; ISBN 0-15-600216-7.  In these hundred poems Szymborska portrays a world in which nature is wise and prodigal and fate unpredictable, if not mischievous.  With an acute irony tempered by a generous curiosity, she documents life's improbability as well as its transient beauty:  the ruins of Troy, sunlight on a pewter jug, birds returning in the spring, the Abominable Snowman lurking in the Himalayas, a bodybuilding contest, the discovery of a new star, the irrationality of love, the infinity of π.  Includes such poems as "Nothing Twice," "Travel Elegy" "Bodybuilder's Contest," "Conversation with a Stone," "Beheading," "Dinosaur Skeleton," and "Cat in an Empty Apartment."  Previous translations of Szymborska's work are People on a Bridge and Sounds, Feelings, Thoughts. 

 

Szymborska

Wislawa

Polish

Wislawa Szymborska. Miracle Fair: Selected Poems of Wislawa Szymborska. Tr. Joanna Trzeciak. New York. W. W. Norton. 2001. 192 pp. Cloth: $24.95; ISBN 0-393-04939-6. This volume features a selection of new translations of the poetry of Nobel Prize-winner Wislawa Szymborska, a substantial number of which have never before appeared in English. Indeed several have been deemed "untranslatable." Previously published poems have been revisited and revised for this collection by Joanna Trzeciak. The works are arranged in six thematic clusters, and the poems within each cluster are arranged chronologically. Trzeciak provides notes to individual poems identifying allusions and references contained in the poems, translation problems and their solutions, and providing a sense of the period in which these poems were written. Szymborska's voice emerges as that of a gentle subversive, self-deprecating in its wit, yet graced with a gift for coaxing the extraordinary out of the ordinary.

 

Szymborska

Wislawa

Polish

Wislawa Szymborska. Poems New and Collected 1957-1997. Tr. Stanisław Barańczak and Clare Cavanagh. San Diego. Harvest/Harcourt. 2000. 296 pp. Paper: $17/00; ISBN 0-15-601146-8. Here is the definitive collection of Wislawa Szymborska's poetry in English translation, comprised of the 100 poems from her popular View with a Grain of Sand, along with 64 additional poems newly translated for this volume. Also included is the poet's 1996 Nobel Prize address. Stanisław Barańczak and Clare Cavanagh share the 1996 PEN Translation Prize for their achievement in rendering Szymborska's work in English. Two previous collections of her poetry are People on a Bridge and Sounds, Feelings, Thoughts: Seventy Poems.

 

Szyper

Adam

Polish

Adam Szyper.   And Suddenly Spring.  Tr. Adam Szyper.  Cross-Cultural Communications.  1992.  48 pp.  Cloth:  $15.00; ISBN 0-89304-859-3.  Paper:  $5.00; ISBN 0-89304-860-7.  Bilingual.  Szyper experienced the Polish ghetto and Auschwitz, but the time he dwells in is only today and tomorrow.  And Suddenly Spring is his first bilingual and fifth poetry collection.

 

Szyszkowitz

Gerald

German

Gerald Szyszkowitz. Murder at the Western Wall Mord vor der Klagemauer]. Tr. Todd C. Hanlin. Riverside, CA. Ariadne Press. 2000 [Edition Va Bene, Wien, 1999]. 134 pp. Paper: $14.50; ISBN 1-57241-087-6. Studies in Austrian Literature, Culture and Thought. Translation Series. On a recent summer day, CNN reporter Ari Schwartz is assassinated in the shadow of Jerusalem's Western Wall. The police have no clues, but Nadja Assad, a reporter colleague, is driven to investigate the mystery and thus becomes the fearless detective in this triple murder whodunit. This is the third of Szyszkowitz's fourteen prose works to be published by Ariadne, including Puntigam, or the Art of Forgetting and On the Other Side. Todd C. Hanlin has translated novels by Anton Fuchs, Gustav Ernst, as well as plays by Szyszkowitz, Felix Mitterer, and Fritz Hochwälder.