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The Political Economy of Terrorism, 2nd ed.
The Political Economy of Terrorism presents a widely accessible political economy approach to the study of terrorism. It applies economic methodology - theoretical and empirical - combined with political analysis and realities to the study of domestic and transnational terrorism. In so doing, the book provides both a qualitative and quantitative investigation of terrorism in a balanced up-to-date presentation that informs students, policymakers, researchers, and the general reader of the current state of knowledge. Included are historical aspects, a discussion of watershed events, the rise of modern-day terrorism, examination of current trends, the dilemma of liberal democracies, evaluation of counterterrorism, analysis of hostage incidents, and much more. Rational-actor models of terrorist and government behavior and game-theoretic analysis are presented for readers with no prior theoretical training. Where relevant, the authors display graphs using data from International Terrorism: Attributes of Terrorist Events (ITERATE), the Global Terrorism Database (GTD), and other public access data sets.

 

Handbook of Defense Economics: Defense in a Globalized World, Vol. 2
The second volume of the Handbook of Defense Economics addresses defense needs, practices, threats, and policies in the modern era of globalization. This new era concerns the enhanced cross-border flows of all kinds (e.g., capital and labor flows, revolutionary rhetoric, guerrillas, and terrorists) including the spillovers of benefits and costs associated with public goods and transnational externalities (i.e., uncompensated interdependencies affecting two or more nations). These ever-increasing flows mean that military armaments and armies are less able to keep out security threats. Thus, novel defense and security barriers are needed to protect borders that are porous to terrorists, pollutants, political upheavals, and conflicts. Even increased trade and financial flows imply novel security challenges and defenses. Globalization also underscores the importance of a new set of institutions (e.g., the European Union and global governance networks) and agents (e.g., nongovernmental organizations and partnerships).

 

The Political Economy of Terrorism
The Political Economy of Terrorism presents a widely accessible political economy approach to the study of terrorism that combines economic methods with political analysis and realities. It applies economic methodology - theoretical and empirical - combined with political analysis to the study of domestic and transnational terrorism. In so doing, the book provides both a qualitative and quantitative investigation of terrorism in a balanced up-to-date presentation that informs students, policymakers, researchers, and the general reader of the current state of knowledge. Included are historical aspects, a discussion of watershed events, the rise of modern-day terrorism, examination of current trends, the dilemma of liberal democracies, evaluation of counterterrorism, analysis of hostage incidents, and much more.

Global Collective Action
This book examines how nations and other key participants in the global community address problems requiring coordinated efforts of two or more entities, that is, collective action. The global community has achieved successes on some issues such as eradicating smallpox, but on others, such as the reduction of drug trafficking, effots to coordinate nations' actions have not been sufficient. This book identifies the factors that promote or inhibit successful collective action at the regional and global level for an evergrowing set of challenges stemming from augmented cross-border flows associated with globalization. The author identifies modern principles of collective action and applies them to a host of global challenges, including promoting global health, providing foreign assistance, controlling rogue nations, limiting transnational terrorism, and intervening in civil wars. Because many of these concerns involve strategic interactions where choices and their consequences are dependent on one's own and others' actions, the book relies, in places, on elementary game theory, which is fully introduced for the uninitiated reader.

Regional Public Goods: Typologies, Provision, Financing, and Development Assistance with Daniel Arce
Pollution, disease, and armed conflicts are examples of problems whose consequences often cross borders. How to combat such ills, especially in poor countries, has in recent years been intensely debated in terms of promoting global public goods.
This study contributes to the debate through its focus on regional public goods (RPGs), a focus that has received much less attention than the provision of public goods at the global level. Through the means of typology, Daniel G. Arce M. and Todd Sandler identify several classes of RPGs. The incentives to efficiently provide a public good depend on the good's class. Some RPGs can be efficiently provided with little public intervention while others pose real public policy concerns.
The financing of RPGs for development and povery reduction is addressed. The authors emphasize that the funds for RPGs for development are limited. At the same time, many RPGs, relating to important areas like the environment and health, are particularly suitable for provision at the regional level. Donors should therefore give more support to regional institutions. Under certain conditions, these donors should also pursue partnerships with actors such as private companies and nongovernmental organizations. Networks and other institutional arrangements are discussed.

Economic Concepts for the Social Sciences
The primary purpose of this book is to present some of the key economic concepts that have guided economic thinking in the last century and to identify which of these concepts will continue to direct economic thought in the coming decades. This book is written in an accessible manner and is intended for a wide audience with little or no formal training in economics. It should also interest economists who want to reflect on the direction of the discipline and learn concepts and achievements in other subfields. The author imparts his enthusiasm for the economic way of reasoning and its wide applicability. Through the abundant use of illustrations and examples, the author makes concepts understandable and relevant. Topics covered include game theory, the new institutional economics, market failures, asymmetric information, endogenous growth theory, general equilibrium, rational expectations, and others.

The Future of Development Assistance: Common Pools and International Public Goods with Ravi Kanbur and Kevin M. Morrison
Development assistance is beset by two challenges: its past ineffectivennes in achieving the ojectives of development an dpoverty reduction, and the emergence of a range of transnational problems affecting both developed and developing countries. How can aid be delid more efectively? And how can it assist in international public goods which solve transnational problems? In this essay, the authors propose a twofold framework to guide development assistance: and approach to country-focused aid that would minimize coordination difficulties and enhance recipient country ownership, and a nuanced scheme for the provision of international public goods.

The Political Economy of NATO with Keith Hartley
Using simple economic methods while accounting for political and institutional factors, this book puts forward a political economy viewpoint of NATO's current status and its future prospects. A balanced picture of NATO is presented that is sensitive to the perspectives from both sides of the Atlantic. This is accomplished by accounting for the institutional features and the philsophical aspects that distinguish government decision makers and the defense establishment in North America from their counterparts in Europe. A host of NATO policy concerns are addressed, including th eoptimal membership for the alliance, its role in peacekeeping missions worldwide, the appropriate methods for deterring terrorism, and proper procurement practices for the next generation of weapons. Additional topics concern defense burden sharing, arms trade, NATO's institutional structure, and NATO's role vis--vis other international organizations. Although the analysis is rigorous, the book is intended for a wide audience drawn from political science and economics.

Global Challenges
Using simple economic reasongin, this book analyzes a broad range of global challencluding obal warming, ozone shield depletion, acid rain, nuclear waste disposal, revolution dispersion, international terrorism, disease eradiction, poppulation growth, tropical deforestation, and peacemaking. These challenges are put into perspective in terms of scientific, economic, and political considerations. Many of the problems are shown to be solvable of reduceable without much explicit coordination among nations. Although there is no single panacea for the challenges, much can be done to tailor solutions. This book is intended for a wide audience drawn from the social and policy sciences, including economics, environmental studies, political science, sociology, and public policy. It should also interest the general reader who wants to learn about global challenges.

The Theory of Externalities, Public Goods and Club Goods with Richard Cornes
This book presents a theoretical treatment of externalities (i.e., uncompensated interdependencies), public goods, and club goods. The new edition updates and expands the discussion of externalities and their implications, coverage of asymmetric information, underlying game-theoretic formulations, and intuitive and graphic presentations. Aimed at well prepared undergraduates and graduate students making a serious foray into this branch of economics, the analysis should interest professional economists wishing to survey recent advances in the field. No other single source for the range of materials explored is currently available. Topics investigated include Nash equilibrium, Lindahl equilibria club theory, the preference-revelation mechanishm, Pigouvian taxes, the commons, the Coase Theorem, and static and repeated games.

The Economics of Defense with Keith Hartley
The economics of defense provides a comprehensive evaluation of the literature in an up-to-date, unified survey. The authors apply both microeconomic and macroeconomic methods of analysis, including static opitimization, growth theory, dynamic optimization, comparative statics, game theory, and econometrics. The book includes chapters on the study of arms races, alliances and burden sharing, economic warfare, the arms trade, weapon procurement policies, defense and development, defense industries, arms control agreements, disarmament, and conversion.

Collective Action
In Collective Action Todd Sandler synthesizes what has been learned about collective action since the 1965 publication of the groundbreaking study The Logic of Collective Action by Mancur Olson. Examining the validity of Olsonian themes and propositions through a wealth of examples drawn from a variety of fields, Professor Sandler explains the forces behind collective action successes and failures. He concludes that while none of Olson's propositions is true in general, most are valid in many cases that correspond to important real-world scenarios.

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