Faculty


Deborah Stott



Associate Professor Emeritus



Area:  HUAS
Areas of Specialization:  Renaissance art history, Renaissance women's history

Office:  N/A
Email:  [email protected]


I came to UTD in the fall of 1976, the year after the Arts and Humanities programs opened, and taught art history and women's history full-time until the fall of 2008. As a retired Associate Professor Emerita, I have occasionally taught courses in these fields and continue to pursue research.

My current research project combines women's history and art history and is provisionally entitled "Cornelia Collonello: Search for a Renaissance Woman." Using her own letters and other archival material that I have discovered, I am reconstructing the life of a working-class woman in sixteenth-century Italy and situating it within the social context of her time. Cornelia was the widow of a man who had served the artist Michelangelo for 25 years. Michelangelo accepted legal responsibility for the man's children and conscientiously oversaw their financial affairs for more than four years. During that time, 1557-1562, Cornelia corresponded with the artist about her own and her sons' affairs, and the 28 extant letters represent a unique resource for the life of a non-elite woman in her own words. My analysis of the letters is supplemented and expanded by unpublished material on Cornelia and her family that I have found in the archives of Rome and Urbania, her home town.

This project has resulted in several lectures and publications. I have been invited by the director of the Biblioteca e Civico Museo di Urbania, Dott. Feliciano Paoli, to contribute a monograph to their series "Le collezioni di Casteldurante dai Della Rovere agli Ubaldini" ("Collections of Casteldurante from the Della Rovere to the Ubaldini"). It will be published in both English and Italian. Ultimately, I will publish a monograph that will make a contribution both to early modern history, especially women's and family history and gender studies, and also to our understanding of Michelangelo as a complex social being, a true man of his time.

I have always enjoyed teaching and working with students, but at UTD, I have particularly welcomed the opportunity to work with students who have chosen to return to school after pursuing other experiences.

Before UTD, I taught at Hunter College, Wheaton College in Massachusetts, and the Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies in Rome.

Recent Courses:  View courses taught by Deborah Stott


Work Samples and Publications:  I have presented several invited lectures on the topic of my current research and have also contributed a chapter to a recent book on early modern women's letters:

  • "'I'm the same Cornelia I've always been': Reading Cornelia Collonello's Letters to Michelangelo." Women's Letters Across Europe, 1400-1700: Form and Persuasion. Ed. Jane Couchman and Ann Crabb. Aldershot & Brookfield, VT: Ashgate Publishing. 2005. 79-102.

 


Education: 
B.A. Wellesley College, 1964
M.A. Columbia University, 1966
Ph.D. Columbia University, 1975

Curriculum Vitae:  Deborah Stott's CV

Website(s):  Homepage of Deborah Stott