Events

With a panel of leading experts in the field of academic publishing, UT Dallas is starting a conversation on the current and future trends of knowledge curation.

The colloquium will be Monday, April 20th in UT Dallas’ Edith O’Donnell Arts and Technology Building room 1.201 from noon to 1 p.m.

Nick Lindsay, journals director at MIT Press, will head the conversation. With his experience managing both day-to-day operations and strategic initiatives at MIT Press, Lindsay will speak about the evolving scholarly communications ecosystem.

Before joining MIT Press, Lindsay serves as journals director at The University of California Press in Berkley. He is also a graduate of New York University’s Summer Publishing Institute, an intense, six-week study of book, magazine and digital publishing.

 

Other panelists include:

Dr. Roger Malina, Arts and Technology Distinguished Chair at UT Dallas. ATEC Prof Roger Malina, Executive Editor of the Leonardo Publications at MIT Press, will talk about the experimental publishing initiative in the ArtSciLab including the Creative Disturbance scholarly podcast platform and the living ebook series at MIT press. He will discuss strategies on how to capture the growing ‘grey literature’ which is having an increasing impact on scholarly publishing in the art, science and technology field.

 

Dr. Rainer Schulte, the Katherine R. Cecil Professor of Foreign Languages at UT Dallas. In 1978, Schulte co-founded the American Literary Translators Association (ALTA), whose national office is also located at UT Dallas. Through his editorial work, as well as through his own publications on the art and craft of translation, he has raised the visibility of translation in the United States and has been instrumental in promoting literary translation at other universities.

 

Dr. Maximilian Schich, associate professor of arts and technology (ATEC) at UT Dallas. Schich works and collaborates to converge art history, information visualization, computer science and physics to understand cultural history as a complex system. Schich is the organizing chair of the ongoing NetSci symposia series on arts, humanities and complex networks, as well as an editorial advisor at Leonardo journal.

Dr. Rosanna Guadagno, associate professor in emerging media and communication and associate professor of psychology at UT Dallas. Her research interests focus on the confluence of three main areas: Social Influence in Mediated Contexts; Psychological Processes in Social Media, Video Games, and Virtual Environments; Gender Roles. Guadagno is an expert blogger for Psychology Today, is on the editorial board for Basic and Applied Social Psychology and CyberPsychology, Behavior, & Social Networking, and is an associate editor for the International Journal of Interactive Communication Systems and Technologies.


Norma Martin, director of editorial services at Texas Christian University; editor, The TCU Magazine; editor, Endeavors. Martin serves as director of editorial services, which includes the publication operations of The TCU Magazine and its website. She also oversees publication of Endeavors magazine as well as the Marketing and Communication’s photo archives. Prior to joining TCU, Norma spent 27 years working for daily newspapers, the last 12 years in newsroom management positions. She is a two-time fellow of the Nieman Foundation’s Narrative Editors seminar at Harvard University.

 

Students and faculty in the School of Arts and Humanities, including Arts and Technology and Emerging Media and Communication, as well as participants from the School of Engineering & Computer Science and the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences, invite the campus and surrounding community to experience current research and examples of student productivity, especially those that include an interactive, multi-modal experience.  Students have embraced the Edith O'Donnell Arts & Technology Building as a vehicle for exhibition and public engagement as they take their current projects from the classroom into a public arena in this first annual art and technology festival, ART FAIR 2015.  Projects range from video art to 3D fabrication, from data visualization to large scale painting, from animation to interactive games, from soundscapes to experiences combining neuroscience, astronomy and geological data. Events include a lecture on STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Mathematics), and presentations on motion capture, sound design, and animation.

Exhibitions and presentations will be on view May 1, 2015 from 12:00 p.m. noon until 5:00 p.m., in the Edith O’Donnell Arts & Technology Building on the University of Texas at Dallas campus.

 

FIRST FLOOR

First Floor Lobby:
Reception 4:30 – 6:00 pm
Join faculty and students to celebrate the first annual UT-Dallas ART FAIR!

Lecture Hall:  
12:00 pm – 1:30 pm   
Animation         
Faculty sponsors:  Todd Fechter, Eric Farrar, Sean McComber, Midori Kitagawa, Kyoung Swearingen

Lecture Hall:  
1:30 pm – 2:30 pm  
Making Computing Content using STEAM Power” 
Paul Fishwick
Artists are pioneers when it comes to technology. They are the first to explore, and critique, new modes of personal expression through diverse media.  When it comes to computing, the natural bridge to art is for the artist to employ computing technology as a new medium. This practice has been, and continues to be, very successful. We cross the bridge connecting art and computing by starting at the other end.  What if computing artifacts are guided or informed by art ad arts practice? Is it possible for a sculpture to be both an artistic product and a computing product simultaneously? I suggest that we can do this and I'll provide specific examples. The STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Mathematics) movement provides impetus for this novel approach.

Lecture Hall:  
2:30 pm – 4:00 pm
Animation
4:00  -  4:30 pm   Presentation by Animation Faculty
Faculty sponsors:  Todd Fechter, Eric Farrar, Sean McComber, Midori Kitagawa, Kyoung Swearingen

Lecture Hall:  
4:30  -  4:45 pm
Exhibition of the hall's sound system capabilities: LARES acoustic beam forming reverb and new ATEC 7.1 Demonstration mixes
Faculty sponsor: Scot Gresham-Lancaster

Lecture Hall Lobby Open Space
Virtual Environments, Environment Art, Interactive Art, Level Design, Games
01. Everyone Hates You - Carrie Crossley
02. Untitled Kelly Weeren
03. Untitled Whitebox - Scott Swearingen, Dean Soeder
04. GameLab: Return To Color - Sarah Buxkamper (Creative Director)
05GameLab: Push And Pull - Michael Stewart (Creative Director)
06. Abstractness - Vincent Lo
07. Untitled Robert Leeper
08. Untitled - Chris Venable
09. V.E.C.T. Addison Stiles  
Faculty sponsor: Scott Swearingen

Lecture Hall Lobby Wall Areas
Graduate student large-scale paintings
Faculty sponsor: John Pomara

MoCap Lab  1.801A
MoCap demonstrations
Faculty sponsor: Midori Katagawa0

3D Fabrication Lab 1.910 
3D Fabrication exhibition
Faculty sponsor: Andrew Scott

Edith O’Donnell Building Entrance/ Foyer
Quad QSC soundscape 
Faculty sponsor: Scot Gresham-Lancaster

Large Interactive Screen Monitor (near 1.305)
Faculty sponsor: Paul Fishwick
Being Different
As a society, we celebrate conformance and diversity at the same time. When should we be diverse? When should we conform to social norms. The core elements of diversity and conformance are found in Galton’s 19th century mechanical apparatus, called a “Galton Board”. Our Galton Board is represented as a electromechanical kinetic sculpture that conveys both conformance and diversity. These terms have meanings in probability and statistics, where being “normal” is conveyed by adherence to central tendency (e.g., the mean value), however art is often born from diversity and challenging the norm (e.g., distribution tails).

Rock, Paper Scissors: Japan and Myth in the 19th century
In a print by Kikukawa Eizan in 1820, three geisha are playing a variant of rock-paper-scissors (kitsune-ken), which we played as children in another form.  There is a related myth involving a fox, a village head, and a hunter. We present an interactive and engaging representation of this cultural phenomenon using computer graphics, enhanced computing methods involving pixel shading, and a large high resolution display surface.

Edith O’Donnell Gallery
Faculty sponsor: Paul Fishwick
Eating Each Other: An Endless Cycle
This will be a physical exhibition in two parts: a water computer that requires standard 115VAC power, and a micro-controller based kinetic sculpture. Both parts are models of the predator-prey Lotka-Volterra equations. These equations represent a constant cycle of interaction between those who eat and those who are eaten. An endless cycle of predation. The exhibit is an interplay between elements of art, design, ecology, computing, and mathematics.

Edith O’Donnell Gallery
“Sticks and Stones: Experiences of Microaggressions Among UTD Students”
Tina Nguyen
Faculty sponsor:  Kristin Drogos

Edith O’Donnell Gallery
video games for mobile gaming / demonstration
Tonio Loewald 
Faculty sponsor:  Rosanna Guadagno

Edith O’Donnell Gallery Annex
New media installation piece
Luke Harden
Faculty sponsor: John Pomara

 

SECOND FLOOR

TBD
Re-Imagining Alchemy
This is an installation-based artwork that presents my research based on alchemical themes and processes. Alchemy has captured my fascination, not to look at the Myths as reality, but as a source of aesthetic, process and creative inspiration.
Val Curry
Faculty sponsor: Greg Metz

 

THIRD FLOOR

Third Floor Open Areas
Electronically-Integrated Structures
Faculty sponsor: Paul Fishwick

ATC 3.205    ARTSCILAB 
Art Performances of Scientific Data
The ArtSciLab (ATC 3.209) will be showing a number of projects by artists and scientists working in the lab including the data stethoscope and other projects that offer multimodal experiences of neuroscience, astronomy and geological data. We will also show a sound work of a sheet of nano-tubes emitting sound. 
Faculty sponsor:  Roger Malina

Large Screen Monitor, adjacent to ATEC office, ATC 3.105
Pseudoscience (video #01, paper plates),  video, 1:35m
Twyla Bloxham
Pseudoscience (video 01#, paper plates ) simulates the proliferation of cells through repetition of a single photographic element, a paper plate. The paper plates are blurred and altered in size to interrogate the visual conventions used to present scientific truth, prompting recollection of our first experiences observing the generation of life under the microscope. 
The video is part of larger body of work consisting of humorous and playful depictions of the everyday reexamined in a new and disorienting context. This body of work facilitates dialogue regarding the authenticity of the photographic medium, re-contextualization, the concept of originality in contemporary art, as well as science as a tool to understand and categorize the natural world. 
Faculty sponsor: Marilyn Waligore

Third Floor Hallway, opposite to 3.301 / 3.305
Selected Works in Cultural Science
Large scale visualization panels produced by researchers and students associated with the Cultural Science Lab
Faculty sponsor: Maximilian Schich

Abstract: Philip Beesley will present recent work by the Living Architecture group that  offers a new set of design paradigms. The presentation will suggest that conception of buildings can move from classical ideas of a static world of closed boundaries toward the expanded physiology and dynamic form of a metabolism. Working with artists, engineers and scientists, Beesley’s Living Architecture research group combines the crafts of lightweight textile structures and mechanisms, dense arrays of distributed computer controls with machine learning, and early systems of artificial-life chemistry. 

Biography:

Philip Beesley is a professor in the School of Architecture at the University of Waterloo. A practitioner of architecture and digital media art, he was educated in visual art at Queen’s University, in technology at Humber College, and in architecture at the University of Toronto. At Waterloo he serves as Director for the Integrated Group for Visualization, Design and Manufacturing, and as Director for Riverside Architectural Press.

Previous Events

Wednesday, February 26,  7:00 PM 
Venue: ATEC Lecture Hall 
Ticket: Free 
Season: 2013-14

The Metroplex Technology Business Council Lecture - Presented by The Dallas Morning News


Christian Belady, general manager of Data Center Services for Microsoft’s Global Foundation Services and a UT Dallas alumnus, will speak at the Feb. 26 lecture. He oversees all aspects of Microsoft’s global data center network, including the expansion of new data centers and the development of new standards in energy efficiency that have been adopted across the industry. Belady earned a master’s degree at UT Dallas in 1990 and received the University’s Distinguished Alumni Award in 2010.

About the Lecture Series

The University of Texas at Dallas proudly introduces the new Arts and Technology Distinguished Lecture Series.

Hosted by UT Dallas’ Arts and Technology (ATEC) program, the series features speakers from a wide range of backgrounds in science, technology and art. They will present public lectures on topics aimed at exploring the evolving relationships among art, technology, engineering and behavioral and social sciences.

The new Edith O’Donnell Arts and Technology Building will be the lecture series’ home, offering audience members a view into the creative environment that serves to advance UT Dallas’ work at the research and educational frontiers of these coalescing disciplines.

 

Tickets

Ticket prices are $15 for seats on the lower level and $10 for the upper level. Purchase tickets online.

 

Parking

The University of Texas at Dallas is at 800 W. Campbell Road in Richardson, Texas.
Guests attending the lecture can enter campus from Campbell Road. Head north on University Parkway and 
turn right onto Armstrong Drive. Turn right onto East Drive, then left on Drive A to reach Parking Structure One. 

Directions to campus here.
Download parking map here.

 



For more information contact:
Deborah Day
debday@utdallas.edu
972-883-6504 

Patrons with disabilities who need special assistance, such as an interpreter or captioning, to attend this presentation should contact us no later than 72 hours prior to the presentation.
Wednesday, March 26,  7:00 PM 
Venue: ATEC Lecture Hall 
Ticket: Free 
Season: 2013-14

The Ericsson Lecture - Presented by The Dallas Morning News


Vint Cerf, recognized as one of the “fathers of the Internet” and vice president and chief Internet evangelist at Google, will speak on March 26. Cerf has received such honors as the National Medal of Technology, the Turing Award, and the Presidential Medal of Freedom for his role in the creation of the Internet. In his work at Google, Cerf identifies and promotes new technologies used to develop Internet-based products and services.

About the Lecture Series

The University of Texas at Dallas proudly introduces the new Arts and Technology Distinguished Lecture Series.

Hosted by UT Dallas’ Arts and Technology (ATEC) program, the series features speakers from a wide range of backgrounds in science, technology and art. They will present public lectures on topics aimed at exploring the evolving relationships among art, technology, engineering and behavioral and social sciences.

The new Edith O’Donnell Arts and Technology Building will be the lecture series’ home, offering audience members a view into the creative environment that serves to advance UT Dallas’ work at the research and educational frontiers of these coalescing disciplines.

 

Tickets

Ticket prices are $15 for seats on the lower level and $10 for the upper level. Purchase tickets online.

 

Parking

The University of Texas at Dallas is at 800 W. Campbell Road in Richardson, Texas.
Guests attending the lecture can enter campus from Campbell Road. Head north on University Parkway and 
turn right onto Armstrong Drive. Turn right onto East Drive, then left on Drive A to reach Parking Structure One. 

Directions to campus here.
Download parking map here.

 



For more information contact:
Deborah Day
debday@utdallas.edu
972-883-6504 

Patrons with disabilities who need special assistance, such as an interpreter or captioning, to attend this presentation should contact us no later than 72 hours prior to the presentation.
Wednesday, April 16,  7:00 PM 
Venue: ATEC Lecture Hall 
Ticket: Free 
Season: 2013-14

The Northwood Woman’s Club Lecture - Presented by The Dallas Morning News


Mae Jemison, a chemical engineer, scientist, physician, entrepreneur, teacher and astronaut, will speak on April 16. She was the first African-American woman to enter NASA’s astronaut corps and flew aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1992. Jemison is multi-lingual, trained in dance and choreography, and recognized nationally as an advocate for advancing STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) education for children.

About the Lecture Series

The University of Texas at Dallas proudly introduces the new Arts and Technology Distinguished Lecture Series.

Hosted by UT Dallas’ Arts and Technology (ATEC) program, the series features speakers from a wide range of backgrounds in science, technology and art. They will present public lectures on topics aimed at exploring the evolving relationships among art, technology, engineering and behavioral and social sciences.

The new Edith O’Donnell Arts and Technology Building will be the lecture series’ home, offering audience members a view into the creative environment that serves to advance UT Dallas’ work at the research and educational frontiers of these coalescing disciplines.

 

Tickets

Ticket prices are $15 for seats on the lower level and $10 for the upper level. Purchase tickets online.

 

Parking

The University of Texas at Dallas is at 800 W. Campbell Road in Richardson, Texas.
Guests attending the lecture can enter campus from Campbell Road. Head north on University Parkway and 
turn right onto Armstrong Drive. Turn right onto East Drive, then left on Drive A to reach Parking Structure One. 

Directions to campus here.
Download parking map here.

 

 



For more information contact:
Deborah Day
debday@utdallas.edu
972-883-6504 

Patrons with disabilities who need special assistance, such as an interpreter or captioning, to attend this presentation should contact us no later than 72 hours prior to the presentation.
Wednesday, January 22,  7:00 PM 
Venue: ATEC Lecture Hall 
Ticket: Varies 
Season: 2013-14

The Susan and Ron Nash Lecture - Presented by The Dallas Morning News


Robert Edsel, writer of the acclaimed book, The Monuments Men: Allied Heroes, Nazi Thieves and the Greatest Treasure Hunt in History, will kick off the lecture series on Jan. 22. Edsel’s book follows the efforts of a special Allied force – comprised of art historians, curators and architects – with a mission of tracking and retrieving art, historic documents and other cultural treasures stolen by the Nazis during World War II. Actor and director George Clooney’s movie, The Monuments Men is based on Edsel’s book and is scheduled to premiere on Feb. 7.

About the Lecture Series

The University of Texas at Dallas proudly introduces the new Arts and Technology Distinguished Lecture Series.

Hosted by UT Dallas’ Arts and Technology (ATEC) program, the series features speakers from a wide range of backgrounds in science, technology and art. They will present public lectures on topics aimed at exploring the evolving relationships among art, technology, engineering and behavioral and social sciences.

The new Edith O’Donnell Arts and Technology Building will be the lecture series’ home, offering audience members a view into the creative environment that serves to advance UT Dallas’ work at the research and educational frontiers of these coalescing disciplines.

 

Tickets

Ticket prices are $15 for seats on the lower level and $10 for the upper level. Purchase tickets online.

 

Parking

The University of Texas at Dallas is at 800 W. Campbell Road in Richardson, Texas.
Guests attending the lecture can enter campus from Campbell Road. Head north on University Parkway and 
turn right onto Armstrong Drive. Turn right onto East Drive, then left on Drive A to reach Parking Structure One. 

Directions to campus here.
Download parking map here.

 



For more information contact:
Deborah Day
debday@utdallas.edu
972-883-6504 

Patrons with disabilities who need special assistance, such as an interpreter or captioning, to attend this presentation should contact us no later than 72 hours prior to the presentation.

ARS Research Colloquia Series of the UT Dallas ATEC/EMAC Programs

Art Rendevous Science

Presents:

Art-Science Collaboration as an Opportunity for Social Change - Perspectives and Experiments from a South African Art Activist

Marcus Neustetter will be sharing his experience as a media artist from a context in which he constantly questions his relevance as an artist and his interest to respond to his environment and its needs. Presenting a series of personal and collaborative projects, he will illustrate some of the challenges working with scientists and technology in a third world environment through low-tech socially engaged processes and personal artist experiments. With these he attempts to find some possible solutions and make sense of his own roles and responsibilities to affect change.

Johannesburg based artist, cultural activist and producer, Marcus Neustetter, reflects critically and playfully on his context through his art and collaborative projects. His practice has ranged from socially engaged public art projects to his personal exploration of the intersection of art, science and technology for the past 15 years that has shifted between gallery and museum installations and exhibitions in major international centres to performing in archeological dig sites, meteorite impact craters, astronomical observatories and transforming African urban centres. Mostly process driven, his production of art at the intersection of art, science and technology has led him to work in a multi-disciplinary approach from conventional drawings to permanent and temporary site specific installations, mobile and virtual interventions and socially engaged projects internationally. He has exhibited extensively in different parts of Europe, Africa and North America. In partnership with Stephen Hobbs, Neustetter, as the co-director of The Trinity Session, has innovated in the cultural industry, public art, and socially engaged practice in South Africa.

Eric Farrar, Assistant Professor

Exploring Applications for Non-narrative Animation

Abstract:  This talk will feature work being done on an ongoing collaborative research project between ATEC, Computer Science, BBS and the Callier Center for Communication Disorders.  The project utilizes motion capture technology along with tools and techniques normally used in film and game production to create a clinical tool for speech therapy.  The talk will explore additional uses and applications for 3D animation in non-narrative capacities.

Bio:  Eric Farrar is an Assistant Professor of Computer Animation in the Arts and Technology (ATEC) program at UT Dallas.  With a background in music and visual communication design, he completed an MFA in Computer Animation and Visualization working through the Advanced Computing Center for Art and Design (ACCAD) at The Ohio State University. He then went to work for the Los Angeles based visual-effects studio, Rhythm & Hues where he worked as a character rigger, creating bone and muscle systems for digital characters.  Films on which he worked include Night at the Museum and The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, Witch and the Wardrobe.  Eric is currently teaching courses in 3D animation including the Animation Production Studio course as well as courses focused on character rigging, which introduce students to some of the more technical elements of preparing 3D models for animation.

Art & Invention

by

Michael Naimark

Abstract:  Artists and designers sometimes invent - new processes, media, or technologies - in the name of realizing their work. Invention isn't the primary motivation, and the works are often clunky, frugal, and just barely working (but working!). Broader, practical, or commercial applications are usually far from the artist's mind. Meanwhile, and perhaps ironically, large research and commercial institutions spend billions of dollars per year on invention, often in the same arenas. So the critical question is: how do artists fit in? We will explore this question - and such issues as control and compromise; ownership and intellectual property; time horizon and profitability; and cultural consequence and hegemony - mining my art projects and experiences for lessons learned.

Biography:  Michael Naimark is a media artist and researcher who's been blessed (and sometimes cursed) with an uncanny track record of art projects presaging widespread adoption, often by decades. He is noted in the histories of Google Street ViewProjection Mapping, and Virtual Reality (and, some claim, the Facebook Like Button); and in ongoing work with cinematic crowdsourcinglive global video, and cultural heritage. Michael's immersive and interactive art installations have exhibited internationally and are in the permanent collections of American Museum of the Moving Image, the Exploratorium, and the ZKM Center for Arts and Media. He was the recipient of the World Technology Award for the Arts in 2002 and was guest curator at Ars Electronica in 2004 and 2009. In recent years he's served as faculty at USC Cinema, NYU Art, and the MIT Media Lab.

We announce a special ATEC colloquium on Monday, October 13, starting at noon.   Location: ATC 3.914

These speakers are attending The Society for Literature, Science and the Arts Conference in Dallas on October 9-12 and have agreed to speak on this day for a special ATEC Colloquium.

Wendy Silk: Engaging Undergraduates in Environmental Sciences Via the Arts - She is Professor Emerita and Distinguished ArtScientist in the Department of Land, Air, and Water Resources at the University of California at Davis and involved in the campus ArtScience Fusion Program.  Her talk will review results of a networking grant from the National Science Foundation and describe how students learn environmental science through songwriting and performance.

Jack Ox: Fluxus/Fluid Coursing through an artist-scientist who came after: A Cognitive analysis of Rich Gold’s Interdisciplinary work. - She is an Associate Research Professor, Department of Music, College of Fine Arts, University of New Mexico

David Familian: Disrupting the Mirro: New Interfaces/Embodied Experiences - Artistic Director, Beall Center for the Arts, University of California Irvine

Algorithmic and Aesthetics – On Digital Images

Frieder Nake

University of Bremen & University of the Arts Bremen, Germany

Abstract: Computer art is now about 50 years old. As in McLuhan’s famous slogan, its early attempts were examples of the medium being the message. The algorithmic principle, essence of computing science, became the driving force for this approach to art. We will review important events and examples of the first years of computer art. It established itself as a very special aspect of conceptual art. Only with interactive art, however, digital art gained enough of autonomy and started formulating its own aesthetic questions. We will take a look at generative aesthetics, and show some, perhaps surprising, connections to the broad stream of art history, e.g. Monet, Mondrian, Pollock, Albers, Götz, G. Richter.

Biography:  Frieder Nake is a mathematician who happens to be called an artist, but a computer scientist as well. The second is trivial, the first not quite. He has done early pioneering work in computer art. He is a professor of interactive computer graphics and digital media, teaching at the University of Bremen, Germany, and the University of the Arts Bremen. He has taught in Canada for some years, and many more countries, Norway and China among them. He was recently one of many nominees for the new Visionary Pioneer of Media Art award of Prix Ars Electronica.