FACULTY

kak102020@utdallas.edu
972-883-4346
ATC 1.903

On the Web

KimKnight.com
The Spiral Dance
Fashioning Circuits

Courses

View courses taught by Kim Knight


Areas of Specialization

Media studies; digital humanities; network cultures and technologies; emerging media; viral media; gender and digital media

Kim Knight

Assistant Professor


Kim Knight is an Assistant Professor of Emerging Media and Communication at the University of Texas at Dallas. Her research broadly centers on the ways digital culture affects negotiations of power and the formation of identity. More specifically, her current work on viral media addresses the role of digital media as it circulates outside of broadcast paradigms and empowers or oppresses subjects in network society. She also has multiple research projects in progress on the topic of gendered identity and digital media. One of the fundamental strategies of her research methodology is to bring together the vectors of theory and practice. As such, her work uniquely blends traditional modes of scholarship with the production of theoretically-informed media objects.

Kim teaches classes in digital media theory, the shift from analog to digital textuality, viral media, wearable media, and race, class, gender, and sexuality in digital environments. Her classes center on the same hybrid approach of theorizing and making that underlies her research.

Kim writes and is editor-in-chief for the blog The Spiral Dance (http://thespiraldance.wordpress.com). The title is taken from the closing line of Donna Haraway's influential essay "Manifesto for Cyborgs" and the blog critically addresses the intersections of media, technology, and gendered identity. In addition, she is the project leader, site administrator, and editor of Fashioning Circuits (http://fashioningcircuits.com), a research blog and public humanities project that addresses the social and cultural implications of the intersection between fashion and technology. In addition, the Fashioning Circuits project works with community partners to develop programming to introduce non-programmers to coding and making in a Humanities context. A book on Fashioning Circuits is under contract and forthcoming in 2016.

Kim is active in university and public service and is regularly invited to give talks on women and technology, social and wearable media, and Digital Humanities.

Education

PhD, English, University of California Santa Barbara, 2011
MA with distinction, English Literature, California State University Northridge, 2004
BA, English Literature, California State University Northridge, 2001