The University of Texas at Dallas School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences

IN PRINT AND ON AIR

In Print & On Air includes current, general interest media coverage of BBS students, faculty, staff and leadership and their achievements. Archives of previous articles back to 2015 are also available.


Architectural Record

Brain Performance Institute by Page

Jul 10, 2018

“This is the very front part of our brain that makes us different from every other living thing. Architecturally, we created what we stand for.” — Dr. Sandra Bond Chapman, Dee Wyly Distinguished University Chair and professor and founder and chief director at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences’ Center for BrainHealth. READ MORE


Relief: Pain, Research News

Researchers Create a Game Plan to Study and Treat Chronic Pain

Jul 2, 2018

“The concept of simply calling it ‘chronic pain’ after six months is not useful, and it has probably been detrimental to effectively treating patients.” — Dr. Theodore Price, associate professor of neuroscience at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences. READ MORE


Dallas News

Want to Lower Your Risk of Depression and Dying From Heart Disease? Do This

Jun 29, 2018

“We have shown it is important to be physically fit AND cognitively fit for psychological well being. Thus, if you do have a cardiovascular event, you are better protected against the potential detrimental effects on the brain, such as depression, memory and concentration deficits.” — Dr. Sandra Bond Chapman, Dee Wyly Distinguished University Chair and professor and founder and chief director at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences’ Center for BrainHealth. READ MORE


Healthline

Are Your Kid’s Headphones Permanently Damaging Their Hearing?

Jun 27, 2018

“Auditory fatigue, from listening through earbuds for many hours, even at a comfortable volume, can also cause tinnitus, said Jackie Clark. She thinks that this may be the result of simply not letting the ears rest in true quiet for long enough periods of time. Though, she points out, there are a number of reasons why a person can develop tinnitus.” — Jackie Clark, clinical professor at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences and president of the American Academy of Audiology. READ MORE


Wilson County News

Preschool Age a Crucial Time for Kids’ Eating Habits

Jun 27, 2018

“It’s during this period that most children develop eating habits that override their natural body cues. Very young kids are really good at regulating food intake. If you give a 3-year old a snack, they will adjust their meal intake to react appropriately so that they are not too hungry or too full.” — Dr. Shayla Holub, associate professor and program head, Psychological Sciences, Psychology and Child Learning and Development. READ MORE


AIA Dallas

Detail Matters: Brain Power

Jun 25, 2018

“The organic form is inspired by the shape of the brain’s frontal lobe, while the detailing of the fins is reminiscent of the lines on an electroencephalogram (EEG), a scan used to identify problems related to brain function by measuring electrical activity.” — Opened in September 2017, the Brain Performance Institute is part of the Center for BrainHealth at UT Dallas. READ MORE


Eurek Alert

Center for BrainHealth® Joins Neuroscape Alliance

Jun 26, 2018

“We are pleased to participate in the Neuroscape Alliance with the common goal of speeding up progress in developing science-based assessments and interventions to benefit humanity.” — Dr. Lara Ashmore, director of emerging technologies and online programs at the UT Dallas Center for Brainhealth’s Brain Performance Institute. READ MORE


NPR

The Science Behind South Korea’s Race-Based World Cup Strategy

Jun 18, 2018

“So, it has been known since the late sixties, actually, that humans, given a task to learn new faces and to recognize them at a later date, are simply more accurate when the faces they’re trying to learn and remember are faces of their own race, as opposed to faces of another race.” — Dr. Alice O’Toole, Aage and Margareta Moller Professor and professor of neuroscience. READ MORE


Dallas News

Sachse Man with Autism Helps Design Virtual World to Make Life Better for Adults Like Him

Jun 16, 2018

Kyle Barton, a UTD graduate from the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences, with a BS in Psychology, is an instructor at the nonPareil Institute, a Plano-based nonprofit that teaches adults with autism job skills such as coding and video game design. READ MORE


The Washington Post

Five Myths About Alzheimer’s Disease

Jun 15, 2018

“There is growing evidence, however, that Alzheimer’s disease begins its attack on the brain many years before such symptoms appear, leading researchers to suggest that there is a syndrome called preclinical Alzheimer’s disease.” — Dr. Denise C. Park, Distinguished University Chair in Behavioral and Brain Sciences and director of research at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences’ Center for Vital Longevity. READ MORE


Dallas Innovates

Concussions: Retired NFLers, Head Injury Patients May Benefit from New Brain Health Initiatives

Jun 5, 2018

Researchers at the Brain Performance Institute of the Center for BrainHealth have developed programs to unlock the brain potential for a wide variety of individuals — from middle schoolers and athletes to military veterans and individuals with Alzheimer’s disease. READ MORE


Parkinson’s News Today

Parkinson’s Disease Shares Brainwave Abnormalities with Other Neurological Disorders, Study Finds

Jun 1, 2018

“Over the past 20 years, there have been pain researchers observing a pattern for pain, or tinnitus researchers doing the same for tinnitus, but no one combined the different disorders to say, What’s the difference between these diseases in terms of brainwaves, and what do they have in common?” — Dr. Sven Vanneste, associate professor at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences. READ MORE


Eurek Alert

NIST Study Shows Face Recognition Experts Perform Better with AI as Partner

May 28, 2018

“Societies rely on the expertise and training of professional forensic facial examiners, because their judgments are thought to be best; however, we learned that to get the most highly accurate face identification, we should combine the strengths of humans and machines.” — Dr. Alice O’Toole, Aage and Margareta Moller Professor and professor of neuroscience. READ MORE


The Western Journal

Four Things Everyone Can Do to Help Prevent Alzheimer’s Disease

May 26, 2018

“It’s almost like there’s a janitor inside that cleans up some of the toxic by-products that may be a precursor to amyloid.” — Dr. Sandra Bond Chapman, Dee Wyly Distinguished University Chair and professor and founder and chief director at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences’ Center for BrainHealth. READ MORE


Psychology Today

Vagus Nerve Stimulation Enhances Brain Plasticity

May 16, 2018

“Our experiment was designed to ask this new question: After a stroke, do you have to rehabilitate every single action? If VNS helps you, is it only helping with the exact motion or function you paired with stimulation?” — Dr. Michael Kilgard, Margaret Fonde Jonsson Chair and professor of neuroscience. READ MORE


Eurek Alert

Study Suggests Relationship Between Socioeconomic Status and Adult Brain

May 14, 2018

“We know that socioeconomic status influences the structure of the brain in childhood and older age, but there’s been a gap in the research. We wanted to see if there were relationships between SES and the brain across a wider range of adulthood.” — Dr. Gagan Wig, assistant professor at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences. READ MORE


Pulse News

Interactive Robot Emerges as Answer to Prayers for Korean Parents of ASD Kids

May 10, 2018

“Many children with ASD respond better to robots than to humans. They are “more engaged” in communication when their therapist is a robot.” — Dr. Pamela Rollins, associate professor at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences’ Callier Center for Communication Disorders. READ MORE


KERA News

The Way Chronic Pain Begins Could Be Different For Men And Women, Study Says

May 2, 2018

“In men, certain pathways are engaged that cause the pain to persist. If you still have pain three months after, by most current definitions that would be chronic pain. And [those pathways] seem to be much different in women.” — Dr. Theodore Price, associate professor of neuroscience at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences. READ MORE


The Atlantic

How Exactly Does Autism Muddy Communication?

Apr 19, 2018

“We want autistic individuals to have better, more fulfilling social experiences, employment prospects, and quality of life, and there may be a limit to how far we can get simply by trying to train autistic people to have more neurotypical social skills or expressions.” — Dr. Noah Sasson, assistant professor at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences. READ MORE


Park Cities People

Are You Getting Enough Sleep?

Apr 17, 2018

Too little sleep has been tied to increased risks of a number of health conditions, such as obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, and stroke. It also can exacerbate mental distress. From a recent lecture at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences’ Center for BrainHealth. READ MORE


Cision

BrainHealth Team Secures Founding Director of DoD Research Agency Dr. Geoffrey Ling to Lead Initiative to Double Human Brain Performance in 10 Years

Apr 4, 2018

“Traditional brain health is centered on pharmaceutical research. Our new initiative will provide a multidisciplinary approach for building brain and cognitive capacity through activities based on scientific research. Dr. Ling’s extensive expertise will be invaluable as we move forward.” — Dr. Sandra Bond Chapman, Dee Wyly Distinguished University Chair and professor and founder and chief director at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences’ Center for BrainHealth. READ MORE


Eurek Alert

Social Awareness Increases Prove Brain Changing in Adults with Autism

Mar 28, 2018

“A major contribution of our study is the results challenge the outdated view that social cognition issues are difficult to remediate after childhood.” — Dr. Sandra Bond Chapman, Dee Wyly Distinguished University Chair and professor and founder and chief director at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences’ Center for BrainHealth. READ MORE


MD Magazine

Vagus Nerve Stimulation Assists in Stroke Recovery

Mar 28, 2018

“Our experiment was designed to ask this new question: After a stroke, do you have to rehabilitate every single action?” — Dr. Michael Kilgard, Margaret Fonde Jonsson Chair and professor of neuroscience. READ MORE


Preston Hollow People

UTD Researcher Lends Name to Pain Cream

Mar 7, 2018

“You have to be able to detect pain and protect yourself. Likewise, opioids also play an important role, especially with post-surgical pain. Not treating post-surgical pain could lead to chronic pain.” — Dr. Theodore Price, associate professor of neuroscience at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences. READ MORE


The Daily Mail

Why Female Pain is Such a Mystery: Scientists Discover Women’s Cells Have a Completely Different Reaction to Men’s — But Almost Every Study to Date has Only Used Male Models

March 5, 2018

“It leads me to believe that it’s fairly likely we’ll want to make male- and female-specific drugs for chronic pain.” — Dr. Theodore Price, associate professor of neuroscience at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences. READ MORE


The Dallas Morning News

More Than Crunches: 7 Tips to Keep Your Brain as Sharp as Your Body

March 5, 2018

“Science discoveries over the last two decades reveal that our brain is the most modifiable part of our body and easiest to strengthen, more than our heart or teeth.” — Dr. Sandra Bond Chapman, Dee Wyly Distinguished University Chair and professor and founder and chief director at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences’ Center for BrainHealth. READ MORE


NBCDFW.com

Program Takes Seniors Into Virtual Reality, Improves Brain Function

Feb 28, 2018

“The more that you can help people to engage in the memories that were very meaningful to them in a certain time of their life, it actually triggers this kind of happiness and remembering that calms their mood and lets them see empowerment.” — Dr. Sandra Bond Chapman, Dee Wyly Distinguished University Chair and professor and founder and chief director at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences’ Center for BrainHealth. READ MORE


The British Psychological Society

Wisdom is Cause and Effect in Action!

Feb 27, 2018

“The relationship between cause and effect may not always be obvious. However, reasoning through cause and effect provides a way to cope with feelings of powerlessness. By examining similar situations from the past where we have succeeded, we can become better informed about what will happen in the current situation.” — Dr. Daniel Krawczyk, Debbie and Jim Francis Chair and associate professor of cognitive neuroscience and cognitive psychology at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences’ Center for BrainHealth. READ MORE


The Sun

Kids More Likely to Choose Chocolate When Sad and Savoury Snacks When Happy

Feb 23, 2018

“The kids watching the saddest video ate the most chocolate. There was a significant drop in consumption among the ones watching the happy video, but they still consumed more chocolate than the neutral video group.” — Dr. Shayla Holub, associate professor and program head, Psychological Sciences, Psychology and Child Learning and Development. READ MORE


WGN Radio

Dr. Katz on “Foreign” Medical Conditions

Feb 18, 2018

Karen Conti speaks with Dr. William Katz, as he provides information on Dyslexia, Dysphasia, and details on the phenomenon of Foreign Accent Syndrome. — Dr. William Katz, professor of speech science and neurolinguistics. READ MORE


ArkLaTexHomepage.com

Meet Milo, A Robot Helping Texas Students With Autism

Feb 7, 2018

Creators of Milo say students respond to Milo because of the robot’s facial expressions. Research from the Callier Center for Communication Disorders shows individuals with autism start talking to the robots when they don’t talk to other people. READ MORE


KERA News

To Boost Your Brain Health, Use The Acronym ‘FIRST,’ UT Dallas Expert Says

Feb 6, 2018

“A person’s average peak brain years are between age 35 and 40, but the average lifespan is double that. We’re living half of our life with a healthy brain in a state of decline.” — Dr. Sandra Bond Chapman, Dee Wyly Distinguished University Chair and professor and founder and chief director at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences’ Center for BrainHealth. READ MORE


KERA News

Exploring Ways To Treat Pain Without Addiction As U.S. Opioid Crisis Worsens

Feb 2, 2018

“There’s no question that opioids are effective for acute pain, but the issue that we have right now is that the drugs that we have to treat chronic pain don’t work very well and the drugs that are efficacious are incredibly dangerous.” — Dr. Theodore Price, associate professor of neuroscience at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences. READ MORE


NBCDFW.com

Special Goggles Help Diagnose Possible Brain Injuries

Feb 2, 2018

“The brain is a dynamic machine that changes after injuries so you may not see the symptoms of a concussion for minutes, hours or days after the event.” — Dr. Robert Rennaker, Texas Instruments Distinguished Chair in Bioengineering, professor of electrical engineering and professor of neuroscience. READ MORE


Texas Monthly

15 Innovators Reshaping Texas

Feb 2018

“When I say I do brain health, most people don’t even know what that means. People either think, “I’m fine,” or “I’ve got Alzheimer’s disease, and there’s nothing I can do.” — Dr. Sandra Bond Chapman, Dee Wyly Distinguished University Chair and professor and founder and chief director at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences’ Center for BrainHealth. READ MORE


KERA | Think

Imagining A Future Without Opioids

Jan 31, 2018

Since 2000, more than 300,000 Americans have died after overdosing on opioids, according to the CDC. A podcast about arguably America’s most important public health crisis — and about the prospects for non-opioid pain medication. — Dr. Theodore Price, associate professor of neuroscience at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences. READ MORE


Laboratory Equipment

Cognitive Training Helps Regain a Younger-working Brain

Jan 23, 2018

“It is thrilling for me as a cognitive neuroscientist, who has previously studied age-related cognitive decline, to find that cognitive training has the potential to strengthen the aging brain to function more like a younger brain.” — Michael Motes, senior research scientist at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences’ Center for BrainHealth. READ MORE


UT Dallas Research Blog

Superheroes Among Us: Dr. Michael Burton Battles Pain

Jan 23, 2018

“The research gets interesting where that adaptive response becomes maladaptive. Adaptive is a natural response from the body — to survive and adapt to our surroundings. Maladaptive is a little different.” — Dr. Michael Burton, assistant professor at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences. READ MORE


Dallas Innovates

A Look At Dallas’ Rise As a Neurostimulation Hub

Jan 22, 2018

DFW hasn’t historically been a medical device or life sciences hub, but in the last 10 years the tide has turned. It has emerged as a center for innovation in bioelectronics devices, sprouting a significant number of companies and research centers specializing in neurostimulation. READ MORE


People Behind the Science Podcast

Dr. Ted Price: Clarifying the Causes of Chronic Pain and Creating New Treatments

Jan 22, 2018

Some of his trainees have gone on to do academic research, have become professors, or have accepted positions in industry where they are working to get new medicines into the clinic. — Dr. Theodore Price, associate professor of neuroscience at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences. READ MORE


People Behind the Science Podcast

Dr. Greg Dussor: Channeling Research Efforts to Understand Mechanisms and Potential Therapeutic Targets of Migraine Pain

Jan 8, 2018

“Scientific research is challenging, and to be successful, you really have to enjoy it. Careers in research are really fun because there are moments where you are the first person on Earth to know the answer to something. This makes it worth all of the struggles.” — Dr. Greg Dussor, associate professor at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences. READ MORE

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