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180-GHz and 300-GHz Transceivers for Dielectric Waveguide Communications by Dr. Kenneth O (UTD)
Friday, Mar. 22
1 p.m. - 2 p.m. Location: ECSS 3.503

Abstract

 A collaborative effort is underway to demonstrate high data rate communication over a 1-m long dielectric waveguide by implementing four communication channels using vertically and horizontally polarized waves (Polarization Division Multiplexing (PDM)) and two 45-GHz bands around 180 and 300 GHz (Frequency Division Multiplexing (FDM)). The target data rate is 120 Gbps. This demonstration will utilize 180-GHz and 300-GHz minimum shift keying (MSK) transmitters and receivers connected to a cross dipole for exciting and picking up signals at two different frequency bands with two different polarization. The cross dipoles are being co-designed with the transitions to and from a holey type waveguide formed using quartz tubes by Prof. R. Henderson and her students. The waveguide was developed by Prof. D. MacFarlane and his students. This presentation will overview this collaborative effort, and more specifically will describe the current status of development of the individual 180-GHz and 300-GHz transmitters and receivers, as well as the on-going effort to complete the transceivers that can support the PDM and FDM demonstration.

Bio

Kenneth O received his S.B, S.M, and Ph.D degrees in Electrical Engineering and Computer Sci­ence from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA in 1984, 1984, and 1989, respectively. From 1989 to 1994, Dr. O worked at Analog Devices Inc. developing sub-micron CMOS processes for mixed signal applications, and high speed bipolar and BiCMOS processes. He has been a professor at the University of Florida, Gainesville from 1994 to 2009.  He is currently the Director of Texas Analog Center of Excellence and TI Distinguished University Chair Professor of Analog Circuits and Systems at the University of Texas at Dallas. His research group is developing circuits and components required to implement analog and digital systems operating at frequencies up to 40THz using silicon IC technologies. He has authored and co-authored ~260 journal and conference publications, as well as holding 12 patents. He has also been serving as the Vice President of IEEE Solid-State Circuits Society since 2018. Dr. O has received the 2014 Semiconductor Research Association University Researcher Award. Prof. O is also an IEEE Fellow.

Contact Info:
Donna Kuchinski, 972-883-5556
Questions? Email me.

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