Interpersonal Communication in a Diverse World

Abstract

Interpersonal communication is the foundation of all human interactions. This is true of all levels and types of relationships. On a college campus, in the workplace, within families or just trying to function in the world, interpersonal communication is how we reach out or send signals of our willingness to interact. There are several important points regarding our interactions with others that affect our interactions, especially in the diverse community of today. Verbal communication, non-verbal communication, perception, interpersonal climate, listening, noise and our concept of "self" all relate to how we connect (or don't!) with others. Culture, religion, individual "fields of experience," gender and many other physical, social and societal factors also play a role in our interactions with others, our perceptions of others (accurate or inaccurate) and how we relate with all types of people. Our interpersonal communications affect all things: our relationships with teachers, students, peers, family members, coworkers, and all other groups and individuals we encounter in our daily lives. Are you aware of the signals you are sending, the messages you are broadcasting (purposefully or not!) and the ways people experience you? This lecture hopes to provide some insight and strategies to improve interpersonal communications in all regards across a diverse community population.

Dr. Lynn Winstead Mabe

Dr. Lynn Winstead Mabe

Dr. Lynn Winstead-Mabe is a Senior Lecturer at The University of Texas at Dallas in the school of Interdisciplinary Studies where she teaches both graduate and undergraduate classes in the area of communication skills, including crisis, interpersonal, professional communication areas. She enjoys working with her students to improve these skills. Dr. Winstead-Mabe received her Doctorate from Texas A&M University in 2001, and received the Distinguished Dissertation Award for her doctoral research on communication issues in law enforcement relationships. Prior to receiving her doctoral, she was a Licensed Professional Counselor in private practice working with law enforcement officers and their families in the Dallas-Fort Worth area for over 20 years, including the Dallas Police Department. In addition to teaching, she is a consultant for several different law enforcement agencies and departments where she works on departmental and agency issues regarding interpersonal communication, crisis communication, Critical Incident Stress Debriefing (CISD) and crisis management. She specializes in dealing with the specific and unique issues that can be a product of a career in law enforcement and the communication issues that arise, in both the personal and professional lives of police officers. She is an adjunct faculty member at the Institute for Law Enforcement Administration in Plano, Texas, and does consulting and trainings for law enforcement agencies, as well as communication and crisis response trainings across the country.