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August 26, 2016

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In Print & On Air includes general interest media coverage of UT Dallas students, faculty, staff and leadership and their achievements. To receive In The News, an occasional email bulletin featuring selected media coverage of UT Dallas, subscribe online.

The Dallas Morning News

Clinton, Trump Use Twitter to Instantly Connect Voters with Campaigns

Aug. 23, 2016

"The internet will never elect a president. It will always come down to the fundamental questions: What does a candidate believe in, and what are the issues that you care about?" — Dr. Janet Johnson, clinical assistant professor read more


The Dallas Morning News

Olympic Athletes Say Cupping Therapy Works, But Science Disagrees

Aug. 15, 2016

"There's evidence that cupping has been used in the West since at least the 1800s. Now it's experiencing an Olympic moment, but there's no scientific proof that it works." — Dr. Seema Yasmin, professor in practice read more


NBC DFW

Crooks Use New Technology to Steal Credit Card Information at The Pump

Aug. 5, 2016

"Whenever you have a micro-processor, there is a potential for vulnerability because there is both hardware and software on it. There is some malicious code they could have exploited." — Dr. Bhavani Thuraisingham, Louis A. Beecherl Jr. Distinguished Professor read more


FOX 4

FOX 4Ward: Self-Driving Cars

Aug. 5, 2016

“By reducing the number of sensors we can bring down cost and complexity of these systems.” — Dr. Nicholas Gans, assistant professor of electrical engineering read more


The Dallas Morning News

Second Look at Second Quarter Shows DFW Venture Capital Report Was $64M Off

Aug. 3, 2016

"Our culture here in Dallas and probably throughout the state of Texas is a bootstrap culture. And pure venture capital reports are going to miss that." — Jeremy Vickers, executive director of the Institute for Innovation and Entrepreneurship read more


Fast Company

Is Multitasking Bad For You Or Not?

Aug. 3, 2016

"Your brain is built to be a single-channel action system with limited capacity. It bottlenecks when trying to perform more than one mental task at a time, particularly those that require mental effort." — Dr. Sandra Bond Chapman, founder and chief director of the Center for BrainHealth and Dee Wyly Distinguished University Chair read more


The Dallas Morning News

North Texas Parents Use Geek Culture to Share Lessons and Bond with Their Kids

Aug. 2, 2016

"I wanted my daughter to be exposed to science. But I also wanted the other students in the school to be able to learn too. It’s one thing to read it in a book, and then it’s a very different thing to experience it." — Dr. Mary Urquhart, associate professor and head of the Department of Science and Mathematics Education read more


The Dallas Morning News

Alex R. Piquero: How Childhood Hunger Leads to Adult Violence

Aug. 2, 2016

"We might prevent violent crime in the future by feeding children today." — Dr. Alex R. Piquero, Ashbel Smith Professor of Criminology read more


The Dallas Morning News

DFWs Hottest Home Markets in 2016 Are Modest-Price Spots

July 28, 2016

"I see this sustaining for some time. A lot of it has to do with all the corporate relocations we are seeing." — Dr. Randall S. Guttery, real estate programs director read more


NBCDFW

Summer Camp in Collin County for Kids with Cochlear Implants

July 28, 2016

"Music in our culture is really important and other kids, they love music. They like to be able to go to concerts, sing along with their friends." — Melissa Sweeney, head of speech-language pathology read more


CNN

Police Acts of Violence Unbiased, Controversial New Data Say

July 27, 2016

"What we should do at the federal level is to get people to put into and populate a database where we can get this information. ... That, to me, is the moral of the story." — Dr. Alex R. Piquero, Ashbel Smith Professor of Criminology read more


The Dallas Morning News

Though Rattled by Dallas Ambush, Most Police Departments Aren't Changing Policies

July 21, 2016

"There's a heightened awareness across the country in law enforcement that there is this huge, deep divide in our country, and that police officers are at risk because of that." — Dr. Robert Taylor, professor of criminology and public affairs read more


WPR Radio

Can Keeping Busy Help the Brain?

July 19, 2016

"Busyness enhances neural circuitry and improves cognition." — Dr. Denise C. Park, director of research at Center for Vital Longevity at UT Dallas read more


Newsweek

Police Departments Issuing Safety Precautions after Baton Rouge, Dallas

July 18, 2016

"One-person cars are just as safe as two-person cars. It's better to have more one-person cars out on the street than fewer two-people cars." — Dr. Robert Taylor, professor of criminology and public affairs read more


The Dallas Morning News

Texas Teachers Learn Coding at UT Dallas, Hoping to Bring Lessons to Their Classrooms

July 14, 2016

"The key thing is just the exposure. ... At least we feel better that, by the time they go to high school and college, they did try and they can seriously decide if that is something they want to pursue." — Dr. Jey Veerasamy, senior lecturer of computer science and director of the Center for Computer Science Education & Outreach read more


Dallas Innovates

UT Dallas Francesca Filbey Looks for Answers on Effects, Dependence in Her Study

July 14, 2016

“We found that this disruption of the reward system correlates with the number of problems, such as family issues, individuals have because of their marijuana use.” — Dr. Francesca Filbey, director of cognitive neuroscience of addictive behaviors at the Center for BrainHealth read more


Fortune

Here's How the UK Can Expect Theresa to Lead

July 14, 2016

"What may have secured her position as prime minister, however, was her statement following Brexit that, even though she supported staying, she would work diligently to negotiate Britain’s withdrawal from the EU." — Dr. Euel Elliott, professor of public policy and political economy read more


U.S. News and World Report

Will 'Too Big to Fail' Ever Go Away? It Hasn't Yet

July 12, 2016

“It would require an enormous political effort on the part of the Fed and the Justice Department. Witness how difficult it was to break up the Bell Telephone system in the 1970s, and multiply that by five." — Dr. Malcolm Wardlaw, assistant professor of finance and managerial economics read more


KCET

Revisiting Dorothea Lange's 'Migrant Mother': The Great Depression's Most Famous Photo

July 11, 2016

"It's a story of hope ... a story of immigrants that moved to this part of the world and were helped by the people of Nipomo, (which is) something certainly to be proud of.” — Dr. Paul Lester, clinical professor in the School of Arts, Technology, and Emerging Communication read more


KERA

New Study Links Childhood Hunger To Violent Behavior

July 6, 2016

"I think that all of us have an active stake in making sure that our population, our neighbors, our kids, our families have at least adequate nourishment in their bodies." — Dr. Alex R. Piquero, Ashbel Smith Professor of Criminology read more


MIT Technology Review

Are Face Recognition Systems Accurate? Depends on Your Race

July 6, 2016

"If your training set is strongly biased toward a particular race, your algorithm will do better recognizing that race." — Dr. Alice O'Toole, Aage and Margareta Møller Professor read more


Dallas Innovates

UTD's Venture Development Center to Launch Incubator Program

July 6, 2016

"We don't just want to have students that will go work for somebody, we want students who are going to go hire somebody." — Olia Bosovik BS’12 MBA’15, assistant director of the Venture Development Center read more


FOX 4

FOX 4Ward: Safer Alternatives to Pain Meds

July 5, 2016

"We would like to avoid the problems that can happen when you bind receptors in respiratory centers or reward circuitry that can cause addiction by targeting pain in the peripheral nervous system." — Dr. Ted Price, associate professor in the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences read more


CNN

To Improve Your Memory, Get Moving ... or Take a Nap

June 29, 2016

“Aerobic exercise in particular appears to increase levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, a protein that supports memory and is also linked to neurogenesis, the birth of new brain cells.” — Dr. Sandra Bond Chapman, founder and chief director of the Center for BrainHealth and Dee Wyly Distinguished University Chair read more


NBC DFW

UT Dallas Computer Science Students Get New Internship Opportunity with State Farm

June 23, 2016

“This is a first here at UT Dallas. We are excited about this and we would like to replicate this program with other companies.” — Pete Poorman, director of corporate relations read more


KERA

Texas Economist Says Don't Mess With 'Brexit'

June 22, 2016

“International instability in Europe is not a good thing, as we’ve learned painfully over the past several decades, and so Texans have reason to be concerned about this.” — Dr. Harold Clarke, Ashbel Smith Professor in the School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences read more


CW 33

Brexit 101: What You Need to Know About the British EU Referendum

June 20, 2016

“The pitch has been almost exclusively that it’s good for Britain economically to be a member of the European Union.” — Dr. Harold Clarke, Ashbel Smith Professor of Political Science read more


The Dallas Morning News

Richardson Physics Professor Hoping to Create the Google Maps of Air Pollution

June 16, 2016

“Instead of the quickest route, you could imagine the least-polluted route or lowest-pollen route. That could make a big difference.” — Dr. David Lary, associate professor of physics read more


Fortune

A Brexit Is Looking More and More Likely

June 16, 2016

“Given the nature of this campaign, however, the challenge for pollsters will be to determine who is most likely to show up to vote.” — Dr. Euel Elliott, professor of public policy and political economy and associate dean in the School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences read more


Texas Public Radio

The Source: Gun Violence in Spotlight After Orlando

June 16, 2016

“To have good policy, you need to have evidence, and to have that evidence, you need to have data.” — Dr. Seema Yasmin, professor in practice read more


Healthline

How Virtual Reality Is Gaining Traction in Health Care

June 15, 2016

“Medical VR training can ensure that healthcare professionals are aware of proper procedures and protocols, can allow them to practice those procedures without harming others, and can inform those workers what the consequences of bad practices could be.” — Dr. Ryan McMahan, assistant professor of computer science read more


The Dallas Morning News

Why Is Shaming & Blaming So Easy Online? And Whatll It Take for Us to Act Like Grownups Again?

June 14, 2016

“People aren’t listening and creating dialogue. They’re reacting and attacking and posting the first thought that comes to mind, with no consequences.” — Dr. Janet Johnson, clinical assistant professor in ATEC read more


Fort Worth Star-Telegram

Texas Can Solve the Problem of Chronic Pain

June 13, 2016

"With so many Americans suffering from chronic pain, and with such a strong research base in Texas, the time is right for statewide initiatives toward developing new therapies for the treatment of chronic pain." — Dr. Ted Price, associate professor in the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences read more


CBS DFW

Are You Addicted To Facebook?

June 13, 2016

“My biggest fear about social media is about what it is replacing — conversations, thinking, problem-solving, daydreaming, outdoor activity and in-person interactions.” — Dr. Marion Underwood, Dean of Graduate Studies, Associate Provost and Ashbel Smith Professor read more


Fox 4

FOX 4Ward: Planet Life

June 13, 2016

"We're looking for a planet that’s like the Earth, so it has a really vigorous biosphere, life everywhere you look on the planet." — Dr. Mary Urquhart, associate professor and head of the Department of Science and Mathematics Education read more


Fast Company

Surprisingly Simple Ways You Can Trick Your Brain Into Focusing

June 9, 2016

"It's paradoxical that some of the things we think are good for our brain, the brain science is showing are almost like tobacco for the brain." — Dr. Sandra Bond Chapman, founder and chief director of the Center for BrainHealth and Dee Wyly Distinguished University Chair read more


Business Insider

Scientists Found Something Strange When They Looked at the Brains of Stoners

June 8, 2016

"We found that marijuana disrupts the brain's natural reward circuitry, making marijuana highly salient to heavy users." — Dr. Francesca Filbey, director of Cognitive Neuroscience Research in Addictive Disorders at the Center for BrainHealth read more


DFW Child

Daddy's Home: The Rewards and Stigmas of Paternity Leave

June 2, 2016

"In the long run, employees who are offered some sort of paid paternal leave stay longer, are more committed and companies don't have to pay to retrain someone new." — Dr. Sheryl Skaggs, sociology professor read more


art and seek

The Big Screen: Studio Ghibli

June 2, 2016

"He captures the audience's imagination wonderfully. He has incredibly strong female characters. … Visually he has incredible images of flight in almost every film." — Dr. Marc Hairston, research scientist at the Center for Space Sciences read more


The Dallas Morning News

Only Threat Posed by Gunman In Dallas Family Dollar Robbery Was a Stained Shirt

May 29, 2016

"It's like when you’re driving on the highway at 70 miles per hour. You're trying to operate the car and make the best guess as to what the cars around you are going to do without all the necessary info.” — Dr. Alex R. Piquero, Ashbel Smith Professor of Criminology read more


The Dallas Morning News

Two Dallas-Area Students End Up on List of ISIS Fighters, and Local Muslims Brace For the Fallout Yet Again

May 27, 2016

“We are at no greater risk than any other metropolitan area — no more than Chicago, Houston or any other city with a significant Muslim presence.” — Dr. Robert Taylor, professor of criminology and public affairs read more


KERA FM

Using Science To Protect Antiquities: The Next Frontier Of Art Conservation

May 18, 2016

"We're fascinated by the fact that the colors in these textiles can persist with extreme brightness for hundreds and hundreds of years.” — Dr. David McPhail, Distinguished Chair of Conservation Science read more


HealthDay

Keep Busy! Stay Sharp!

May 17, 2016

"We think it is likely that being busy is good for your cognition." — Dr. Sara Festini, research associate at the Center for Vital Longevity read more


FOX 4

Meghan Trainor Pulls Video Because of Photoshopped Waist

May 11, 2016

"A parent honestly needs to role model really healthy behaviors — eat a balanced diet, say no to bad diets." — Sara Asberry, registered dietitian in the Student Wellness Center read more


Gizmag logo

Bipedal Robot Conquers Uneven Ground

May 8, 2016

"The ability of MARLO to gracefully navigate uneven terrains is very exciting for my work in prosthetics." — Dr. Robert Gregg, assistant professor of mechanical engineering and bioengineering read more


KERA-FM

The Race for the White House

May 5, 2016

"Trump's success and Sanders’ as well reflect this deep disaffection with the political and economic establishment in this country." — Dr. Harold Clarke, Ashbel Smith Professor of Political Science read more


WFOR-TV

Matchmaking for Pet Lovers Gaining in Popularity

May 3, 2016

“Instead of having this huge mass of people to look at, where you don’t know where to begin. The niche websites allow you to narrow down your search to people who share a very important value.” — Dr. Karen Prager, professor of psychology read more


KARK TV

Education Matters: Coding Club

May 2, 2016

"They're not afraid to try. They're not afraid to fail.” — Dr. Jey Veerasamy, senior lecturer in computer science and director of computer science outreach. read more


ABC Radio National

Costa Rica: The Happiest Country on Earth

April 18, 2016

“Economically I think Costa Rica has made necessary adjustments, particularly after the economic crisis it endured of the 1980s.” — Dr. Monica Rankin read more


The Washington Post

With Police Shootings in National Spotlight, a Fairfax Officer Goes on Trial for Murder

April 15, 2016

“The vast majority of police shootings are justified because the suspect was armed or threatened the life of the officer doing the shooting. As much as the criminal cases capture headlines, they are exceptionally rare.” — Dr. John Worrall, criminology professor read more


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