The Office of Graduate Studies

Graduate Writing Services

Improve Your Writing

Graduate students may make appointments for feedback on their writing projects, such as a course assignment, a personal statement, part of a dissertation. Our one-to-one consultations help identify areas for improvement and assist with the overall writing process. Because our purpose is to help graduate students improve their skills, our services do not include editing or proofreading. We can help you, however, learn strategies for proofreading and editing your own work.

Schedule An Appointment

Graduate students enrolled in the School of Management should contact the Business Communication Center to schedule all writing appointments.

All other graduate students may make two 50-minute appointments per week but schedule only one appointment per day.

To schedule an appointment for a consultation or for more information, please email Thomasina Hickmann [email protected]

Graduate Writing Services does not provide consultations for resumes and cover letters. For assistance, graduate students should contact the Career Center.

Graduate Writing Services Workshops - Fall 2018

September

Download the Fall 2018 Graduate Writing Services Brochure!

  • Writing with Style, Part 1
    Thursday, September 6, from 2:30 to 4:00 pm, FA 2.206

    This two-part series covers fundamental principles of academic writing. It is designed to help graduate students improve their writing by reviewing and applying a range of strategies based on concepts of effective communication.

  • Please note that the purpose of this series is not to address grammar issues but to discuss strategies for improving prose style.

    Part 1 focuses on clear and concise communication, paying particular attention to the reader’s perspective as we discuss how to write with clarity, brevity, and coherence.

    Registration is not required. Seating will be available on a first-come, first-served basis. Light refreshments will be provided.

    Other events in this series: Writing with Style, Part 2, which is presented on Thursday, September 13, from 2:30 to 4:00 p.m. and later in the semester on Friday, October 19, from 10:00 to 11:30 a.m. in FA 2.206.

    Students are welcome to attend either or both parts of this workshop.

  • Writing with Style, Part 2
    Thursday, September 13, from 2:30 to 4:30 pm, FA 2.206

    This two-part series covers fundamental principles of academic writing. It is designed to help graduate students improve their writing by reviewing and applying a range of strategies based on concepts of effective communication.

    Please note that the purpose of this series is not to address grammar issues but to discuss strategies for improving prose style.

    Part 2 addresses the principles of reader expectation theory and how to incorporate them into your writing by considering the organization of the entire document. No matter what type of writing you are doing, reader expectation theory can help you improve it. Light refreshments will be provided.

    Registration is not required. Seating will be available on a first-come, first-served basis.

    Other events in this series: Writing with Style, Part 1, which is presented on Thursday, September 6, from 2:30 to 4:00 p.m. and later in the semester on Friday, October 12, from 10:00 to 11:30 a.m. in FA 2.206.

    Students are welcome to attend either or both parts of this workshop.

  • Writing the Thesis and Dissertation Proposals
    Time and Location: Friday, September 14, from 9:00 am to noon. Location TBD.

    This is the first workshop of a 2-part series sponsored by the Office of Graduate Studies and the McDermott Library to support graduate students who are currently working on or about to begin their thesis or dissertation proposals.

    Presented by the Office of Graduate Studies, Part 1 covers the elements that are common to proposals across various disciplines, the ingredients that make them effective, and some rhetorical strategies and style principles that can contribute to their success. Breakfast will be provided by the Office of Graduate Studies.

    Registration is required and will open at 10:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 29.

    Click to register for Part 1.

    Other events in this series: Part 2, Library Resources for Researching Thesis and Dissertation Topics, on Friday, September 21, from 9:00 a.m. to noon in McDermott Library, MC 2.524.

    A separate registration is required to attend Part 2 of this workshop. For further information and to register for the second part, please visit the Library Events page: https://www.utdallas.edu/library/about-the-library/events/

    Students are welcome to attend either or both parts of this series.

  • Preparing a Manuscript for Publication in the STEM Fields
    Time and Location: Tuesday, September 18, from 10:00 am to 11:00am, FA 2.206.

    This workshop will focus on best practices for preparing a journal article and strategies for getting it published.

    It will cover material geared toward graduate students and postdoctoral scholars carrying out research in the STEM fields and be presented by Dr. Julia Chan, Professor of Chemistry at UT Dallas and an Associate Editor of the journal ScienceAdvances.

    Light refreshments will be provided.

    Registration is required and will open at 10:00 a.m. on September 4. Click to register.

  • Managing Materials
    Time and Location: Thursday, September 20 from 2:30pm to 4:00pm, FA 2.206.

    In this workshop, we’ll discuss strategies for organizing your time effectively, focusing especially on techniques for establishing and implementing a productive writing routine.

    We’ll primarily address how to cope with completing a long-term writing project but also consider how these strategies can be used for juggling smaller, multiple projects.

    Light refreshments will be provided.

    Registration is not required. Seating will be available on a first-come, first-served basis.

  • Library Resources for Researching Thesis and Dissertation Topics
    Time and Location: Friday, September 21 from 9:00am to noon, MC 2.524.

    This is the second workshop of a 2-part series sponsored by the Office of Graduate Studies and the McDermott Library to support graduate students who are currently working on or about to begin their thesis or dissertation proposals.

    In Part 2, McDermott Library will lead a hands-on session focused on using library resources, government documents, and other source materials to uncover existing research that supports a thesis or dissertation topic.

    Registration is required. For more information and to register for Part 2, please visit the Library Events page: https://www.utdallas.edu/library/about-the-library/events/

    Other events in this series: Part 1, Writing the Thesis and Dissertation Proposals, which is presented on Friday, September 14, from 9:00 a.m. to noon. A separate registration is required to attend Part 1 of this workshop. To register for the first part, go to https://utdallas.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_cuQdmoByskKepGR

    Students are welcome to attend either or both parts of this series.

October

  • Writing the Literature Review, Part 1
    Thursday, October 11, from 2:30 to 4:00 pm, FA 2.206

    This two-part workshop focuses on writing about research within the context of the literature review.
  • In Part 1, we will discuss the purpose of the literature review, methods for establishing its scope, and best practices for managing and organizing your research sources.

    Light refreshments will be provided.

    Registration is not required.

    Other events in this series: Writing the Literature Review, Part 2 will take place on Thursday, October 25, from 2:30 to 4:00 p.m. in FA 2.206.

    Students are welcome to attend either or both parts of this workshop.

  • Writing with Style, Part 1
    Friday, October 12, from 10:00 to 11:30am, FA 2.206

    This two-part workshop covers fundamental principles of academic writing. It is designed to help graduate students improve their writing by reviewing and applying a range of strategies based on concepts of effective communication.

    Please note that the purpose of this series is not to address grammar issues but to discuss strategies for improving prose style.

    Part 1 focuses on clear and concise communication, paying particular attention to the reader’s perspective as we discuss how to write with clarity, brevity, and coherence.

    Light refreshments will be provided.

    Registration is not required. Seating will be available on a first-come, first-served basis.

    Other events in this series: Writing with Style, Part 2, which is presented on Thursday, September 13, from 2:30 to 4:00 p.m. and later in the semester on Friday, October 19, from 10:00 to 11:30 a.m. in FA 2.206.

    Students are welcome to attend either or both parts of this workshop.

  • Defending the Dissertation Proposal in Behavioral and Brain Sciences
    Wednesday, October 17, from 12:00 to 1:00pm, FA 2.206

    This two-part series covers fundamental principles of academic writing. It is designed to help graduate students improve their writing by reviewing and applying a range of strategies based on concepts of effective communication.

    The panel will be made up of BBS doctoral students who will address both academic and practical issues in sharing their own experience of how to prepare and give a successful defense.

    A light lunch will be provided.

    Registration is required and will open at 10:00 a.m. on Wednesday, September 26. To register, go to https://utdallas.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_bpx1jCDlEP0gzqZ

  • Writing with Style, Part 2
    Friday, October 19, from 10:00 to 11:30am, FA 2.206

    In this workshop, we’ll discuss strategies for organizing your time effectively, focusing especially on how to establish and implement a productive writing routine. We’ll primarily address issues associated with completing a long-term writing project, but these may also apply to juggling smaller, multiple projects.

    Please note that the purpose of this series is not to address grammar issues but to discuss strategies for improving prose style.

    Part 2 addresses the principles of reader expectation theory and how to incorporate them into your writing by considering the organization of the entire document. No matter what type of writing you are doing, reader expectation theory can help you improve it.

    Light refreshments will be provided.

    Registration is not required. Seating will be available on a first-come, first-served basis.

    Other events in this series: Writing with Style, Part 1, which is presented on Thursday, September 6, from 2:30 to 4:00 p.m. and later in the semester on Friday, October 12, from 10:00 to 11:30 a.m. in FA 2.206.

    Students are welcome to attend either or both parts of this workshop.

  • Writing the Literature Review, Part 2
    Thursday, October 25, from 2:30 to 4:00 pm, FA 2.206

    This two-part workshop focuses on writing about research within the context of the literature review.

    In Part 2, we will discuss strategies for organizing your review according to a logical pattern, demonstrating your knowledge of the scholarly conversation, and creating a coherent, persuasive narrative that fulfills your objectives. Light refreshments will be provided.

    Registration is not required.

    Other events in this series: Writing the Literature Review, Part 1 takes place on Thursday, October 11, from 2:30 to 4:00 p.m. in FA 2.206.

    Students are welcome to attend either or both parts of this workshop.

  • Creating Titles and Abstracts
    Wednesday, October 31, from 2:30 to 4:00 pm, FA 2.206

    This two-part workshop focuses on writing about research within the context of the literature review.

    This workshop focuses on how an effective title and abstract can attract, inform, and impress your targeted readership. Join us to learn more about the key role that they play in getting your article published and your conference paper accepted.

    Light refreshments will be provided.

    Registration is not required.

November

  • Publishing Your First Journal Article in the Social Sciences
    Wednesday, November 7, from 2:30 to 4:00pm, FA 2.206

    This workshop focuses on fundamental issues associated with publishing your research, one of the most important things you can do to advance your academic career.

    Join us to learn concrete strategies for identifying the most competitive journals, communicating with editors, and preparing and submitting a manuscript for publication in the social sciences.

    Light refreshments will be provided.

    Registration is required and will open at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesday, October 23. To register, go to https://utdallas.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_2mkD8HAKmcjABkV

    This workshop is presented in collaboration with Graduate Career Services.

  • Publishing Your First Journal Article in the Humanities
    Wednesday, November 14, from 2:30 to 4:00pm, FA 2.206

    This workshop focuses on fundamental issues associated with publishing your research, one of the most important things you can do to advance your academic career.

    Join us to learn concrete strategies for identifying the most competitive journals, communicating with editors, and preparing and submitting a manuscript for publication in the humanities.

    Light refreshments will be provided.

    Registration is required and will open at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesday, October 30. To register, go to https://utdallas.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_082uuT4UuDjlTnv

    This workshop is presented in collaboration with Graduate Career Services.

Download the Fall 2018 Graduate Writing Services Brochure!

 

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