Green Buildings

UT Dallas has undergone tremendous growth over the past 10 years. To support the campus’ increasing enrollment and infrastructure, Facilities Management has taken steps to build more efficient buildings, pursuing LEED [Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design] Certification on a number of them.

To request a tour of any the green buildings on campus, please contact sustainability@utdallas.edu.

Student Services Building

United States Green Building Council Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Platinum Certification. USGBC® and the related logo are trademarks owned by the US Green Building Council and are used with permission. usgbc.org

USGBC® and the related logo are trademarks owned by the US Green Building Council and are used with permission. usgbc.org

  • Certified LEED [Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design] Platinum
  • Project Completed: July 2010
  • Total Project Cost: $27,500,000
  • Size: 74,343 gsf [gross square feet]

Project Goals and Accomplishments

The goal of the Student Services Building (SSB) project was to design a building that was at least 50% more energy efficient than the average of all buildings on campus.

  • “Floating” terra-cotta louvers on the building’s exterior respond to the solar exposure in appropriate density.
  • The building’s energy efficiency is designed to perform 41% over Ashrae 90.1, offering $60,000 annual electrical savings representing a 63% improvement over the average of all buildings on campus.
  • The building maximizes Daylight Harvesting while providing 76% of all occupied spaces with natural daylight and 93% of all occupied spaces with views to the outside.
  • The design incorporates water conservation measures such as automatic sensors in faucets, dual flush toilets and low-flow (1 pint) urinals.

 

Student Services Building

Space planning was approached from the perspective of “doing more with less,” utilizing space efficiently, and creating opportunities to share space without duplicating space that would sit unoccupied most of the day.

  • An innovative, functional and efficient new space planning protocol was achieved by reducing the number of individual offices in favor of open office planning with multi-use spaces, plus shared conference and meeting rooms accessible by all departments via public corridors.
  • The benefits of open office space and shared meeting spaces versus individual offices achieved a 73% assignable to non-assignable building space ratio.

Sustainability Awards

  • Judge’s Choice Award for Energy Efficiency and Conservation; College Planning & Management, November 2011
  • Innovation in Green Building Award; AASHE [Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education] , USGBC [United States Green Building Council] , October 2011
  • Green School Award in the Higher Education category; US Green Building Council / Balcones chapter, October 2011)
  • Green Project Award of Merit; ENR [Engineering News-Record] Texas & Louisiana, October 2011
  • Public Green Deal of the Year; Dallas Business Journal, February 2011

Source: Building Reaps Multiple Sustainability Honors, UT Dallas News Center, December 13 2011

School of Management Addition

United States Green Building Council Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Silver Certification. USGBC® and the related logo are trademarks owned by the US Green Building Council and are used with permission. usgbc.org

USGBC® and the related logo are trademarks owned by the US Green Building Council and are used with permission. usgbc.org

  • Certified LEED [Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design] Silver
  • Project Completed: August 2014
  • Total Project Cost: $27,500,000
  • Size: 107,445 gsf [gross square feet]

The Naveen Jindal School of Management (JSOM) addition is a certified green building due to water and energy conservation features within the building. Recycled content of building materials and enhanced building commissioning also contribute to the LEED [Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design] certification. An Innovation in Design credit was achieved for creative use of open space in the courtyard.

 

Naveen Jindal School of Management Addition

Parking Structure 1

  • Zero-Net Energy
  • Project Completed: August 2013
  • Total Project Cost: $12,000,000
  • Size: 251,500 gsf [gross square feet]

Parking Structure 1 (PS1) was built with a 220kw [kilowatts] solar photovoltaic array on the fifth floor. It provides shaded parking as well as enough energy to make PS1 a zero-net energy building. LED [Light Emitting Diode] lighting and daylight harvesting reduce the demand for energy throughout the structure.

 

Parking Structure 1

Edith O’Donnell Arts & Technology Building

United States Green Building Council Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Silver Certification. USGBC® and the related logo are trademarks owned by the US Green Building Council and are used with permission. usgbc.org

USGBC® and the related logo are trademarks owned by the US Green Building Council and are used with permission. usgbc.org

  • Certified LEED [Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design] Silver
  • Project Completed: August 2013
  • Total Project Cost: $60,500,000
  • Size: 157,920 gsf [gross square feet]

The Edith O’Donnell Arts & Technology Building (ATC) met LEED [Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design] goals through a number of innovative design features. The building repurposed land that had been a tennis court, parking lot, and a bookstore. The white roof provides an energy efficiency credit by minimizing our heat island effect. Energy and water conservation measures within the building ensure efficiency and savings throughout the life of the building.

 

Edith O’Donnell Arts and Technology Building

Residence Hall West / Dining Hall West / Rec Center West

United States Green Building Council Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Silver Certification. USGBC® and the related logo are trademarks owned by the US Green Building Council and are used with permission. usgbc.org

USGBC® and the related logo are trademarks owned by the US Green Building Council and are used with permission. usgbc.org

  • Certified LEED [Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design] Silver
  • Project Completed: August 2014
  • Total Project Cost: $66,600,000
  • Size: 316,532 gsf [gross square feet]

The Residence Hall West complex (RHW / DHW / RCW) was certified under LEED [Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design] as a group project, as opposed to 3 separate buildings. The buildings do use a common heating and cooling system, making them very efficient. Expansion of the pond adjacent to Dining Hall West contributed to storm water credits under the LEED [Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design] criteria. Energy and water conservation measures throughout the complex ensure efficiency and savings throughout the life of the building.

 

Residence Hall West / Dining Hall West / Rec Center West

Bioengineering and Science Building

United States Green Building Council Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Silver Certification. USGBC® and the related logo are trademarks owned by the US Green Building Council and are used with permission. usgbc.org

USGBC® and the related logo are trademarks owned by the US Green Building Council and are used with permission. usgbc.org

  • Certified LEED [Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design] Gold
  • Project Completed: December 2015
  • Total Project Cost: $113,000,000
  • Size: 222,651 gsf [gross square feet]

The Bioengineering Science Building (BSB) has sustainable wood products throughout and a lighting conservation system that adjust to the amount of light outside the building using daylight harvesting sensors. In addition, rainwater collected from the roof irrigates the grounds of BSB and the Natural Science and Engineering Research Laboratory (RL).

 

Bioengineering and Science Building

Davidson-Gundy Alumni Center

United States Green Building Council Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Silver Certification. USGBC® and the related logo are trademarks owned by the US Green Building Council and are used with permission. usgbc.org

USGBC® and the related logo are trademarks owned by the US Green Building Council and are used with permission. usgbc.org

  • Certified LEED [Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design] Gold
  • Project Completed: August 2017
  • Size: 30,246 gsf [gross square feet]

Harnessing natural greenscape features and the use of reflective surfaces, the Davidson-Gundy Alumni Center (DGA) is a stellar example of a green building with heat-island effect reduction in mind. With strategically designed window placement in conjunction with surrounding shade trees, heating and cooling within the building is more controllable. This building was designed to be energy efficient while at the same time, capitalizing on the use of natural sunlight. The event and conference space energy systems can respond quickly and efficiently to changes in occupancy. Contributing to the building’s LEED [Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design] credentials, the use of recycled and locally sourced materials during the construction phase was a key factor in earning Gold.

 

Davidson-Gundy Alumni Center

Engineering and Computer Science West Building

United States Green Building Council Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Silver Certification. USGBC® and the related logo are trademarks owned by the US Green Building Council and are used with permission. usgbc.org

USGBC® and the related logo are trademarks owned by the US Green Building Council and are used with permission. usgbc.org

  • Certified LEED [Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design] Gold
  • Project Completed: August 2018
  • Total Cost: $86,130,000
  • Size: 206,570 gsf [gross square feet]

The Engineering and Computer Science West Building (ECSW), a four-story structure, is the new home of the Department of Mechanical Engineering. The glass-windowed building was created for research and teaching labs in energy, robotics, nanotechnology and biotechnology. It also features faculty offices, student workspaces, and a 300-seat auditorium. The exterior features light pollution reduction that can block the view of the night sky and a reflective rood to reduce the heat island effect on the building. It combines passive design strategies, high-performance assemblies and calibrated shading elements to reduce overall solar heat gain while maximizing daylight. The interior LEED [Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design] elements include healthy and recycled material, better indoor air quality, 35% less water usage, and a 16% energy reduction.

 

Engineering and Computer Science West Building

 

Take a tour of all the innovative features in the ECSW [Engineering and Computer Science West]  building. Can’t play the video? Download it in MPEG (MP4 [Moving Picture Experts Group Video] ), Ogg Theora (OGV [Ogg Theora Video] ), or WebM (WEBM [WebM Video] ) format.

Video Transcript

Music

(0:02-0:11) Gary Cocke, Associate Director for Sustainability: “UT Dallas is a young, smart, and innovative University. Since this is an Engineering Building, we wanted to walk the talk with our facility.”

(0:11-0:14) Tarum Basu, Assistant Dean for Facilities Management: ““This building has got so many spaces for the students.”

(0:15-0:22) Hongbing Lu, Professor of Mechanical Engineering & Associate Department Head: “The space is really vibrant, so it’s an exciting place to come, to work, to interact, to actually invent.”

(0:22-0:27) Kelly Kinnard, Assistant Vice President for Facilities Management: “The teaching goes on in the classroom, but a lot of the learning happens outside of the classroom.”

Music

(0:30-0:37) Kelly Kinnard: “Engineering on display was a huge driver. If you go through the building, what you would find is lots and lots of glass.”

(0:38-0:46) Gary Cocke: “We wanted students to be able to see how the building’s working. Even if they aren’t working in an area specifically, they can see the interesting work that’s taking place in the facility.”

(0:46-0:51) Hongbing Lu: “We hope people to see what we are doing so that provides motivation for them as well.”

(0:52-1:01) Kelly Kinnard: “When you walk down the hallways, you now see a perforated metal ceiling to where you can see everything that they will be working on in the Mechanical Engineering program.”

(1:02-1:05) Tarum Basu: “What parts they use for what purposes, those things are exposed intentionally.”

Music

(1:09-1:21) Gary Cocke: “One of the things we knew we wanted to incorporate in this building was lots of flexible space where students could settle down, where they could study, where they could read. Much of that space is on our South facing wall and that’s where we’ve used a lot of the smart glass”

(1:22-1:34) Kelly Kinnard: “We put it up and we gave people the ability to control the amount of light that they wanted to let into their offices without sacrificing the views. People who are happy in their space tend to be more productive.”

(1:35-1:42) Hongbing Lu: “So that helps save energy and that also give you a clean, vibrant feeling for the entire space.”

(1:42-2:11) Gary Cocke: “One of the big lessons we’ve learned with this is for one, you don’t have to sacrifice energy efficiency in order to have the open feel. If you wanted to have a building that is connected to the outside, using smart glass is a great option to do that because you are able to maintain that connection. Without having blinds, the glass makes it a comfortable area and it also allows them to feel like they aren’t in a cave; they aren’t hibernating while they’re studying. They’re still engaged with the building. They’re still having that connection with the outside.”

Music

(2:13-2:25) Kelly Kinnard: “Because of the visibility, because of the engineering on display, it doesn’t feel like you’ve walked into an institutional building. It feels more like you’ve walked into your living room or your den.”

(2:25-2:30) Tarum Basu: “This building has got so many spaces for the students, open space, that can be used that can be used for different purpose.”

(2:31-2:37) Kelly Kinnard: “They have taken to this building as if it’s theirs and that’s exactly what we wanted them to do.”

Music

(2:41-3:05) Gary Cocke: “We are certified LEED Gold with our Engineering Building here and we are very proud of that. Everything from our materials sourcing, to the site selection, to our recycling program was looked at very carefully. 70% of students look at a University’s sustainability program when they choose where to they’re going to go. Having a building like this helps to bring them to our campus and then having the capabilities, we are able to provide the training that they are going to need for the jobs of tomorrow.”

Ending Music